Skip to main content

Full text of "Boston Symphony Orchestra concert programs, 1948-1949, Trip, Season 68"

See other formats


^ #•: K 



"^^v; 



>» >: 



A/'-: 



-■^ ^. "i A. 



3&^^-^ 









i 

It 

i 
i 



I 



New York Programmes 






BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948- 1949 

Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



Violins 
Richard Burgin, 

Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 
Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 

Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 
Frank Zecchino 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 

Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhape 
Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 
Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
El ford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



^i^wi^^ 



i92'4\\Ci949 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgix, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
First Concert 

\VEDXESDAY EVENING, Xovember 10 

AND THE 

First Matinee 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, November 13 

with historicallfind descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The TRUSTEES of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver ^\'olcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



[1] 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Serge Koussevitzky, Music Director 

October 5, 1948 
Dear Mr. Taft: 

You have asked ho^v you and other devoted members 
of the Friends of the Orchestra can express to me in 
tangible form your "appreciation and gratitude" on my 
twenty-fifth anniversary as Conductor. Truly there is only 
one way in which F would wish you to do this — by a 
gift to the Orchestra, a big gift. 

World conditions are so uncertain and conditions here 
are so unsettled that even such an institution as the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, with all its maturity, fine 
traditions and high ideals, is vulnerable. Its permanence 
should be insured. You and the Trustees will know best 
how this should be accomplished. 

I would consider it the finest of all personal tributes 
if my friends should take this occasion to give convincing 
proof that this splendid orchestra to which I have de- 
voted my best efforts for nearly a quarter of a century 
shall never flounder or fall through lack of adequate 
financial support. 

Faithfully yours. 




(See page 4) 

[2] 



Carnegie Hall, New York 
Sixty-third Season ix Xe^v York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FIRST EVENING CONCERT 

WEDNESDAY, Nove^iber lo 



Program 



Vivaldi Concerto in D minor for Orchestra 

I. Maestoso 
II. Largo 
III. Allegro 

Brahms Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56A 

HoNEGGER Symphony for Strings 

I. Molto moderato 
II. Adagio mesto 
III. Vivace, non troppo 

INTERMISSION 

Beethoven Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. gse 

I. Poco sostenuto; Vivace 

II. Allegretto 

III. Presto; Assai meno presto; Tempo primo 

I\'. Allegro con brio 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library, 



rsi 



live 
again 
these 
moments . . . 

realistically reproduced 
with the 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 

FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 



PERMO Incorporated 

Chicago 2 6 



KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY 
FUND ESTABLISHED 

The establishment of the Serge Kous- 
sevitzky Anniversary Fund of the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra has been an- 
nounced by the Orchestra's Trustees. 
The sum asked is $250,000 for use 
without restrictions for cultural and edu- 
cational development by the Orchestra, 
and as a cushion against emergencies. It 
is to be a revolving fund in the sense 
that any withdrawals in any one year 
are to be restored as soon as practicable. 
The Trustees consider the Anniversary 
Fund as a prudent step in "long term 
planning." 

Henry B. Cabot, President of the 
Trustees, has stated in a communica- 
tion to the Friends of the Orchestra: 
"For twenty-five years our Orchestra 
has been under the inspired directorship 
of Serge Koussevitzky. ... It is proper 
that we who enjoy the concerts of our 
Orchestra and take pride in its continu- 
ing success should seize this occasion 
to record in tangible form our apprecia- 
tion of Dr. Koussevitzky's magnificent 
contribution to the fame of our historic 
institution. It is hoped that many others 
will care to join us in paying tribute to 
a worthy conductor who has served us 
so long and with such integrity and de- 
votion. It is his desire that any such 
expression should take the form of a 
gift to the Orchestra." 

Dr. Koussevitzky, in a letter to Edward 
A. Taft, the chairman, has warmly en- 
dorsed this plan. The letter is printed 
on page 2. 

All communications concerning the 
Fund should be sent to Mr. Edward A. 
Taft, Symphony Hall, Boston. 




[4] 



CONCERTO IN D MINOR, Op. 3, No. 11 
By Antonio Vivaldi 

(Born about 1680 in Venice; died in Vienna, July 28, 1741) 

Transcribed for Orchestra with Organ by Alexander Siloti* 



This is the eleventh of the set of twelve concerti grossi published by Vivaldi as 
Opus 3, under the title UEstro armonico (Harmonic inspiration). They ap- 
peared in Amsterdam about 1714 or 1716, under the publication of Roger et le 
Cene, dedicated to Ferdinand III of Tuscany. Vivaldi wrote these concertos for four 
violins, two violas, 'cello and organ bass. The Concerto in D minor, No. 11, has 
been edited also by Sam Franko and by Dezso d'Antalffy.f The edition of Alexander 
Siloti is based directly upon Vivaldi's original manuscript. It is scored for two flutes, 
two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contra-bassoon, organ and strings. 

The concerto in this arrangement was the opening number on Serge Kousse- 
vitzky's first program in America — at the Boston Symphony concerts of October 
10-11, 1924. 

THIS concerto bears its story of neglect, confusion and restitution. 
The music of Vivaldi has been so little known and regarded that 
when it was unearthed a century after his death in the State Library at 
Berlin in a copy made by Bach, many more years were destined to pass 
before it was recognized as the music of Vivaldi. 

The history of the concerto is this: Johann Sebastian Bach, probably 
in the last years of his Weimar period, evidently copied this concerto, 
according to a way he had of copying string concertos of the Italian 
master, adapting them for his own uses on the harpsichord or organ. 
Bach arranged this concerto for organ with two manuals and pedal. 
In about the year 1840, two copies in Bach's hand came to the light of 
day in the Prussian Staatshihliothek, and the concerto was circulated 
once more in the world, but this time in Bach's organ arrangement. 
It was presented by F. K. Griepenkerl in the Peters Edition at Leipzig, 
not as Vivaldi's music, not even as music of Sebastian Bach, but as the 
work of his son Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. The error is explained by 
the examination of the manuscript: The cover is missing, and at the 
top of the first page of the score, which is in the neat and unmistakable 
script of Sebastian Bach, there stands in the scrawled writing of Bach's 
eldest son: Di W. F. Bach," and underneath this: "Manu mei Patris 
descriptum." Herr Griepenkerl took the line "Copied by the hand of 



* Alexander Siloti, pianist and conductor, was born in Kharkov, Russia, October 10, 1863. 
A pupil of Nikolas Rubinstein and Tchaikovsky (at the Moscow Conservatory), and of Liszt, 
a friend and contemporary in his youth of such musicians as Rachmaninoff and Scriabin, 
be held the experience and memory of Russia's musical past. Alexander Siloti appeared as 
piano soloist at these concerts February 4, 1898, and April 7, 1922. He died December 8, 1945. 

t D'Antalffy's transcription is for. full orchestra, is based on Bach's arrangement, and exer- 
cises considerable freedom, putting the fugue at the end. This version was performed by th« 
New York Philharmonic Society, February 29, 1940, John Barbirolli conducting. 

[5] 



my father" on its face value and supposed the concerto to be the 
original work of Friedemann Bach, not questioning why the elder Bach 
should trouble to copy his son's music, and supporting his assumption 
by pointing out that the music is plainly in the style of Wilhelm Friede- 
mann and just as plainly not in the style of his father. 

The supposed original organ concerto of Friedemann Bach had a 
long and wide vogue and further appeared in an arrangement for 
piano by August Stradal. It was not until 1911 that Vivaldi's author- 
ship was established. Max Schneider made the correction in the Bach 
Jahrbuch of that year.* 

The introduction to the first movement is based on broad arpeggios 
and runs by the strings against sonorous chords. There follows a fugue, 
in which Siloti doubles strings and wood winds in the various voices, 
bringing in the organ for the full chords of the climax. The second 
movement is an even-flowing Largo in 6-8 rhythm, subdued and con- 
templative, and so in contrast with the surrounding movements. The 
editor scores the Largo for strings only. The final Allegro again de- 
velops fast, supple figurations, mostly by the violins, roundly supported 
by successions of chords. 

[copyrighted] 



VARIATIONS ON A THEME BY HAYDN, Op. 56a 
By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg on May 7, 1833; died at Vienna on April 3, 1897 



These variations, composed in the year 1873, were first performed at a concert 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra in Vienna, Felix Dessoff conducting, November 2, 
1873. The first performance in Boston is on record as having been given by Theo- 
dore Thomas' orchestra, January 31, 1874. 

The first performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra took place December 5, 
1884. 

The orchestration includes two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two 
bassoons and double-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, timpani, triangle and 
strings. 

FROM the time that Schumann proclaimed Johannes Brahms in his 
twenties as a new force in music, a torch-bearer of the symphonic 
tradition, friends and foes waited to see what sort of symphony this 
"musical Messiah" would dare to submit as a successor to Beethoven's 
mighty Ninth. The "Hamburg John the Baptist" realized what was ex- 
pected of him, and after his early piano concerto, which no audience 
accepted, and his two unassuming serenades, he coolly took his time 



* "The so-called Original Concerto in D minor of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach.' 
[6] ■ 



and let his forces gather and mature for some twenty years before yield- 
ing to the supreme test by submitting his First Symphony. This hap- 
pened in 1877. Three years earlier, he tried out his powers of orchestra- 
tion on a form less formidable and exacting than the symphony — a 
form which he had finely mastered in his extreme youth as composer 
for the piano — the theme with variations. In this, the first purely 
orchestral attempt of his maturity, Brahms, as usual when put on his 
mettle, took great pains perfectly to realize his aim. His abilities as 
orchestral colorist, so finely differentiated in each of the successive 
Variations on a Theme by Haydn, could not but be apparent even 
to its first audiences. 

At the first performance in Vienna, in November, 1873, the recep- 
tion was enthusiastic, and the critics only expressed their impatience 
that a symphony was not yet forthcoming from the vaunted "Bee- 
thovener." The variations were again played on December 10 in 
Munich, under Hermann Levi. They became inevitably useful in 
Brahms' round of concerts, and added appreciably to the reputation 
of the still hesitant symphonist. 

[copyrighted] 



SYMPHONY FOR STRING ORCHESTRA 

By Arthur Honegger 

Born at Le Havre, March 10, 1892 



The Symphonie pour Orchestra a Cordes is dated 1941. It was published in 1942 
with a dedication to Paul Sacher* and has been performed by him in Basel and 
other Swiss cities. The first American performance was by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra, December 27, 1946, Charles Miinch conducting. Dr. Koussevitzky opened 
the 1947 Berkshire Festival with this Symphony on July 24, 1947, and conducted 
it in the Friday and Saturday series, October 31, November 1, 1947 and October 
8, 1948. 

AT the end of the printed score is written, "Paris, October, 1941." 
XJL Willi Reich, writing from Basel for the Christian Science Monitor, 
May 19, 1945, remarked that the Symphony for Strings "embodies 
much of the mood of occupied Paris, to which the composer remained 
faithful under all difficulties." 

The first movement opens with an introductory Molto moderato, 
pp, with a viola figure and a premonition in the violins of things to 



* Paul Sacher is the conductor of the orchestra of the Collegium Miisicum Zurich, founded in 
1941. It was for him and his orchestra that Richard Strauss composed his recent 
"Metamorphosen.'" 

[7] 



come. The main Allegro brings full exposition and development. The 
introductory tempo and material returns in the course of the move- 
ment for development on its own account and again briefly before 
the end. 

The slow movement begins with a gentle accompaniment over which 
the violins set forth the melody proper. The discourse is intensified to 
ff, and gradually subsides. 

The finale, 6/8, starts off with a lively, rondo-like theme in duple 
rhythm, which is presently replaced by another in the rhythmic 
signature. The movement moves on a swift impulsion, passes through 
a tarantella phase, and attains a presto coda, wherein the composer 
introduces a chorale in an ad libitum trumpet part, doubling the first 
violins. (The choral theme is the composer's own.) 

M. Honegger conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra as guest, 
January 11-12, 1929, presenting his Chant de Nigamon, Prayer 
of Judith from the Opera Judith, and three songs from La Petite 
Sirene (Soloist — Cobina Wright) , Pastorale d'£.te, Horace Vic- 
torieuXj Rugby, Piano Concertino (Soloist — Mme. Andree Vaurabourg 
Honegger) , Pacific '2-^-1. 

Rugby (1928) approximates Pacific 2-^-1 as a musical depiction 
of human rather than mechanical energy. The Symphony for full 
orchestra, dedicated to the Boston Symphony Orchestra on its Fiftieth 
Anniversary, was composed in 1930 and performed here February 13, 
1931. His Mouvement Symphonique No. 3 was performed at these 
concerts November 3, 1933. He has since composed a Prelude, Arioso 
et Fughette sur le nom de Bach (1933) and a Nocturne (1939) and 
Symphonie Liturgique for Orchestra, two choral works in 1939: 
Nikolaus von der Flue (a Swiss national hero; this was performed 
in New York, May 8, 1941) and "Dance of Death" (after Holbein) , 
an opera — L'Aiglon (with Ibert, 1938), incidental music to Jeanne 
d'Arc au Bucher (Paul Claudel, 1938), the ballets Le Cantique des 
Cantiques (1938), and The Call of the Mountain on an Alpine 
subject, produced in Paris in the summer of 1945. M. Honegger has 
completed his Fourth Symphony. He has composed numerous chamber 
works. 

[copyrighted] 



(^£X2i^ 



[8] 



SYMPHONY NO. 7 IN A MAJOR, Op. 92 

By LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 

Born at Bonn, December 16 (?), 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827 



The Seven tn Symphony, finished in the summer of 1812, was first performed on 
December 8, 1813, in the hall of the University of Vienna, Beethoven conducting. 

It is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two 
trumpets, timpani and strings. The dedication is to Moritz Count Imperial von 
Fries. 

It would require more than a technical yardstick to measure the true 
proportions of the Seventh sympkony —the sense of immensity which it 
conveys. Beethoven seems to have built up this impression by wilfully 
driving a single rhythmic figure through each movement, until the 
music attains (particularly in the body of the first movement, and in 
the Finale) a swift propulsion, an effect of cumulative growth which 
is akin to extraordinary size. 

The long introduction (Beethoven had not used one since his 
Fourth Symphony) unfolds two vistas, the first extending into a 
succession of rising scales, which someone has called "gigantic stairs," 
the second dwelling upon a melodious phrase in F major which, 
together with its accompaniment, dissolves into fragments and evapo- 
rates upon a point of suspense until the rhythm of the Vivace, which 
is indeed the substance of the entire movement, springs gently to life 
(the allegro rhythm of the Fourth Symphony was bom similarly but 
less mysteriously from its dissolving introduction). The rhythm of 
the main body of the movement, once released, holds its swift course 
almost without cessation until the end. There is no contrasting theme. 
When the dominant tonality comes in the rhythm persists as in the 
opening movement of the Fffth Symphony, which this one resembles 
and outdoes in its pervading rhythmic ostinato, the **cellule" as 
d'Indy would have called it. The movement generates many subjects 
within its pattern, which again was something quite new in music. 
Even the Fifth Symphony, with its violent, dynamic contrasts, gave 
the antithesis of sustained, expansive motion. Schubert's great 
Symphony in C major, very different of course from Beethoven's 
Seventh, makes a similar effect of size by similar means in its Finale. 
Beethoven's rhythmic imagination is more virile. Starting from three 
notes it multiplies upon itself until it looms, leaping through every 
part of the orchestra, touching a new secret of beauty at every turn. 
Wagner called the symphony "the Dance in its highest condition; the 
happiest realization of the movements of the body in an ideal form." 
If any other composer could impel an inexorable rhythm, many times 
repeated, into a vast music — it was Wagner. 

In the Allegretto Beethoven withholds his headlong, capricious 
mood. But the sense of motion continues in this, the most agile of his 
symphonic slow movements (excepting the entirely different Allegretto 
of the Eighth). It is in A minor, and subdued by comparison, but 

[9] 



pivots no less upon its rhythmic motto, and when the music changes to 
A major, the clarinets and bassoons setting their melody against triplets 
in the violins, the basses maintain the incessant rhythm. The form 
is more unvarying, more challenging to monotony than that of the 
first movement, the scheme consisting of a melody in three phrases, the 
third a repetition of the second, the whole repeated many times 
without development other than slight ornamentation and varied 
instrumentation. Even through two interludes and the fugato, the 
rhythm is never broken. The variety of the movement and its replen- 
ishing interest are astounding. No other composer could have held 
the attention of an audience for more than a minute with so rigid a 
plan. Beethoven had his first audience spellbound with his harmonic 
accompaniment, even before he had repeated it with his melody, 
woven through by the violas and 'cellos. The movement was encored 
at once, and quickly became the jfublic favorite, so much so that 
sometimes at concerts it was substituted for the slow movements of 
the Second and Eighth Symphonies. Beethoven was inclined, in his 
last years, to disapprove of the lively tempo often used, and spoke of 
changing the indication to Andante quasi allegretto. 

The third movement is marked simply "presto/* although it is a 
scherzo in effect. The whimsical Beethoven of the first movement is 
still in evidence, with sudden outbursts, and alternations of fortissimo 
and piano. The trio, which occurs twice in the course of the move- 
ment, is entirely different in character from the light and graceful 
presto, although it grows directly from a simple alternation of two 
notes half a tone apart in the main body of the movement. Thayer 
reports the refrain, on the authority of the Abbe Stadler, to have 
derived from a pilgrims' hymn familiar in Lower Austria. 

The Finale has been called typical of the "unbuttoned" (aufge- 
knopft) Beethoven. Grove finds in it, for the first time in his music, 
"a vein of rough, hard, personal boisterousness, the same feeling which 
inspired the strange jests, puns and nicknames which abound in his 
letters. Schumann calls it "hitting all around" (''schlagen um sich"). 
"The force that reigns throughout this movement is literally prodi- 
gious, and reminds one of Carlyle's hero Ram Dass, who had 'fire 
enough in his belly to burn up the entire world.' " Years ago the 
resemblance was noted between the first subject of the Finale and 
Beethoven's accompaniment to the Irish air "Nora Creina," which he 
was working upon at this time for George Thomson of Edinburgh.* 

It is doubtful whether a single hearer at the first performance of the 
Seventh Symphony on December 8, 1813, was fully aware of the 



* In an interesting article, "Celtic Elements in Beethoven's Seventh Symphony" {Muaicai 
Quarterly, July, 1935), James Travis goes so far as to claim: "It is demonstrable that the 
themes, not of one, but of all four movements of the Seventh Symphony owe rhythmic and 
melodic and even occasional harmonic elements to Beethoven's Celtic studies." 

However plausibly Mr. Travis builds his case, basing his proofs upon careful notation, 
it is well to remember that others these many years have dived deep into this symphony in 
pursuit of special connotations, always with doubtful results. D'Indy, who called it a "pastoral" 
symphony, and Berlioz, who found the scherzo a ''ronde des paysan^" are among them. The 
industrious seekers extend back to Dr. Carl Iken, who described in the work a revolution, 
fully hatched, and brought from the composer a sharp rebuke. Never did he evolve a more 
purely musical scheme. 

[10] 



importance of that date as marking the emergence of a masterpiece 
into the world. Indeed, the new symphony seems to have been looked 
upon as incidental to the general plans. The affair was a charity concert 
for war victims. f Johann Nepomuk Malzel's new invention, the 
"mechanical trumpeter," was announced to play marches "with full 
orchestral accompaniment," but the greatest attraction of all was 
Beethoven's new battle piece, Wellington's Victory, or the Battle of 
Vittoria, which Beethoven had designed for Malzel's "Pan-harmoni- 
can" but at the inventor's suggestion rewritten for performance by a 
live orchestra. This symphony was borne on the crest of the wave of 
popular fervor over the defeat of the army of Napoleon. When 
Wellington's Victory was performed, with its drums and fanfares and 
God Save the King in fugue, it resulted in the most sensational 
popular success Beethoven had until then enjoyed. The Seventh 
Symphony, opening the programme, was well received, and the 
Allegretto was encored. The new symphony was soon forgotten when 
the English legions routed once more in tone the cohorts of Napoleon's 
brother in Spain. 

Although the jSeventh Symphony received a generous amount of 
applause, it is very plain from all the printed comments of the time 
that on many in the audience the battle symphony made more of an 
impression than would have all of the seven symphonies put together. 
The doubting ones were now ready to accede that Beethoven was a 
great composer after all. Even the discriminating Beethoven enthusi- 
asts were impressed. When the Battle of Vittoria was repeated, the 
applause, so wrote the singer Franz Wild, "reached the highest ecstasy," 
and Schindler says: "The enthusiasm, heightened by the patriotic 
feeling of those memorable days, was overwhelming." This music 
brought the composer directly and indirectly more money than 
anything that he had written or was to write. 

The initial performance of the Symphony, according to Spohr, was 
"quite masterly," a remark, however, which must be taken strictly 
according to the indifferent standards of his time, rather than our own. 



t The proceeds were devoted to the "Austrians and Bavarians wounded at Hanau" in 
defense of their country against Napoleon (once revered by Beethoven). 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

Four Year Degree Course Three Year Diploma Course 

Artist's Diploma One Year Preliminary Course Master's Degree 

Courses arranged for special students 

For further information, write the Dean 
290 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. 





# # 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bring you a wealth of tl- 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

# Symphony No. 5, in B-Flot — Schubert. Serge Koussevitzky conducting the Boston 
Orchestra. Album DM-1215, $4.75. 

# Concerto for Violin, Piano and String Quartet in D, Op. 21 — Chousson. Jesus h 
Sanroma, Pianist, with Heifetz, Violinist, and the Musical Art Quartet. DM-877, $ 

# Copriccio — Stravinsky. Jesus Maria Sanroma, Pianist, with the Boston Symphony 
conducted by Serge Koussevitzky. DM-685, $3.50. Prices include Federal excise tax 
subject to change without notice. ("DM" albums available in manual sequence, $1 extra. 



The newest Crestwood is everything you've wanted in a radio- 
phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out unit. Rich 
tone of the ''Golden Throat." AM, short wave, FM radio. Plays up to 
12 records automatically. "Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC. 



Victrola 612V4. ("Victrola"— T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. OfF.) 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 



tkM 



TUNE T( 



[12] 



Kt 



OUSSEVITZKY 




SANROMA 




RCA VICTOR SHOW STARRING ROBERT MERRILL 5 = 30 PM SUNDAYS OVER WBZ 

[»3] 



The open letter which the gi-atified Beethoven ^\Tote to the Wiener 
Zeitung thanked his honored colleagues "for their zeal in contributing 
to so exalted a result." The letter was never published, and Thayer 
conjectures tliat the reason for its withdi*awal was Beethoven's sudden 
quarrel with Malzel, whom he had singled out in this letter with 
particular thanks for giving him the opportunity "to lay a 'vvork of 
magnitude upon the altar of the Fatherland." 

The concert was repeated on Sunday, December 12, again with full 
attendance, the net receipts of the two performances amounting to 
4,000 florins, which were duly turned over to the beneficiaries. 
Schindler proudly calls this "one of the most important movements in 
the life of the master, in -^vhich all tlie hitherto divergent voices save 
those of the professional musicians united in proclaiming him worthy 

of the laurel. A work like tlie Battle Symphony had to come in order 
that divergent opinions might be united and tlie mouths of all o{> 

ponents, of whatever kind, be silenced." Tomascliek was distressed that 
a composer with so lofty a mission should have stooped to the "rude 
materialism" of such a piece. "I was told, it is true, that he himself 
declared the work to be folly, and that he liked it only because with 
it he had thoroughly thrashed the \'iennese." Thayer assumes that 
Beethoven's musical colleagues who aided in the performance of the 
work "viewed it as a stupendous musical joke, and engaged in it con 
amore as in a gigantic professional frolic." 

The Seventh Symphony had a third performance on the second of 
January, and on FebruaiT 27, 1814, it was performed again, together 
with the Eighth Symphony. Perfonnances elsewhere show a somewhat 
less hearty reception for the Seventh Symphony, although the Alle- 
gretto was usually immediately liked and was often encored. 
Friedrich \V^ieck, the father of Clara Schumann, was present at the 
first performance in Leipzig, and recollected that musicians, critics, 
connoisseurs and people quite ignorant of music, eacli and all were 
unanimously of the opinion that the Symphony — especially the first 
and last movements — could have been composed only in an unfor- 
tunate di"unken condition ('trunkenen Zustdnde") . 

[copyrighted] 



[Ml 



Carnegie Hall 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

FIRST AFTERNOON CONCERT 
SATURDAY, November 13 



Program 

Prokofieff Symphony No. 5, Op. 100 

I. Andante 

II. Allesrro moderato 

III. Adagio 

IV. Allegro giocoso 

INTERMISSION 

Ravel Concerto for Piano and Orchestra 

I. Allegramente 
II. Adagio assai 
III. Presto 

Ravel...., "Daphnis et Chloe/' Ballet (Second Suite) 

Lever du jour — Pantomime — Danse generale 



SOLOIST 

JEStiS MARIA SANROMA 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

' The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library. 



[15] 



SYMPHONY NO. 5, Op. 100 

By Serge Prokofieff 

Born in Sontsovka, Russia, April 23, 1891 



Prokofieff composed his Fifth Symphony in the summer of 1944. It had its first 
performance in Moscow on January 13, 1945, when the composer conducted. The 
symphony had its first American performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
November 9, 1945. 

The orchestra required consists of two flutes, two clarinets, E-flat clarinet and 
bass clarinet, two oboes and English horn, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four 
horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, 
harp, piano, military drum and strings. 

PROKOFIEFF composed his First ("Classical") Symphony in 1916- 
1917 and his Fourth (Op. 47) in 1929, dedicating it to this or- 
chestra on its fiftieth anniversary. It was after fifteen years of much 
music in other forms that he composed another. Robert Magidoff, 
writing from Moscow to the Nezv York Times (March 25, 1945), de- 
scribed the Fifth Symphony. Prokofieff told the writer that he had been 
working upon this Symphony "for several years, gathering themes for 
it in a special notebook. I always work that way, and probably that is 
why I write so fast. The entire score of the Fifth was written in one 
month in the summer of 1944. It took another month to orchestrate 
it, and in between I wrote the score for Eisenstein's film, Tvan the 
Terrible.' " 

"The Fifth Symphony," wrote Magidoff, "unlike Prokofieff's first 
four, makes one recall Mahler's words: *To write a symphony means 
to me to create a whole world.' Although the Fifth is pure music and 
Prokofieff insists it is without program, he himself said, *It is a sym- 
phony about the spirit of man.' " 

It can be said of the symphony in general that the broad construc- 
tive scheme of the four movements is traditional, the detailed treat- 
ment subjective and daring. 

The opening movement. Andante, is built on two full- voiced 
melodic themes, the first in triple, the second in duple beat. Contrast 
is found in the alternate rhythm as both are fully developed. There 
is an impressive coda. The second movement has earmarks of the 
classical scherzo. Under the theme there is a steady reiteration of a 
staccato accompaniment, 4-4. The melody, passed by the clarinet to 
the other wood winds and by them variously treated, plays over the 
marked and unremitting beat. A bridge passage for a substantial wind 
choir ushers in (and is to usher out) the trio-like middle section, which 
is in 3-4 time and also rhythmically accented, the clarinet first bearing 
the burden of the melody. The first section, returning, is freshly 
treated. At the close the rhythm becomes more incisive and intense. 
The slow movement, Adagio, 3-4 (9-8) , has, like the scherzo, a per- 
sistent accompaniment figure. It opens with a melody set forth espres- 
sivo by the wood winds, carried by the strings into their high register. 

[16] 



^EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




Tlie EMPLOYERS' LiabOiiy Aixummx Corporation Ltd. 
thx EM PLOTEBS' Fire tiuuraact Company 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS' Imarane* Company 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are firetraps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 

Your local Employers' Group insurance agent, 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 




[17] 



The movement is tragic in mood, rich in episodic melody. It carries 
the symphony to its deepest point of tragic tension, as descending 
scales give a weird effect of outcries. But this tension suddenly passes, 
and the reprise is serene. The finale opens Allegro giocoso, and after 
a brief tranquil (and reminiscent) passage for the divided 'cellos 
and basses gives its light, rondo-like theme. There is a quasi-gaiety 
in the development, but, as tlii^oughout the Symphony, something 
ominous seems always to lurk around the corner. The awareness of 
brutal warfare broods over it and comes forth in sharp dissonance — as 
at the end. 

Prokofieff completed his Sixth Symphony last autumn, and described 
it in a letter of September 6 to the Am-Rus Division of the Leeds 
Music Corporation: "The Sixth Symphony in E minor is in three 
movements; two of them were sketched last summer and at present 
I am working on the third. I am planning to orchestrate the whole 
Symphony this autumn. The first movement is agitated in character, 
lyrical in places and austere in others. The second movement, andante, 
is lighter and more songful. The finale, lighter and major in its 
character, would be like the finale of my Fifth Symphony but for 
the austere reminiscences in the first movement." 

The Symphony was performed in Moscow on Christmas Day, 1947. 
It met with disapproval, and the incident was shortly followed by the 
denunciation of Prokofieff and six other composers by the Central 
Committee of the Communist Pai'ty. The new symphony has so far 
been ^vithheld from this country. 

f COPYRIGHTED] 

CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 

By Maurice Ravel 

Born at Ciboure, Basses Pyrenees, March 7, 1875; died in Paris, December 28, 1937 



This concerto was first performed January 14, 1932, at a Lamoureux concert in 
Paris. Ravel conducted the work and Marguerite Long, to whom it was dedicated, 
was the soloist. It was first heard in America April 22, 1932, on which date the 
orchestra of Boston (Jesiis Maria Sanromd, soloist) and Philadelphia (Sylvain 
Levin, soloist) each performed the work in its o\\'n city.* It was repeated (with 
Mr. Sanroma) at a memorial concert, January 28, 1938. 

The orchestration consists of piccolo, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinets in 
B-flat and E-fiat, two bassoons, tAvo horns, trumpet, trombone, timpani, triangle, 
side drum, bass drum, cymbals, tam-tam, wood block, whip, harp and strings. 

RAVEL, asked to compose music for performance in the fiftieth 
anniversary season of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1930-31) , 
spoke of a piano concerto. But the score was not forthcoming from 



* Under the heading "Temporal Arithmetic," H. T. Parker commented amusingly in the 
Boston Evening Transcript: 

"To begin with the idle splitting of a hair. This afternoon Dr. Koussevitzky and the 
Boston Orchestra, Mr. Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra, Mr. Sanroma in 
Boston, Mr. Levin in Philadelphia, are playing for the first times in America Ravel's new 

[18] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^^'^\l°'if2ir^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Xos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Oyerture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Xos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland '*E1 Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto Xo. 12), Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony X"o. 3 

Harris Symphony X"o. 3 

Haydn Symphonies X'o. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto (Soloist : William Kapell) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony X^o. 4 ("Italian") 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

X"o. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kije," Suite ; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March ; "Peter and 
the Wolf" ; "Eomeo and Juliet," Suite ; Symphony 
X^o. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff .- "Isle of the Dead" ; "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe." Suite Xo. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane. Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie X^o. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony Xo. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

Xo. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony X^'o. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies X^os. 2 and 5 ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (SanromS.) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies X'os. 4, 5, 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 

[»9] 



the meticulous and painstaking composer. "Ravel worked at it con- 
tinuously for more than two years," so Henry Prunieres reported 
after the completion at the end of 1931, "cloistering himself in his 
home at Montfort TAmaury, refusing all invitations, and working ten 
and twelve hours a day." Ravel told this writer that "he felt that in 
this composition he had expressed himself most completely, and that 
he had poured his thought into the exact mold he had dreamed." 
In 1931, while this score was still in process of composition, he ac- 
cepted another commission — a commission which he succeeded in 
fulfilling. This was the Piano Concerto for the Left Hand, composed 
for the one-armed pianist, Paul Wittgenstein. The two concertos were 
Ravel's last works of orchestral proportions. 

"The concerto," wrote Henry Prunieres, "is divided into three parts, 
after the classical fashion. The first movement, allegramente, is con- 



Piano Concerto. In Symphony Hall and in the Academy of Music it is second item on the 
program. The Bostonian conductor's first piece is a Concerto for Orchestra by Martelli, rel- 
atively brief ; the Philadelphia conductor's Sibelius' Fourth Symphony, appreciably longer. 
Dr. Koussevitzky and Mr. Sanroma will sound the first measures of Ravel's Concerto ten or 
fifteen minutes before Messrs. Stokowski and Levin do likewise. They will sound the last 
while the Philadelphians are still dallying with the middle periods. Therefore in Boston 
Ravel's Concerto will be heard for the first time in America, Q. E. D. which is also "right 
and proper," since the piece was once intended for the jubilee year, 1930-1931, in Symphony 
Hall. In short, the Boston Orchestra has lost a dedication, but won — by a nose — a 
premiere !" 

CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 
240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

[20] 



structed on a gay, light theme, which recalls Ravel's early style. It 
appears first in the orchestra, while the piano supplies curious 
sonorous effects in a bitonal arpeggiated design. The development 
proceeds at a rapid pace with a surprising suppleness, vivacity, and 
gi'ace. This leads to an andante a piacere where the piano again takes 
the exposition of the theme, while the bassoons, flutes, clarinets, and 
oboes surround it one after another with brilliant scales and runs. 
Then begins a grand cadenza [of trills over arpeggios]. The orches- 
tra enters again discreetly, at first marking the rhythm, and then 
taking up the develoj^ment, leading to a brilliant conclusion. 

"The second movement, adagio assai, consists of one of those long 
cantilenas ^vhich Ravel knows so well how to write and w^hich are 
not without analogy with certain arias of Bach. Evolving over an 
implacable martellato bass, the melody is developed lengthily at the 
piano, then, little by little, the orchestra takes possession of it while 
the piano executes fine embroideries and subtle appoggiaturas. 

"The presto finale is a miracle of lightness and agile grace, and 
recalls certain scherzi and prestos of Mozart and Mendelssohn. The 
orchestra marks a syncopated rhythm while the piano leads the move- 
ment. The spirit of jazz animates this movement as it inspired the 
andante of the sonata for violin and piano, but with great discretion. 
Nothing could be more divorced from the spirit of the pasticcio. 
Nothing could be more French, more Ravel." 

Emile Vuillermoz, who w^as present at the first performance of the 
Concerto in Paris, recorded for the Christian Science Monitor his 
impressions of the new work: "It is written in the brilliant and trans- 
parent style of a Saint-Saens or a Mozart. The composer has wished 
to write a work exclusively intended to bring out the value of the 
piano. There is in it neither a search for thematic novelty nor intro- 
spective nor sentimental intentions. It is piano — gay, brilliant and 
witty piano. The first movement borrows, not from the technique, but 
from the ideal of jazz, some of its happiest effects. A communicative 
gayety reigns in this dazzling, imaginative page. The Adagio is con- 
ceived in the Bach ideal, ^vith an intentionally scholastic accompani- 
ment. It has admirable proportions and a length of phrase of singular 
solidity. And the Finale in the form of a rondo sparkles with wit and 
gayety in a dizzy tempo in which the piano indulges in the most 
amusing acrobatics. The work is very easy to understand and gives 
the impression of extreme youth. It is wonderful to see ho-w this 
master has more freshness of inspiration than the young people of 
today who flog themselves uselessly in order to try to disco\er, in 
laborious comedy or caricature, a humor that is not in their tem- 
perament." 

[copyrighted] 

[21] 



JESUS Maria Sanroma was born in 1903, in Puerto Rico, of Cata- 
lonian parents. He was sent to this country in 1917 by the Puerto 
Rican Government to complete his musical education at the New 
England Conservatory of Music. His teachers have been Mme. An- 
toinette Szumowska in Boston, Alfred Cortot in Paris, and Artur 
Schnabel in Berlin. In 1924 he made his recital debut in Boston, and 
in 1926 his orchestral debut with Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. After touring Europe, he became the official 
pianist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and in that capacity par- 
took in the first performances of Hill's Concertino; Dukelsky's 
Dedicaces, Piston's Concertino; the first performances in America of 
Honegger's Concertino, Stravinsky's "Capriccio," Ravel's Concerto. 

In 1943 he resigned from these duties to devote himself to concert 
tours of both Americas. 



DAPHNIS ET CHLOE - Ballet in One Act - Orchestral 

Fragments 
Second Series: "Daybreak," "Pantomime," "General Dance" 

By Maurice Ravel 
Born at Ciboure, Basses- Pyr^n^es, March 7, 1875; died in Paris, December 28, 1937 



The ballet Daphnis et Chloe was completed in 1912*, and first produced June 8, 
1912 by Diaghileff's Ballet Russe, at the Chdtelet in Paris, Pierre Monteux conduct- 
ing. Of the two orchestral suites drawn from the ballet, the second had its first 
performance at the concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, December 14, 1917 
(Dr. Karl Muck conducting). 

The Second Suite is scored for two flutes, bass flute and piccolo, two oboes 
and English horn, two clarinets in B-flat, clarinet in E-flat and bass clarinet, three 
bassoons and contra -bassoon, four horns, four trumpets, three trombones and tuba, 
timpani, bass drum, two side drums, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, castanets, 
celesta, glockenspiel, two harps and strings. A wordless mixed chorus is written 
in the score, but is optional and can be replaced by instruments. 

IN HIS autobiographical sketch of 1928, Ravel described his Daphnis 
et Chloe as "a choreographic symphony in three parts, commis- 
sioned from me by the director of the company of the Ballet Russe: 
M. Serge de Diaghileff. The plot was by Michel Fokine, at that time 
choreographer of the celebrated troupe. My intention in writing it was 



* This according to Serge Lifar, who was a dancer in the Ballet Russe at that time and 
who states that Daphnis et Chloe was not put on in 1911, "because Ravel was not yet 
ready. At last, in 1912 he sent the orchestral score to Diaghileff." — "La Revue Musicale," 
December, 1938. 

[22 J 



to compose a vast musical fresco, less scrupulous as to archaism than 
faithful to the Greece of my dreams, which inclined readily enough 
to what French artists of the late eighteenth century have imagined 
and depicted. 

"The work is constructed symphonically according to a strict tonal 
plan by the method of a few motifs, the development of which achieves 
a symphonic homogeneity of style. 

"Sketched in 1907, Daphnis was several times subjected to revision 
—notably the finale." 

There were late revisions. If Ravel's date of igoyjis indeed correct, 
''Daphnis et Chloe" was five years in the making and must indeed 
have many times been "remis surle metier,'* as Ravel expressed it, before 
the perfectionist was sufficiently content with his handiwork to release 
it for dancing and for printing. 



t The date is surprising. Diaghileff's Ballet had its first Paris season in 1909 ; 1909, and 
sometimes 1910, are given as that in which Ravel began "Daphnis et Chloe." Roland-Manuel 
thinks that Ravel made a "mistake of two years" in naming 1907, which again is surprising, 
since Roland-Manuel originally wrote the autobiographical sketch at Ravel's dictation. In 
1907 Diaghileff was in Paris and probably had met Ravel, but there was no plan as yet for 
a ballet season in Paris. It is, of course, possible that Ravel's first sketches for "Daphnia et 
Chloe" were purely symphonic in intent, a fact he might not have been quick to admit aftar 
the vicissitudes of the piece in the theatre. 



Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Second Pair of Concerts 

Wednesday Evenings January l2 

Saturday Afternoon^ January 75 



[23] 



\ Diaghileff, deflecting the principal creative musicians of the day 
(Stravinsky, Strauss, Debussy) to his purposes, could not quite make 
ballet composers out of them, and the same may be said of Ravel. 
Nijinsky and Karsavina danced the title parts in the original pro- 
duction. The scenario was by Fokine; the designer of scenery and 
costumes was Leon Bakst. An indifferent success was reported, at- 
tributable in part to a gathering storm of dissension between Fokine 
and Diaghileff. There was considerable dissension within the Ballet 
Russe at liie time. Disagreement seems to have centered on the prob- 
lem of a danced presentation of subjects from Ancient Greece. Nijinski, 
even while miming the character of Daphnis, was executing, accord- 
ing to novel ideas of his own, "L'Apres-Midi d'un Jaune." It can be 
well imagined that, in the presentation of ''Daphnis et Chloe," Nijinski 
and Fokine found it hard to work together. One can further surmise, 
from Ravel's later allusion to "the Greece of his dreams," a "late 
eighteenth century" Greece would not have contributed toward single- 
mindedness in the rehearsals of "Daphnis." Those rehearsals were 
many and extended to the very morning of the first performance. They 
took place, according to Serge Lifar, "under a storm cloud. The corps 
de ballet ran afoul of the 5-4 rhythm in the finale, and counted it out 
by repeating the syllables 'Ser-ge-Dia-ghi-leff,' *Ser-ge-Dia-ghi-leflE'." 
When the season ended, there duly followed the break between Fokine 
and Diaghileff. As for the music itself, it has found fitful usefulness 
in the theatre, but enjoys a lusty survival in the concert hall. 

rhe story conies from a document of ancient Greece, and is at- 
tributed to a sophist, Longus, who lived in the second or third cen- 
tury A.D. It is the oldest of countless tales of the love, tribulation and 
final union of a shepherd and shepherdess. The first version of 
Daphnis and Chloe to appear in print was a French translation by 
Amyot, which was printed in 1559. The first English translation was 
made by Angell Dave, printed in 1587. A translation by George Thorn- 
ley (1657) is in current print. Thornley in a preface "to the criticali 
reader," commends the author as "a most sweet and pleasant writer," 
and calls the tale "a Perpetual Oblation to Love; An Everlasting Ana- 
thema, Sacred to Pan, and the Nymphs; and, A Delightful Possession 
even for all." 

[copyrighted] 



<^^^^ 



^ 



M 



I 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SCHEDULE OF CONCERTS, Season 1948-1949 



^CTOBER 

I ^ 

15-16 

22-23 

P 26 
29-30 



NOVEMBER 
2 

9 
10 
11 

i 13 

*• 16 

19-20 

21 

23 

26-27 

30 



Wellesley 




Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. I) 


Boston 


(Tues. A) 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. II) 


Providence 


(0 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. Ill) 


Boston 


(Sun. a) 


Cambridge 


(1) 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. IV) 


:r 

Boston 


(Tues. B) 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. V) 


New Haven 


(1) 


New York 


(Wed. 1) 



Hunter College 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Providence 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Pittsburgh 



DECEMBER 

1 Cleveland 

2 Cincinnati 

3 Chicago 

5 Milwaukee 

6 Ann Arbor 

7 Detroit 

8 Rochester 
10-11 Boston 

14 Cambridge 

17-18 Boston 

21 Boston 

22-23 Boston 

28 Boston 
31 -Jan. 1 Boston 



JANUARY 
2 

4 
7-8 
II 
12 
»3 
14 
15 



Boston 
Boston 
Boston 
Springfield 
New York 
Washington 
Brooklyn 
New York 



(0 

(Sat. 1) 

(2) 

(Fri.-Sat. VI) 
(Sun. b) 
(Tues. C) 
(Fri.-Sat. VII) 



(Fri.-Sat. VIII) 

(2) 

(Fri.-Sat. IX) 
(Tues. D) 
(Fri.-Sat. X) 
(Pension Fund) 
(Fri.-Sat. XI) 



(Sun. c) 
(Tues. E) 
(Fri.-Sat. XII) 



(Wed. 2) 

(2) 
(Sat. 2) 



21-22 
23 
25 

28-29 



Cambridge 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 



FEBRUARY 



1 

4-5 

8 

1 1-12 

16 

17 

18 

19 

22 

25-26 

27 

MARCH 

1 

4-5 

8 

11-12 
14 

15 
16 

17 
18 

19 

22 

25-26 

27 
29 

APRIL 

1-2 

5 

8-9 

12 

13 
14 
15 
16 

»9 
22-23 

24 
26 

29-30 



Providence 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

New York 

Newark 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 



Providence 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Hartford 

New Haven 

New York 

Newark 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Providence 



Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

New York 

New Brunswick 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 



(3) 

(Fri.-Sat. XIII) 

(Sun. d) 

(Tues. F) 

(Fri.-Sat. XIV) 



(3) 

(Fri.-Sat. XV) 

(4) 

(Fri.-Sat. XVI) 

(Wed. 3) 

(0 
(3) 
(Sat. 3) 

(Tues. G) 
(Fri.-Sat. XVII) 
(Sun. e^ 



(A) 

(Fri.-Sat. XVIII) 

(5) 

(Fri.-Sat. XIX) 

(2) 
(Wed. 4) 

(2) 

(4) 

(Sat. 4) 
(Tues. H) 
(Fri.-Sat. XX) 
(Pension Fund) 

(5) 



(Fri.-Sat. XXI) 

(6) 

(Fri.-Sat. XXII) 

(Wed. 5) 

(5) 

(Sat. 5) 
(Tues. I) 
(Fri.-Sat.XXIII) 
(Sun. f) 
(Spec, concert) 
(Fri.-Sat. XXIV) 




Ial6ti»m 



The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — ^"'It is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIK PIANO COMPANY 

160 Boylston St., Boston . Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 

Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON, HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC CRCAN 



fl'r. 



W 









r^S^ 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



^ 



r 



/^:> 



,Q 



'iiil 



.A'^ 



^VTSOv 



H 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948-1949 

Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 
PERSONNEL 

Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 



Violins 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Roll and Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir ResnikofiE 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 
Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 

Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 



Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 



George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon MarjoUet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Horns 
Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Prijicipals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 









SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Second Concert 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, January 12 

AND THE 

Second Matinee 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, January 15 

with historical and descriptive notes by 

John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 

[1] 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
ANNIVERSARY FUND 

of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

The goal for this appeal, which will be the only 
appeal during this Anniversary Year, is $250,000 
net after all expenses of the Orchestra for the current 
year have been met. This sum is approximately four 
times as much as the amount contributed by the 
Friends of the Orchestra during the past season. 

All who care to join in honoring Dr. Koussevitzky 
on his twenty-fifth year of service in the only 
manner he wants are invited to enroll as Friends 
of the Orchestra and Contributors to the Serge 
Koussevitzky Fund. 

To enroll, slnijAy send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston 75. "Big" gifts and 
small will be gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 

Gifts received through January 5 are $118,318. 
Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 

FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Edward A. Taft, Chairman 

KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

All gifts to the Orchestra are tax deductible. 



Carnegie Hall, New York 
Sixty-third Season in New York 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

SECOND EVENING CONCERT 
WEDNESDAY, January 12 

Program 

American Music Festival 

ScHUMAN American Festival Overture 

Foss Recordare 

(First perfnrnuinre in Xfir York. Conducted b\ the Composer.) 

Barber Concerto for Violin and Orchestra 

I. Allegro molto iiioderato 
IT. Andante sostenulo 
Til. Prc'sio. in molo pcipeiuo 

I N T E R M T S S T O N 

Coweet Hymn and Fuguing Tune No. 2 

Pi.sTON Symphony No. 3 

I. Andantino 

II. Allegro 

III. Adagio 

IV. Allegro 

SOEOIST 

RUTH POSSELT 

BALDWIN. piano VICTOR RECORDS 

The mu.sic of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library. 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Xetwoik (Station WNBC) Tuesday, 11:9,0-12:00 P.M. 



rs] 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

FIdelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelifone Master 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelifone ] .25 

Fidelifone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelifone Floofing Point 50c 

r CKIllU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY MUSIC 
FOUNDATION 

1942: Nicolai Berezowsky — Symphony 

No. 4 
Benjamin Britten — Opera, "Peter 

Grimes" 
Samuel Barber — Composition (in 

preparation) 
Bohuslav Martinu — Symphony 

No. 3 
1943: Bela Bartok — Concerto for Or- 
chestra 
Igor Stravinsky — Ode 
William Schuman — Symphony 

for Strings 
William Bergsma — Second String 

Quartet 
Robert Palmer — String Quartet 
1944: Darius Milhaud — Symphony 

No. 2 
Aaron Copland — Symphony No. 3 
Nikolai Lopatnikoff — Concertino 

for Orchestra 
Burrill Phillips — Overture for 

Orchestra, "Tom Paine" 
194S: Olivier Messiaen — Symphony 

(in preparation) 
Heitor Villa-Lobos — Madona 
Howard Hanson — Piano Con- 
certo 
Lukas Foss — Capriccio for 'Cello 

and Piano 
Alexei Haiefif — Eclogue for 

'Cello and Piano 
David Diamond — Symphony 

No. 4 
Harold Shapero — Symphony (for 

Classical Orchestra) 
Nikolai Nabokov — "The Return 

of Pushkin" (Soprano and Or- 
chestra) 
1946: Walter Piston — Symphony No. 3 
Marc Blitzstein — "The Little 

Foxes," Opera (in preparation) 

1947: Roy Harris — Symphony (in 
preparation) 

Francesco Malipiero — Fourth 
Symphony 

Arnold Schonberg — composition 
for symphony orchestra, narra- 
tor and chorus, "Survivor from 
Warsaw" 

Benjamin Britten — Symphony 

Bias Galindo — composition for 
instrument with piano (in prep- 
aration) 

Earl George — composition for 
instrument with piano (in prep- 
aration) Arioso (for 'Cello and 
Piano) 

1948: Randall Thompson — Symphony 
Arthur Honegger — Composition 
for Orchestra 



[4] 



AMERICAN FESTR'AL OVERTURE 

By \\^ILLIAM Ho\VARD SCHUMAN 

Born in New York City, August 4, 1910 



The American Festival Overture was composed in the summer of 1939 for fvvo 
special concerts of American music by the Boston Symphonv Orchestra, and first 
performed at the second of these concerts in Symphonv Hall, October 6, 1939. 

The orchestration is as follows: two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English 
horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, four horns, tuo trumpets, three trombones 
and tuba", timpani, bass drum, cymbals, snare drum, xylophone, and strings. 



T 



HE composer wrote as follows about his Overture on the occasion 
of its first performance. 



"The first three notes of this piece will be recognized by some 
listeners as the 'call to play' of boyhood days. In New York City it 
is yelled on the syllables, 'Wee-Awk-Eee' to get the gang together for 
a game or a festive occasion of some sort. This call very naturally 
suggested itself for a piece of music being composed for a very festive 
occasion. From this it should not be inferred that the Overture is 
program music. In fact, the^dea for the music came to mind before 
the origin of the theme was recalled. The development of this bit of 
'folk material,' then, is along purely musical lines. 

"The first section of the work is concerned with the material dis- 
cussed above and the ideas growing out of it. This music leads to a 
transition section and the subsequent announcement by the violas 
of a Fugue subject. The entire middle section is given over to this 
Fugue. The orchestration is at first for strings alone, later for wood 
winds alone and finally, as the Fugue is brought to fruition, by the 
strings and wood winds in combination. This climax leads to the 
final section of the work, which consists of opening materials para- 
phrased and the introduction of new subsidiary ideas. The tempo of 
the work is fast." 

The composer attended the public schools in New York, and gradu- 
ated with Bachelor of Science and Master of Arts degrees from 
Columbia University. He was the pupil of Max Persin in harmony, of 
Charles Haubiel in counterpoint, and studied composition in a more 
general sense with Roy Harris. He attended the Mozarteum Academy, 
in Salzburg, Austria. He taught for several years at Sarah Lawrence 
College, in Bronxville, New York, and is interested in problems of 
progressive education in relation to the arts. He held a Guggenheim 
fellowship (1939-40, 1940-41) . 

He has served as editor for G. Schirmer, Inc., and in 1945 became 
President of the Julliard School of Music. 

The music of AVilliam Schuman was first performed by a major 
orchestra when his Second Symphony was introduced in Boston, in 
February, 1939. The Third Symphony was introduced at these concerts 
in 1941. The Fourth Symphony, completed in 1942, has not been per- 
formed at these concerts. 

[5] 



His "Prayer in Time of War" was first performed by this orchestra 
October 6, 1944, and his Symphony for Strings November 12, 1943. 
Mr. Schuman has also composed a William Billings Overture (1943) , 
"Side Show for Orchestra" (1944), and a Violin Concerto (1946). 
His Secular Cantata No. 2, "A Free Song," for chorus and orchestra 
(which took the First Pulitzer Music Prize for 1943), a setting of 
Walt Whitman, was performed by this orchestra on March 26, 1943. 
He has also written for chorus with orchestra the First Secular Cantata, 
"This is Our Time," and a Prologue; choral music a capp^lla — a 
Choral Etude, Prelude, and "Truth Shall Deliver — A Ballad of Good 
Advice"; for chorus with piano accompaniment — ''Requiescat," and 
"Holiday Song." The Ballet "Undertow" was produced by the Ballet 
Theatre in 1945. 

Chamber music includes a Concerto for Piano and small orchestra, 
a quartetino for Four Bassoons, and three string quartets. The First 
Symphony, for 18 instruments, written in 1935, has never been pub- 
lished. 

[COPYRIGHTEDp 



RECORDARE 
By LuKAs Foss 

Born August 15, 1922 

Recordare is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, two 
clarinets, E-flat clarinet and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four 
horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, percussion, harp, piano, 
celesta and strings. 

THE composer explains the tragic character of this music by pointing 
out that it was begun on the day of the death of Mohandas K. 
Gandhi (January 30, 1948). He has had no thought of attempting 
the reflection of events surrounding the career of the great leader. 
Nevertheless, an expression of mourning prevails in the beginning and 
in the end. The middle section is agitated and desperate. The whole 
work is somber in mood, with the exception of the more serene second 
theme. The main theme which is first heard from the clarinet is woven 
throughout the entire composition. It undergoes many changes and 
appears in more than a dozen different forms: slow, fast, and again 
slow. 

The title, "Recordare'* is derived from a section of the traditional 
Requiem mass. It is the word itself, signifying "to record," or "remem- 
ber" and not any ritual significance which has moved the composer 
to choose it for this work. 

[6] 



Lukas Foss, having grown up in the United States, received his 
principal musical education, and reached his majority here, is gen- 
erally considered what he naturally considers himself — an American 
composer. Born abroad (Berlin, August 15, 1922) , he studied at the 
Paris Conservatoire from the age of eleven (1933) until he was fifteen, 
at which time (1937) he was brought to this country by his parents. 
At the Conservatoire he had studied piano with Lazare-Levy, theory 
with Noel Gallon, and orchestration with Felix Wolfes, continuing 
instruction he had had from Julius Herford. He attended the Curtis 
Institute of Music in. Philadelphia, studying composition with Rosario 
Scalero and Randall Thompson, conducting with Fritz Reiner and 
piano with Isabelle Vengerova, and graduating with honors after three 
years. During the first three summers of the Berkshire Music Center 
he was a conductor-pupil of Dr. Koussevitzky and joined the composi- 
tion class of Paul Hindemith, continuing his work with this composer 
at Yale University. He joined the faculty of the Berkshire Music Center 
in 1946. 

His symphonic piece. The Prairie^ drawn from the Cantata of the 
same title, was first performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
October 15, 1943. The Cantata was performed in Town Hall, New^ 
York, in 1944, under the direction of Robert Shaw; in 1945 by 
the New York Philharmonic Orchestra under the direction of Artur 
Rodzinski, and in Jordan Hall, under the composer's direction, 
December 15, 1948. The Ode has been performed by the New York 
orchestra, the Ode and the Symphony in G by the Pittsburgh Sym- 
phony Society, the Piano Concerto on a Columbia Broadcasting net- 
work. There have been other orchestral performances. The Ballet 
The Gift of the Magi has been produced by the Ballet Theatre, and 
performed on tour (Boston included) . The Song of Songs was intro- 
duced by the Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1946. 

Mr. Foss has conducted as guest the Pittsburgh and Los Angeles 
Orchestras, the New York City Center and Philharmonic Stadium 
Orchestras, the CBS Orchestra. He became the official pianist of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra in 1944. 

* -*-• 

There follows a list of the music by Lukas Foss. The earliest works 
are not included: 

^937 4 Two-voiced Inventions, for piano 

*937 Grotesque Dance, for piano 

1937 Sonata for Violin and Piano 
193^ 3 Songs, with piano 

1938 Set of 3 Pieces, for 2 pianos 

March — Andante — Concertino 

1939 Sonatina, for piano 
J 939-40 2 Symphonic Pieces 

1939-40 Music to the Tempest of Shakespeare (Pulitzer Scholarship Prize) 

1940 Passacaglia, for piano 

[7] 



1940 Melodrama and Dramatic Song of Michael Angelo, for voice and piano 

1940 Cantata dramatica for Orchestra, Solo Tenor, Chorus 

1940 4 Preludes for Flute, Clarinet and Bassoon 

1941 "We Sing," cantata for children 

1941 2 Pieces for orchestra: Dance Sketch and Allegro Concertante 

1941 Duo for 'Cello and Piano 

1941-42 Clarinet Concerto (later turned into a piano concerto) 

1942 The prairie (Cantata for 4 solo voices — Chorus — orchestra) (Awarded 

a citation by the N. Y. Music Critics Circle in 1944) 

1942 The Prairie, Symphonic Piece 

1943 Piano Concerto 

1944 Fantasy-Rondo for Piano (Recorded by. Concert-Hall Society) 
1944 3 Pieces for Violin and Piano 

1944 "Within These Walls," Ballet for Virginia Johnson 

1944 "The Heart Remembers," Ballet for Humphrey and Weidman 

1944 Ode for Orchestra 

1944 Symphony in G (No. 1) 

1945 "Tell this Blood," a cappella chorus 

1945 "Gift of the Magi," Ballet for Ballet Theatre 

1945 Pantomime for Orchestra 

1945 Song of Anguish (from Isaiah) for Baritone and Orchestra (Commissioned 

by the Kulas Foundation) 

1946 Capriccio for 'Cello and Piano (Commissioned by the Koussevitzky Music 

Foundation) 

1946 Song of Songs (2nd Biblical Solo Cantata) for Soprano and Orchestra 

(Commissioned by the League of Composers) 

1947 Adon Olom (Cantor, Chorus and Organ) 

1947 String Quartet in E 

1948 Oboe Concerto 
1948 Recordare 

[copyrighted] 



CONCERTO FOR VIOLIN AND ORCHESTRA 

By Samuel Barber 

Born at West Chester, Pa., March 9, 1910 



Mr. Barber completed his Violin Concerto in July, 1940, at Pocono Lake Preserve 
in Pennsylvania. It calls for wood winds in twos, two horns, two trumpets, per- 
cussion, piano and strings. 

It was performed by the Philadelphia Orchestra, Eugene Ormandy conducting, 
Albert Spalding soloist, February 7 and 8, 1941, and by the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra at the Berkshire Symphonic Festival, Ruth Posselt soloist, August 16, 
1941, and at the Boston concerts, March 6, 1942. 

THE first movement — Allegro molto moderato — begins with a 
lyrical first subject announced at once by the solo violin, with- 
out any orchestral introduction. This movement as a whole has per- 
haps more the character of sonata than concerto form. The second 
movement — Andante sostenuto — is introduced by an extended oboe 
solo. The violin enters with a contrasting and rhapsodic theme, after 
which it repeats the oboe melody of the beginning. The last move- 

[8] 



ment, a perpetual motion, exploits the more brilliant and virtuoso 
characteristics of the violin."* 

Allegretto. The nostalgic memories of the child's parents bring the 
music to a climax Maestoso, after which this nostalgic "nocturne" 
subsides to a gentle close. 

Music figured early in Samuel Barber's life. It is told that he had 
piano lessons at the age of six and at seven made his first attempt at 
composition. He entered the Curtis Institute of Music in Philadelphia 
when he was thirteen, and there he studied piano v/ith Isabelle 
Vengerova and singing with Emilio de Gogorza. But his main interest 
was composition, which he studied with Rosario Scalero. 

There have been performances of his music by orchestras in the 
United States, in London, in Rome, in Salzburg, in Moscow, and 
other European cities. The Boston Symphony Orchestra has performed 
his Overture "The School for Scandal," his "Essay for Orchestra" No. 
1, his Violin Concerto, his "Commando March," his Second Sym- 
phony (dedicated to the Army Air Forces) , and his Violoncello 
Concerto. His Knoxville: Summer of igi^, for Soprano and Orchestra 
had its first performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, April 9, 
1948. His Adagio for Strings was conducted numerous times by 
Arturo Toscanini and taken by him to South America. Mr. Barber 
has also written a Symphony in One Movement, which he has revised, 
a second "Essay," "Music for a Scene from Shelley," and his "Capri- 
corn Concerto" for Elute, Oboe, Trumpet, and Strings. His chamber 
music includes a Serenade for String Quartet, "Dover Beach" (for 
baritone voice and string quartet) , a Violoncello Sonata and a String 
Quartet in G minor. For chorus he has written "The Virgin Martyrs" 
(for women's voices), "Reincarnation," and "A Stop Watch and an 
Ordnance Map" (for men's voices and kettle drums) . He has also 
written a number of songs. 

[copyrighted] 



* Quoted from the program books of the Philadelphia Orchestra. 



<^^^^ 



rg] 



RUTH POSSELT 



RUTH PossELT, bom in Medford, Massachusetts, made her debut 
at the age of nine, giving a recital in Carnegie Hall. Her subse- 
quent career has led to six tours of Europe, where she has appeared in 
recitals and with the principal orchestras of various countries, in- 
cluding Soviet Russia. She played under Monteux and Paray in 
Paris, Mengelberg and Szell in Holland. Her tours of this country 
include appearances as soloist with orchestra in Boston, New York, 
Chicago, Detroit, Washington, Cincinnati, St. Louis, Pittsburgh, and 
Indianapolis. Miss Posselt has performed with the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra Violin Concertos by Tchaikovsky, Dvorak, Lalo, and 
Mozart (Bach-Mozart Festival) , and has introduced to these concerts 
the concertos of Hill, Bosmans ("C oncer tstuk"), Piston, Barber, and 
Dukelsky. She gave the first American performance of Hindemith's 
Concerto, with this Orchestra, April 19, 1940, repeating it February 

1, 1947- 



HYMN AND FUGUING TUNE, No. 2, for String Orchestra 

By Henry Cowell 
Born in Menlo Park, California, March 11, 1897 



Composed in the early part of 1944, this Hymn and Fuguing Tune was per- 
formed in March of that year in a broadcast by the NBC Orchestra, Henri Nosco 
conducting. The first performance in a public concert was by the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, March 29, 1946. 

MR. Cowell explains that "the melodies are original, but the 
work pays respect to the early American modal religious 
musical style, containing severe simplicity of rhythm and form and 
many open chords incidental to fervent flowing polyphony." 

Henry Dixon Cowell is the grandson of an Episcopal Dean of Kil- 
dare, Ireland. He was taught the violin as a small child, but soon 
abandoned this instrument and ultimately became a composer and 
pianist. He received his first real musical training in the University 
of California under Charles Seeger, but he is largely self-taught. He 
has always been an experimentalist in his art and developed the 
term "tone cluster" to describe keyboard music played by the hand 
or arm rather than by the fingers, and cultivating special new tone 

[10] 



colors from the piano. He has toured Europe and America as a pianist, 
lectured and written books on his art, notably "American Composers 
on American Music" and "The Nature of Melody." He founded 
the New Music Quarterly and the Xew Music Orchestra Series for 
the publication of music of a pioneering nature. Together with 
Professor Leon Theremin, in\entor of the "Theremin \'ox," he in- 
vented the "rhythmicon," designecL to produce an unprecedented 
complex of rhythms. "From one to six sounds in a given time in- 
terval are made by this instrument at the pitches which correspond 
to their metric frequency in the overtone series" (John Tasker 
Howard, "Our Contemporary Composers") . 

[copyrighted] 



SYMPHONY NO. 3 
By Walter Piston 

Born in Rockland, Maine, January 20, 1894 



Walter Piston completed his Third Symphony at South "Woodstock, Vermont, in 
the summer of 1947. He composed it by commission of the Koussevitzky Music 
Foundation and dedicated the score "To the Memory of Natalie Koussevitzky." It 
was first performed by this Orchestra, January 9, 1948. It Avas awarded the Pulitzer 
Prize for a musical composition in 1948. 

The orchestration is as follows: two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English 
horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, 
three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, snare drum, cymbals, 
triangle, xylophone, glockenspiel, two harps, and strings. 

THE First Symphony by Piston was introduced by this orchestra 
March 8, 1938, the composer conducting. The Second Symphony 
was performed here March 6, 1944, when C AVallace AVoodworth 
was the guest conductor. Mr. Piston has kindly provided the follow- 
ing analysis: 

I. Andantino 5-4 — based on three thematic elements: the first 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

CONCERT BY CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA 

Malcolm H. Holmes, Conductor 

and 

CONSERVATORY CHORUS 

LoRNA CooKE deVaron, ConducloY 

BRUCKNER >U\SS IN E minor 
Jordan Hall, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, February 16 and 17 

at 8:15 p.m. 
Tickets for reserved floor seats free at Jordan Hall Box Office. 



[•>! 




ajUmj 




$ * 





Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bring you a wealth of the 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Annong them: 

# "Classical" Symphony in D, Op. 25 — ProkofiefF. Serge Koussevitzky conducting the 
Symphony Orchestra. DM-1241, $3.50. In manual sequence, $1 extra. 

# Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80 — Brahms. Serge Koussevitzky conducting the S 
Symphony Orchestra. 12-0377, $1.25. 

# A 'Barcillunisa and Contu a Timuni — Traditional Sicilian Folk Songs. Giuseppe cr 
with orchestra conducted by Alberto Erede. 10-1461, $1. 

# Addio, MignonTFa core! and Ah! non credevi tu! from "Mignon" — Thomas. Giusej 
with orchestra conducted by Alberto Erede. 12-0529, $1.25. 
Prices include Federal excise tax and are subject to change without notice. 



The newest Crestwood is everything you've w^anted in a radio- 
phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out unit. Rich 
tone of the ''Golden Throat." AM, short wave, FM radio. Plays up to 
12 records automatically. ''Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC. 
Victrola 612V4. ("Victrola"— T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. OfF.) 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 




HAV 



[12] 



KOUSSEVITZKY 



jno, 
Stefano, 




Dl STEFANO 



^ 



1^^/f.^^ 



JHEARD THE RCA VICTOR SHOW? SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 

[i3] 



heard as a melody for the oboe; the second, more sombre in character, 
played by horn, clarinets, and English horn; the third, soft chords 
for brass. These ideas are developed singly and in combination to form 
a prelude-like movement. Tonality C. 

II. Allegro 2-4 — a scherzo, in three-part form. The theme, stated 
by violas and bassoons, is treated in contrapuntal, imitative fashion. 
The middle part is marked by the melody for flute, accompanied by 
clarinets and harps. Tonality F. 

III. Adagio 4-4 — the movement has four large and closely con- 
nected sections, or rather "phases" of the musical development. The 
first of these is the statement by the strings of the theme, which is in 
three parts (part one by violins, part two by violas and 'celli, part 
three by all except basses) . The second section is a variation of the 
theme, with woodwinds and harps predominating. The third section, 
starting with basses and 'celli, builds up to the climax of the move- 
ment, and the final section returns to the original form of the theme, 
played by solo viola, the closing cadence recalling the variation by 
clarinet and bassoon. Tonality G. 

IV. Allegro 3-4 — a three-part form similar to that of a sonata- 
form movement. There are two themes, the first being developed 
fugally in the middle section. The second theme is march-like, first 
heard in oboes and bassoons, over a staccato bass, and later played by 
full brass at the climax of the movement. Tonality C. 

The symphonic works of Walter Piston have in a number of cases 
been first performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra: Symphonic 
Piece (1928); Suite for Orchestra (1930) ; Concerto for Orchestra 
(1934); Symphony No. 1 (1938). Other works first performed else- 
where but played at these concerts are Concertino for Piano and 
Chamber Orchestra (1937) ; Violin Concerto (1940) ; Sinfonietta 
(1941) ; Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (1943) ; Sym- 
phony, No. 2 (1944) ; Toccato, 1948. The Third String Quartet, first 
performed at the Symposium* on Criticism at Harvard in 1947, 
is the latest of a number of outstanding works in this medium. The 
music for the Ballet "The Incredible Flutist" was introduced at the 
Boston Pops (1938). Notable products of Mr. Piston's career as edu- 
cator are his invaluable books on "Harmony" (1941) and "Counter- 
point" (1947), published by W. W. Norton. 

[copyrighted] 



<^^^^ 



[Ml 



Carnegie Hall 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SECOND AFTERNOON CONCERT 

SATURDAY, January 1 5 

Program 

American Music Festival 

Diamond Rounds for String Orchestra 

I. Allegro, molto vivace 
II. Adagio 
III. Allegro vigoroso 

Fine Toccata Concertante 

(First performance in New York) 

Hanson Concerto in G major for Pianoforte and 

Orchestra, Op. 36 
I. Lento molto e molto tranquillo; allegro deciso 
II. Allegro feroce, molto ritmico 

III. Andante molto espressivo 

IV. Allegro giocoso 

{First performance in New York. Conducted by the Composer.) 

INTERMISSION 

Harris Symphony No. 3 (in one movement) 

Hill Music for English Horn and Orchestra, Op. 50 

(Soloist: Louis Speyer) 

Copland A Lincoln Portrait 

{Speaker: Wesley Addy) 

SOLOIST 

RUDOLF FIRKUSNY 

Mr. FiRKusNY uses the Steinway Piano 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library. 

[15I 



ROUNDS FOR STRING ORCHESTRA 

By David Diamond 

Born at Rochester, New York, July 9, 1915 



Rounds for String Orchestra was composed in June and July, 1944, by com- 
mission for Dimitri Mitropoulos, and was first performed by this conductor and 
the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, November 24 of that year. It was per- 
formed at the Boston Symphony Concerts April 5, .1946. 

AT THE very outset of the first movement, so the composer explains, 
L "the different string choirs enter in strict canonic fashion as an 
introduction for the main subject, which is played by the violas and 
soon restated by the 'cellos and basses. The Adagio is an expressive 
lyric movement, acting as a resting-point between the two fast move- 
ments. The last movement again makes use of characteristic canonic 
devices, though it may more specifically be analyzed as a kind of fugal 
movement cast in rondo form. The rhythmic device which opens the 
first movement is again utilized in the last movement as a kind of 
counter-subject for the principal thematic ideas, so helping to 'round' 
out the entire work and unify the entire formal structure." 

Mr. Willi Apel, whose Harvard Dictionary of Music is invalu- 
able when a precise but adequate definition of a musical form is re- 
quired, has this to say about the round: "Common name for a circle 
canon, i.e., a canon in which each singer returns from the conclusion 
of the melody to its beginning, repeating it ad libitum. The result 
of a three- voice round is indicated in the following scheme: 



a b c 
a b 

a 



a b c 
cab 

b c a 



It appears that the melody of a round always consists of sections of 
equal length which are so designed as to make good harmony with each 
other. . . . The earliest and most famous round is the Sumer-canon 
of the thirteenth century which is designated as rota (wheel) . The 
rondellus of the thirteenth century was much the same thing, pos- 
sibly lacking the initial imitation, i.e., with all the voices starting 
simultaneously (after the repeat sign) .... Rounds enjoyed an ex- 
treme popularity in England, particularly in that variety known as 
catch." 

[copyrighted] 



[16] 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYEBS* UabUiiy AuunuK* Corpcratien Ltd. 
Tbc EMPLOYERS' Fire Iiuuranc* Company 
AMERICA}! EMPLOY^IS' Inaranc* Company 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our coimnon 

enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 





Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



l»7l 



TOCCATA CONCERT ANTE 
By Irving Fine 

Born in Boston, December 3, 1914 



The Toccata Concertante, composed in the summer of 1947, is scored for two 
flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, 
two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, and 
tuba, timpani, side drum, bass drum, cymbals, piano and strings. 

There is a dedication "To my wife." 

Ihe following description of the score has been provided by the 
composer. 

"The word toccata is commonly used to describe improvisatory dis- 
play pieces for keyboard instruments. It has also been used in con- 
nection with concerted music of a fanfare-like character. It is in this 
latter sense that I have used the term. In writing this piece, I was 
aware of a certain affinity with the energetic music of the Baroque 
concertos. Hence the qualifying adjective, concertante. Moreover, this 
adjective seemed particularly appropriate because ot tne soiistic nature 
of much of the orchestration, especially in the second theme group and 
closing sections of the exposition and recapitulation. 

The piece is roughly in sonata form. There is a short, fanfare-like 
introduction containing two motives which generate most of the sub- 
sequent thematic material. The following exposition contains a first 
section which makes prominent use of an ostinato and is rather in- 
determinate in tonality. A transitional theme, announced by the trum- 
pet and continued by the flute and bassoon, is abruptly terminated 
and followed by a second theme group, more lyrical in character. In 
this section the thematic material is chiefly entrusted to solo wind 
instruments supported by string accompaniment. The whole of the 
exposition is concluded by additional woodwind dialogue and scat- 
tered references to some of the preceding material. There are several 
episodes in the development, one of the most prominent being a fugato 
announced by the clarinets and based on the opening ostinato. There 
is no break between the development and recapitulation, the return 
of the first material commencing at the climax of the development. 
The second and closing sections of the exposition are recapitulated in 
the main tonality without significant changes except for a few in in- 
strumentation and texture. The whole piece is rounded off by an 
extended coda. 



Irving Fine studied piano with Frances L. Grover, majored in music 
at Harvard University (A.B. 1937, A.M. 1938) where he studied theory 
and composition under Walter Piston, Edward Burlingame Hill, and 
A. Tillman Merritt. He continued his studies with Nadia Boulanger 
in Cambridge and France. For several years he was assistant conduc- 
tor of the Harvard Glee Club and Choir. At present he is Assistant 

[18] 



Professor of Music- at Harvard University. Since 1946 he has been a 
member of the faculty of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood. 
The following works have been published: Three Choruses from 
Alice in Wonderland (1943) ; A cantata — The Choral New Yorker 
(1944) ; Sonata for Violin and Piano (1946) ; and the Suite — Music 
for Piano (1947) . He has composed: Music for Modern Dance (1941) ; 
a Partita for Woodwind Quintet (1948) ; incidental music to Alice in 
Wonderland; and miscellaneous pieces for piano and voice. 

[copyrighted] 



CONCERTO FOR PIANOFORTE AND ORCHESTR.\ 

By Howard Hanson 

Bom in Wahoo, Nebraska, October 28, 1896 



Howard Hanson has composed this, his only Piano Concerto, by commission of 
the Koussevitzky Music Foundation. The orchestration calls for two flutes and 
piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three 
trombones and tuba, timpani, xylophone, snare drum, and strings. 

THIS Concerto, despite its four movements, is short in length and 
modest in scope. The coda which concludes the finale brings back 
material from the first movement. The composer has treated the piano 
as a lyrical rather than as a percussive instrument. 

Howard Hanson w^as born of Swedish parents, Hans and Hilma 
Hanson, at Wahoo, Nebraska. First taught by his mother, he continued 
his studies in Luther College and the University School of Music of his 
native State. He studied composition at the Institute of Musical Art 
in New York with Percy Goetschius, and later at the Northwestern 
University School of Music at Evanston, under C. Lutkin and Arne 
Oldberg. Taking his degree in 1916, he taught at the "College of the 
Pacific" in San Jose/ California. In 1921 he w^as elected to a three-year 
fellowship in composition at the American Academy in Rome. Return- 
ing to America in 1924, he was appointed director of the Eastman 
School of Music at Rochester, New York, the position which he no^v 
holds. 

His First ("Nordic") Symphony was performed at the concerts of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, April 5, 1929, the composer conduct- 
ing. The Second ("Romantic") Symphony, composed for the fiftieth 

[»9] 



anniversary year of this orchestra, was first performed in that season 
(November 28, 1930) , Serge Koussevitzky conducting. The Third Sym- 
phony had its first concert performance November 3, 1939, by this 
orchestra, the composer conducting. The Fourth Symphony was intro- 
duced by this Orchestra December 3, 1943. 

In addition to the three symphonies. Dr. Hanson's orchestral works 
include the symphonic poems "North and West" (1923), ''Lux 
Aeterna" (1923) , and "Pan and the Priest" (1926) . There is an Organ 
Concerto (1926), and a suite from "Merrimount." "Merrimount," a 
three-act opera to a libretto of Richard Stokes, was produced by the 
Metropolitan Opera Company in New York in 1932. Choral works 
include "The Lament of Beowulf" (1925) ; "Heroic Elegy" (1927) ; 
Songs from "Drum Taps," after Walt Whitman (1935) ; and a tran- 
scription for chorus and orchestra of Palestrina, "Pope Marcellus 
Mass" (1937). His Serenade for Flute, Harp, and Strings was per- 
formed by this Orchestra October 25, 1946. Chamber works include a 
piano quintet, a piano quartet, and a string quartet. 

[copyrighted] 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



WADSWORTH PRO VAN DIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of sinping by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio : Kenmore 6-9495 Residence : Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Mass. 

[20] 



RUDOLF FIRKUSNY 

RUDOLF FiRKUSNY was bom in Napajedla, Czecho-Slovakia, February 
11, 1912. He entered the State Conservatory in Brno (Briinn), 
eventually studying piano with Vilam Kurz and Artur Schnabel, com- 
position with Leo Janacek and Joseph Suk. He made his first public 
appearance at the age of ten .with the Philharmonic Orchestra in 
Prague. His career as pianist first brought him to the United States 
for a concert tour in 1938. But when his country was occupied in 
that year he was in Prague, about to depart for a tour of France. He 
succeeded in keeping his engagements and in December, 1940, was 
able to return to the United States. In addition to appearances in 
this country he made a tour of South America in 1943 and of Central 
America in 1944. He appeared with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
November 2-3, 1945, in the first performances of Menotti's Piano Con- 
certo in F major. On April 18, 1947, he performed the Concerto 
No. 1 by Brahms. 



SYMPHONY NO. 3 
By Roy Harris 
Born in Lincoln County, Oklahoma, February 12, 1898 



Roy Harris composed, his Third Symphony during the autumn of 1938, and 
completed the proofreading in January, 1939. The first performance was at these 
concerts, February 24, 1939, and repeated October 27, 1939. It was performed at 
a special concert of American music, October 6, 1939, and repeated December 26, 
1941. 

The Symphony is scored for three flutes and piccolo, t^wo oboes and English 
horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, 
three trombones and tuba, timpani, vibraphone, cymbals, triangle, and strings. 

THE Symphony is a continuous work in one movement, of about 
sixteen minutes' duration. The composer has provided, instead of 
a long prose analysis, the following structural outline of his score: 

Section I. Tragic — low string sonorities. 
Section II. Lyric — strings, horns, wood winds. 
Section III. Pastoral — emphasizing wood-wind color. 
Section IV. Fugue — dramatic. 

A. Brass — percussion predominating 

5 Canonic development of Section II material constituting background for 

^^- I further development of Fugue 

C. Brass climax. Rhythmic motif derived from Fugue subject 



Section V. Dramatic — Tragic. 

Restatement of Violin Theme Section I. Tutti strings in canon with hitti 
wood winds 

Brass and percussion develops rhythmic motif from climax of Section IV 

Materials: 

1. Melodic Contours — Diatonic — Poly tonal. 

2. Harmonic Textures — Consonance — Polvtonal. 

Since the music of Roy Harris was first heard at the Boston Sym- 
phony concerts with the first performance of his "Symphony: 1933," 
on January 26, 1934, this composer has Avritten music of interest, and 
he has not lacked performances. The Second Symphony, composed in 
1934, was performed at these concerts February 28, 1936, Richard 
Burgin conducting. The Fourth {Folk Sojig) Symphony was per- 
formed by this Orchestra February 21, 1941, his Fifth Symphony, 
February 26, 1943, Symphony No. 6, April 14, 1944. Each of the sym- 
phonies except the Fourth has had its first performance by this Orches- 
tra, which also introduced Celebration, Variations on a Theme by 
Howard Hanson, October 25, 1946. 

[copyrighted] 



MUSIC FOR ENGLISH HORN AND ORCHESTRA, Op. 50 

By Edward Burlingame Hill 

Born in Cambridge, Massachusetts, September 9, 1872 



F.dward Burlingame Hill composed this piece between April nnd October, 1013. 
1 1 had its first performance March 2, 1945. 

The accompanying orchestra consists of two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets nnd 
bass clarinet, one bassoon, four horns, timpani, snare drum, triangle, piatio and 
strings. 

The music bears the dedication to Louis Speyer. 

IN composing his "Music for English Horn," Mr. Hill confesses to 
being "intimidated" by the "classic examples of the expressive 
treatment of that nostalgic instrument." But he writes: "The expres- 
sive personalities of wind instruments have always held a peculiar 
appeal to me. Hence I have composed sonatas for flute and piano, 
clarinet and piano, two sonatas for t^vo unaccompanied clarinets, as 
well as a sextet for wind instruments and piano. 

" 'Music for English Horn and Orchestra' is of the simplest struc- 
ture, consisting of two sections separated by a contrasting episode. As 
befits a piece for a solo wind instrument, the orchestral accompaniment 
is restrained, employing no trombones or tuba, but utilizing the piano 

as a background." 

[copyrighted] 

[«8 I 



"A LINCOLN PORTRAIT" 

By Aaron Copland 

Born in Brooklyn, N.Y., November 14, 1900 



Aaron Copland composed "A Lincoln Portrait" in 1942 at the suggestion of 
Andre Kostelanetz, to whom the score is dedicated and who conducted its first 
performance at a Pension Fund concert of the Cincinnati Symphony Orchestra in 
Cincinnati, May 14, 1942. It was performed at the Boston Symphony concerts 
April g, 1943 (Speaker — Will Geer) . 

The orchestration calls for wood ^vinds in twos, four horns, three trumpets, three 
trombones, tuba, percussion, harp and strings. 



I 



N THE weeks that followed our entrance into the war," Mr. Andre 
Kostelanetz has written, "I gave a great deal of thought to the 
manner in which music could be employed to mirror the magnificent 
spirit of our country. 

"The greatness of a nation is expressed through its people and those 
people who have achieved greatness are the logical subjects for a 
series of musical portraits. 

'I discussed the idea with three of our leading composers and the 
result was 'A Lincoln Portrait' by Aaron Copland, the 'Portrait for 



Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Third Pair of Concerts 

IVednesday Evenings February l6 
Saturday Afternoon^ February ig 



[23] 



Orchestra' oi Mark I'waiii, by Jerome Kern, and the portrait of Mayor 
Fiorello H. La Guardia, the fiery battler for honest civic government, 
by Virgil Thomson. 

"The qualities of courage, dignity, strength, simplicity and humor 
which are so characteristic of the American people are well represented 
in these three outstanding Americans." 

Mr. Copland explains that he had first thought of choosing for his 
musical portrait Walt Whitman, "the patron poet of all American 
composers/' but that he was persuaded by Mr. Kostelanetz to de- 
cide upon a statesman instead of a literary figure. "From that moment 
on, the choice of Lincoln as my subject seemed inevitable." 

"In discussing my choice with Virgil Thomson, he amiably pointed 
out that no composer could possibly hope to match in musical terms 
the stature of so eminent a figure as that of Lincoln. Of course, he 
was quite right. But secretly I was hoping to avoid the difficulty by 
doing a portrait in which the sitter himself might speak. With the 
voice of Lincoln to help me I was ready to risk the impossible. 

"The letters and speeches of Lincoln supplied the text. It was com- 
paratively a simple matter to choose a few excerpts that seemed par- 
ticularly apposite to our own situation today. I avoided the tempta- 
tion to use only well-known passages, permitting myself the luxury of 
quoting only once from a world-famous speech. The order and ar- 
rangement of the selections are my own. 

"The first sketches were made in February and the portrait finished 
on April i6th. The orchestration was completed a few weeks later. 

"I worked with musical materials of my own, with the exception of 
two songs of the period: the famous 'Camptown Races' and a ballad 
that was first published in 1840 under the title 'The Pesky Sarpent' 
but is better known today as 'Springfield Mountain.' In neither case 
is the treatment a literal one. The tunes are used freely, in the manner 
of my use of cowboy songs in Billy the Kid. 

"The composition is roughly divided into three main sections. In 
the opening section I wanted to suggest something of the mysterious 
sense of fatality that surrounds Lincoln's personality. Also, near the 
end of that section, something of his gentleness and simplicity of spirit. 
The quick middle section briefly sketches in the background of the 
times he lived in. This merges into the concluding section where my 
sole purpose was to draw a simple but impressive frame about the 
words of Lincoln himself." 

[copyrighted] 



(«4] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra *^^°\,^,?D^!c,y"^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto ( Heif etz ) , Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico." "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "T^a Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Flnndel Larghetto (Concerto No. 12), Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording); 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto (Soloist: William Kapell) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston .Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heif etz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf"; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe." Suite No. 2 (new recording); 

Pa vane. Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" : Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnop^die No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 : "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring." "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio ( Sanromli ) : Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, .5. 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade): Overture. "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson Overture to "Oberon" 

Vivaldi "The Testament of Freedom" 

Wagner Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Weber Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 




Paliiuiin 



The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzlcy says — 'Mt is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIN riiUVO COHPMY 

160 Boylston St., Boston . Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
BaWwih alto bu'rids ACftOSONiC, HAMILTON HOV/ARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 






BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HI 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

I 94 8 - I 949 

Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovid 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap6 
Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 

Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfiied Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 
Willem Valkeniei 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 

Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansottc 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stemburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



.^^^-^^ 



i9^4\ACi949 



I* 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Third Concert 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, February 16 

AND THE 

Third Matinee ' 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, February 19 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



ANNUAL MEETING 

of the 

Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

It is a pleasure to announce that invitations 
to attend the Annual Meeting of the Friends of the 
Orchestra will be extended this year to all who con- 
tribute to the Serge Koussevitzky Fund of the Or- 
chestra before February 26, 1^4^. The meeting will 
be held at Symphony Hall on Wednesday, March 
2nd, at four o'clock. By that time it is confidently 
hoped that the Fund, which, after three months, 
now stands at $130,000, will exceed $200,000. Such 
a showing would indeed amount to tangible evi- 
dence to Dr. Koussevitzky at the meeting of our 
devotion to him and our determination to stand 
steadfastly behind the Orchestra. 

A special program has been arranged by 
Dr. Koussevitzky to follow the meeting, and at 
the conclusion of the music the Trustees and 
Dr. Koussevitzky will receive our members at tea 
in the upper foyer. 

. Your generous support before February 26 
this year, either by gift or pledge, would be of 
tremendous help. 

Edward A. Taft 

Chairman, Anniversary Fund 

Gifts to the Anniversary Fund will constitute enroll- 
ment in the Society for the current season. Checks 
may he drawn payable to Boston Symphony 'Orches- 
tra and may be mailed to Fund Headquarters at 
Symphony Hall, Boston 75. Such gifts are tax de- 
ductible. 



C«] 



^NNO UN CEMENT 

Instead of the Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra 
the following will be played: 

Stravinsky — Concerto for Piano and Wind Or- 
chestra (with double basses) 

I. Lento: Allegro; Lento 

IL Larghissimo 

IIL Finale: Allegro 

Wednesday Evening, February 16 



Carnegie Hall, New York 
Sixty-third Season in Ne\v York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



STRAVINSKY. . 



THIRD EVENING CONCERT 
WEDNESDAY, February i6 



IGOR STRAVINSKY Conducting 

Ode in Three Parts, for Orchestra 

Eulogy 

Eclogue 

Epitaph 

Capriccio, for Piano and Orchestra 

I. Presto 
II. Andante rapsodico • 

III. Allegro capriccioso, ma tempo giusto 
(Played without pause) 

INTERMISSION 

Concerto in D for String Orchestra 

I. Vivace 
II. Arioso: Andantino . 
III. Rondo: Allegro 

Orpheus, Ballet in Three Scenes 

Orpheus weeps for Eurydice — Dance air — Dance of 
the Angel of Death — Interlude; Second Scene — Dance 
of the Furies — Dance Air (Orpheus) — "Pas d'Action" 
— "Pas-de-deux" — "Pas dAction"; Third Scene — 
Apotheosis of Orpheus 

{First concert performance in New York) 



SOLOIST 

SOULIMA STRAVINSKY 



i 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library-. 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Network (Station WNBC) Tuesday, 11:30-12:00 P.M. 



[31 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelifone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe. 1 .00 

Fidelitohe Floating Point 50c 

rCKIflU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY BASS 
RECORDS 

Among the many reviews of the new 
album of double bass recordings by 
Serge Koussevitzky, the following are 
quoted'- 

Claudia Cassidy (in the Chicago 
Tribune) : 

"Collectors in search of Serge Kous- 
sevitzky's double bass recordings are 
being rescued by a series of circum- 
stances. Perhaps you remember that 
when Boston asked its renowned con- 
ductor what he wanted in token of ad- 
miration and affection in the 25th and 
farewell season, he said he wanted "a 
big gift" for his orchestra. That gift 
was a backlog of financial security, and 
the fast growing Serge Koussevitzky 
Anniversary fund is the result. To 
augment it, a limited edition of 1,000 
albums of Koussevitzky recordings has 
been made available by the Boston or- 
chestra in cooperation with RCA Victor. 
Each is autographed, holds the portrait 
of the player with his instrument now 
hanging in Koussevitzky's Tanglewood 
home, and features three 12-inch, ruby 
vinylite records of the slow movement 
from Koussevitzky's double bass con- 
certo, his Chanson Triste and Valse 
Miniature, and his arrangement of a 
largo by Eccles, plus a lullaby by Laska. 
The recordings were made in 1929, and 
you have to hear what they can do with 
the double bass to believe it. Pierre 
Luboshutz is the accompanist. The price 
is $10, including mailing costs. Address 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Sym- 
phony Hall, Boston 15." 

Jay C. Rosenfeld (in the Berkshire 
Eagle) : 

"Immediately discernible are the at- 
tributes which make orchestral music 
under his direction so absorbing; a 
magnificent conception of line, a con- 
tinuously glowing tone and the peerless 
faculty of maintaining and re-instilling 
vigorous urgency in the music. Except 
for a propensity to make his shifts and 
slides very noticeable, the mechanics 
of the playing are formidable. His in- 
tonation has the character associated 
with Casals and Heifetz, the tone has 
a vivid warmth and the bowing the un- 
canny amplitude of those masters who 
know the secret of preserving intensity 
without expending all their resources. 



[4] 



"ODE," IN Three Parts for Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, June 17, il 



The Ode was composed for the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, Inc., and is dedi- 
cated to the memory of Mme. Natalie Koussevitzky. It was first performed bv the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, October 8, 1943. 

It is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, t^\o bassoons, 
four horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. 

THE composer has provided this explanation: "I was asked by the 
Koussevitzky Music Foundation to compose a symphonic piece 
which I have called 'Ode.' The Ode is a chant in three parts for 
orchestra. It is an appreciation of Natalie Koussevitzky's spiritual con- 
tribution to the art of the eminent conductor, her husband. Dr. Serge 
Koussevitzky. 

'Tart I. 'Eulogy,' praise, a song in sustained melody with accom- 
paniment, the whole in fugal treatment. 

"Part II. 'Eclogue,' a piece in lively mood, a kind of concert 
champetre, suggesting out-of-door music, an idea cherished by Nat- 
alie Koussevitzky and brilliantly materialized at Tanglewood by her 
husband. 

"Part III. 'Epitaph,' an inscription, serein air, closes this memorial 
triptych." 

[copyrighted] 



CAPRICCIO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 

By Igor Stravinsky 
Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, June 17, 1882 



Stravinsky began to compose his Capriccio at Christmas of 1928 and completed 
it by the end of September 1929. The first performance was at a concert of the 
Orchestre Symphonique de Paris, on December 6 following, Ansermet conducting, 
and the composer playing the piano solo. The first performance in America was 
at a concert of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, December 19, 1930, Jesus Maria 
Sanromd taking the piano part. The same Orchestra and soloist introduced the 
work to New York, February 7, 1931, and repeated it in Boston, under the com- 
poser's direction, December 1, 1939. 

The orchestration is as follows: wood winds in threes, four horns, two trumpets, 
three trombones and tuba, timpani, and strings. 

STRAVINSKY, appearing as piano soloist in various European cities, 
decided that it would be advisable to have another work of his 
own than the Piano Concerto, which he had performed innumerable 
times. "That is why I wrote another concerto," he tells us in his auto- 
biography, "which I called 'Capriccio,' that name seeming to indicate 
best the character of the music. I had in mind the definition of a 

[51 



capriccio given by Praetorius, the celebrated musical authority of the 
seventeenth century.* He regarded it as a synonym of the fantasia, 
which was a free form made up of fugato instrumental passages. This 
form enabled me to develop my music by the juxtaposition of episodes 
of various kinds which follow one another and by their very nature 
give the piece that aspect of caprice from which it takes its name. 

"There is little wonder that, while working at my Capriccio, I 
should find my thoughts dominated by that prince of music, Carl 
Maria von Weber, whose genius admirably lent itself to this manner. 
Alas! no one thought of calling him a prince in his lifetime!" 

The composer uses the solo string quartet, but merely as a part of 
the accompanying orchestra. "The name Capriccio/' writes the pro- 
gram annotator for the B. B. C. Concerts in London, "of course 
allows a composer a good deal of freedom, but this work has, none 
the less, a formality of its own, consistently designed. Each movement 
has its own motive, and they are bound together in a certain unity. 
The characteristic theme of the Capriccio is the arpeggio of G minor, 
played marcato but not forte, by the pianoforte with a rhythmic sup- 
port from timpani, near the beginning of the first movement. It 
decides the character of the first movement, and gives birth to a num- 
ber of the succeeding themes, built up somewhat on the plan of an 
overture. It is preceded by an Introduction interchanging between 
Presto and Doppio movimento (used here to mean twice as slow, not 
twice as fast) , and the Introduction is brought in again to form the 
close of the movement. The Presto depends largely for its effect on 
trills, with rushing scales in the orchestral strings, and the Doppio 
movimento has a theme for the string quartet. The main body of the 
movement never slackens speed, from the arpeggio figure with which 
the soloist begins until the introduction returns at the end. Concise in 
itself, it makes use for the most part of short themes, several of them 
clearly akin to that arpeggio motive. 

"Rapsodico gives the clue to the second movement, and in it, the 
idea of a capriccio is most clearly realized. It begins with a dialogue 
between the soloist and the wood winds, and the texture is slighter 
than in the first movement: except for one or two short passages, the 
string quartet has no separate existence apart from the strings as a 
whole. The pianoforte closes the movement with a cadenza, lightly 
accompanied in its last three bars. The capricious character of the 
piece is clearly foreshadowed by the soloist's opening. 

"The movement leads straight into the last, a moto perpetuo, based 
largely on an insistent arpeggio of G major, and the two chief sub- 
jects built up above it have something of the character of the subject 
and counter-subject of a fugue. And their reappearances, interchanged 
between soloist and orchestra, may remind the listener of rondo form." 

* Not the "eierhteenth century," as erroneously quoted in the English translation. 

f rop>Rir.HTFr> I 



[6] 



SOULIMA STRAVINSKY 



SouLiMA Stravinsky was born at Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1910, the 
year The Fire Bird was composed. He has been the pupil of Isidor 
Philipp and Nadia Boulanger. He made his debut as a pianist at the 
age of twenty in a concert tour of France and Switzerland. In 1934 he 
appeared in Paris, playing both the Concerto with Wind Instruments, 
and the Capriccio of Stravinsky, while his father conducted. Touring 
with his father, he has also played with him in the Concerto for T^vo 
Pianofortes. He gave a recital in Los Angeles last September. 



CONCERTO IN D for String Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, June 17, 1882 



The score is signed "Hollywood, August 8, 1946," and was first performed by 
Paul Sacher* and the Chamber Orchestra of Basel, January 21, 1947. It is dedi- 
cated to this orchestra and its leader. The piece was introduced in this country 
by Fritz Reiner, conducting the Pittsburgh Orchestra, January 16, 1948. It has 
been performed in San Francisco and Mexico City under the composer's direction, 
and by the New York Philharmonic Symphony Society under the direction of 
Leopold Stokowski. 

STRAVINSKY, wTiting to Sacher and attempting to describe the music, 
was at a loss to provide helpful verbal information about what 
may easily be perceived in the music itself. Neverthless, it can be 
pointed out that in the first movement, a Vivace in 6/8 rhythm, the 
strings are divided in the development. The solo viola and violin are 
set against the orchestral body. This movement is the longest. The 
second, an arioso andantino, 4/4, consists of only forty-three bars. 
The final rondo allegro continues in the concerto grosso style upon 
which the whole work is based. 

Remarks about the Concerto by Charles Stuart (in Tempo, sum- 
mer, 1948) are a retort to critical reviews which the piece encountered 
in London: 

"The salient quality of the Concerto in D is its unity in variety, 
the way in which its disparate bits and pieces key into each other, 
forming a valid whole. It is true that Stravinsky picks up one musical 
idea, puts it down and picks up another. This practice has been 



* Works composed for Paul Sacher and his orchestra include Arthur Honegger's Symphony 
for Strings, Martinu's Toccata and Two Canzone, Strauss's Metamorphoseon, Martin's 
Petite Symphonie Concertante, of which all but the second have been performed at Boston 
Symphony concerts. 

[7I 



cited recently as a proof of his musical impotence. It happens to be 
the practice also of Bach, Mozart and the Irreproachables generally. It 
happens to be the way in which all good music is written. 

" 'But/ objects the critic, 'the successive or alternating ideas of 
Bach and Mozart fit together and make a pattern. Those of Stravin- 
sky don't.' 

"To people with a deaf spot for Stravinsky's harmonic and rhythmic 
idioms, every page the man writes must of necessity be meaningless. 
It is the deaf spot that is to blame, not Stravinsky. Let me say in 
passing that nothing gives a musician more pride and pleasure than 
his deaf spots. He cultivates them anxiously. He is virtuous about 
them. They are his solace and cherished asset. It is so elating to be 
dogmatic and damnatory about music you never really hear and can 
never hope to understand. 

"But for some of us, whose ears in this matter are unspotted and 
whole, the Stravinsky idiom, his bar-to-bar texture, the 'feel' of his 
orchestration, the tension and tang of his part-writing, are matters 
of beauty in their own right. And to our way of thinking the musical 
ideas in the average Stravinsky piece are logically sequent and 
cohesive. 

"Which brings me back to the Concerto in D. The scudding, busy 
finale (a Rondo in name though not conspicuously by nature) is 
a cogent reply to the opening Vivace, a quick movement of quite 
different cut and purport; and the elegant middle movement (Arioso) 
replies with equal cogency to both. The Vivace is structurally the 
most complex movement of the three. No doubt the Deaf Spots are 
bewildered here by the moderato middle section. From the chatter and 
flow of innocent 6/8 triplets we plunge into a shadowed half-world 
of syncopation, the harmonies tart yet not without perfume. This 
episode is not only exciting in its own terms: it is also complementary, 
a signal proof of precisely that architectonic faculty which Stravinsky 
has been declared to lack." 

[ COPYRIGHTED 1 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

CONCERT BY CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA 

Malcolm H. Holmes, Conductor 

and 

CONSERVATORY CHORUS 

LoRNA Cooke deVaron, Conductor 

BRUCKNER MASS IN E minor 

Jordan Hall, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, February 16 and 17 

at 8:15 p.m. 
Tickets for reserved floor seats free at Jordan Hall Box Office. 



f 8] 



ORPHEUS, BALLET IN THREE SCENES 
Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, on June 17, 1882 



The score of this ballet bears the signature at the end "Hollvwood, September 23, 
1947." It was introduced by the Ballet Society at the New York City Center, April 
28, 1948. The choreography was by George Balanchine, the decor by Isamu Noguchi. 
The part of Orpheus was danced bv Nicholas Magallanes, Euridice bv Maria 
Tallchief. 

The orchestra called for includes: two flutes and piccolo, t^vo oboes and English 
horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, t^vo trumpets, three trombones, 
timpani, harp and strings. 

The music, which includes the entire ballet, is here presented for the first time 
as a concert number. 

THE indications on the score are as follows: First scene: Orpheus 
weeps for Euridice. He stands motionless with his back to the 
audience. Friends pass bringing presents and offer him sympathy. — 
Air de Danse (Andante con moto). — Dance of the Angel of Death. 

— Interlude (The angel and Orpheus reappear in the gloom of 
Tartarus) . 

Second scene: Pas des Furies (their agitation and their threats) — 
Air de Danse (Orpheus) — Interlude (The tormented souls in Tar- 
tarus stretch out their fettered arms towards Orpheus, and implore 
him to continue his song of consolation.) — Air de Danse (Orpheus 

— Grave) — Pas d' Action (Andantino leggiadro — Hades, moved by 
the song of Orpheus, grows calm. The Furies surround him, bind his 
eyes, and return Euridice to him.) — Pas de deux (Andante sostenuto 

— Orpheus and Euridice beforfe the veiled curtain) — Interlude 
(Veiled curtain, behind which the decor of the first scene is placed) 

— Pas d' Action (Vivace — The Bacchantes attack Orpheus, seize him, 
and tear him to pieces) . 

Third scene: Apotheosis of Orpheus (Lento sostenuto) . Apollo 
appears. He wrests the lyre from Orpheus and raises his song heaven- 
wards. 

The following description of the ballet was contributed by Arthur 
V. Berger to Musical America: 

"The most striking aspect of Stravinsky's music for Orpheus is, 
perhaps, its repose, its tenderness. It is another masterpiece in the line 
of dramatic works that occupy a towering position among current 
musical achievements. For those of us who know Persephore, based 
on a similar subject, it is more or less what we should expect in 
grandeur and nobility from his treatment of the Orpheus legend. 
But since Persephone is so lamentably neglected, the peculiarly Gallic 
languor of the new score may come as a surprise, and even the more 
limited circle of admirers is aware of an extension of this quality in 
Orpheus. Apollon Musagete, too, which likewise comes to mind, is 
more sculptural by comparison. It is this quality of renewal that is 
among the things determining Stravinsky's position as the first creative 
musician of our time. 





Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bri 
you wealth of their greatest performances fci 
encore after encore! Among them: 

• Egmont Overture, Op. 84 — Beethoven. The Boston Sy^^ 
phony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. 12-0288, $1.' 

• Symphony No. 4, in A, Op. 90 ("Italian") — Mendelssor- 
The Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Corz 
RCA Victor Album DM-1259, $4.75. 

THE WORLD'S 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs through 
the ^'Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor "Crestwood"! Hear 

your treasured recordings brilliantly reproduced! De luxe automatic record 
changer with ^*Silent Sapphire" permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short- 
wave radio. AC Victrola 8V151. ''Victrola" — T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 




HAVE YOU HB 



[lO] 




IGOR STRAVINSKY 



• Divertimento — Stravinsky. Igor Stravinsky conducting the 

, RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra. Album DM-1202, $4.75. 

' Danses Concertantes — Stravinsky. Included as find side: 

Scherzo a la Russe — Stravinsky. Igor Stravinsky conducting 

the RCA Victor Chamber Orchestra and the RCA Victor Sym- 

: phony Orchestra. Album DM-1234, $4.75. 

■':es are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclu- 
■ local taxes. Price of single record does not include Federal 
• >' !e tax. i"DM" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 
«*ro.) 

:VTEST ARTISTS ARE f FM J 

iV\CIOK'Hmk 



tf^t) 



HE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



[iM 



"The restraint of Orpheus is underhned by its sparse orchestration. 
Only for a few measures is there a tutti — when the Bacchantes launch 
their final attack on Orpheus. The moment he falls, the orchestra 
subsides. The isolated tutti is as commanding a stroke as Mozart's 
introduction of the previously tacit trombones in the Statue Scene 
of Don Giovanni. Stravinsky's chord for this tutti — A minor with an 
acidulous G-sharp in the bass — is one of those inspirational twists 
(like the opening chord of the Symphonie de Psaumes) he often gives 
traditional harmonies through well separated notes over an enormous 
pitch range. 

"The Bacchantes scene is the only one confining itself to the more 
typically Stravinskyan, peremptory, interrupted rhythms. Otherwise, 
there is almost continuous, beautifully flowing melodic line. There 
are even tunes for those who must have them to hum as they leave 
the hall. One in particular, in the way it is underscored, easily serves 
this end. By the same token it fills a strategic dramatic function by 
serving as the strain through which Orpheus moves the Furies. In F 
minor, conventionally modulating to subdominant, it has ornaments 
that inevitably, in the present dramatic context, have suggested Gluck. 
But I think it has Baroque evocations too, and later in the English 
horn, canonically answering the harp, it even suggests Tchaikovsky. 
Precisely its universality as melody, as a sounding-board for the lyricism 
of all time, makes it at once easily accessible to a listener and an in- 
genious symbol for Orpheus, who is, after all, in antique mythology, 
music's epitome. 

"Whereas in Apollo and Persephone the complexity of the melodic 
lines themselves often establishes a uniqueness that is not always 
present in this score, here the complexity is provided by the way in 
which the melodies are among many strands woven contrapuntally — 
intertwining and disentangling in the way that Balanchine's dancers 
do. 

"The contrapuntal voices, at times canonic and even fugal, would 
often clash bitterly if it were not for the astonishing, softening effect 
of the instrumentation, which gives different timbre to each of two 
clashing tones. As in the case of the orchestral tutti that determines 
the one climax, here again it is suggested that orchestral coloring may 
actually be an organic dimension. The instrument seems to have been 
selected first in each instance, and only subsequently the tones through 
which it is deployed. 

"A counterpoint of two instruments is a recurrent device: two 
bassoons in the middle of the vernal scene of the first tableau; two 
oboes for the pleading theme of Orpheus among the Furies; two horns 
for the Apotheosis in fugal entrances of a motive which, representing 
the union of Orpheus and Euridice in death, appropriately refers to 
their earlier Pas de Deux. The prominence of the harp, which also 
fascinated Stravinsky in the Symphony in Three Movements, need, of 
course, not be accounted for in a score for Orpheus. The impressionistic 
arpeggiated strumming the harp usually brings in its wake when other 
composers score for it gives way here to exquisitely precise lines that 
take part in the counterpoint." 

[copyrighted] 



[12] 



CAHMGI?: HALL 
Third Afternoon Concert 
Saturday, Fe'hruary 19 
CHANGS OF PRCGPJ^M BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Instead of the Concerto for Piano and Wind Orchestra, the following will be played; 

Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra ---»---i^-. Stravinsky 

1, Presto ] 

2, Andante rapsodico ] (played without pause) 

3, Allegro capriccioso, ma tempo giusto ] 



■ . / 



Carnegie Hall 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



THIRD AFTERNOON CONCERT 

SATURDAY, February 19 




Stravinsky 



Program 

IGOR STRAVINSKY Conducting 

Ode in Three parts, for Orchestra 

Eulogy 
Eclogue 
Epitaph 

Concerto' for Piano and Wind Orchestra (with Double- 
Basses) 

I. Lento; Allegro; Lento 
II. Larghissimo 
III. Finale: Allegro 

INTERMISSION 

Concerto in D for String Orchestra 

I. Vivace 
11. Arioso: Andantino 
III. Rondo: Alleero 

Orpheus, Ballet in Three Scenes 

Orpheus weeps for Eurydice — Dance air — Dance of 
the Angel of Death — Interlude; Second Scene — Dance 
of the Furies — Dance Air (Orpheus) — "Pas d'Action" 
— "Pas-de-deux" — "Pas d'Action"; Third Scene — 
Apotheosis of Orpheus 



SOLOIST 

SOULIMA STRAVINSKY 



BALDWIN PIANO 



VICTOR RECORDS 



The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library. 



f'Sl 



"ODE," IN Three Parts for Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 



(For Notes See Page 5) 



CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND WIND ORCHESTRA (with 
Double Basses and Timpani) 

By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, on June 17, 1882 



Composed in 1923-1924, this concerto had its first performance at a Concert 
Koussevitzky in Paris on May 22 of the latter year, the composer taking the piano 
part. Its first performance in this country was given by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra, January 23, 1925, again with Serge Koussevitzky as conductor and the com- 
poser as pianist. The accompaniment is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes 
and English horn, two clarinets, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, four 
trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, and double basses. The score is 
dedicated to Natalie Koussevitzky. 

STRAVINSKY tclls US in his Autobiography how he composed his first 
work in the concerto form in the period of the Wind Octet, when 
the possibilities of wind color unmixed were absorbing his attention. 
He finished the score at Biarritz in April and Koussevitzky, on seeing 
it, urged him to undertake the solo part. "I hesitated at first," he 
writes, "fearing that I should not have time to perfect my technique 
as a pianist, to practice enough, and to acquire the endurance neces- 
sary to execute a work demanding sustained effort; but as I am by 
nature always tempted by anything needing prolonged effort, and 
prone to persist in overcoming difficulties, and as also the prospect of 
creating my work for myself and thus establishing the manner in 
which I wished it to be played, greatly attracted me, these influences 
combined to induce me to undertake it." 

After limbering his fingers on Czerny exercises, the composer ap- 
proached the date of performance more than tolerably equipped, 
but not without stage fright, not having adjusted himself to the neces- 
sity of keeping alert to his cues while his attention tended to drift 
to what was happening "in various parts of the orchestra. ... I re- 
member at my debut being seized by just such a lapse of memory, 
though it fortunately had no dire results. Having finished the first 
part of my concerto, just before beginning the Largo which opens 
with a piano solo, I suddenly realized that I had entirely forgotten 

fM] 



how it started. I whispered this to Koussevitzky. He glanced at the 
score and whispered the first notes. That was enough to restore my 
balance and enable me to attack the Largo." Stravinsky presently over- 
came his fears. He reserved the concerto for his own performance 
and played it in many a city under many a notable conductor, pre- 
sumably wdthout mishap, as often as forty times, a number which 
he proudly records in his book. 

The composer has described his Concerto as "a sort of passacaglia 
or toccata. It is quite in the style of the 17th century — that is the 
17th century viewed from the standpoint of today." It was his first 
essay in the concertante manner, a style which he has since much 
cultivated. At the time he stoutly defended his aesthetic plan of using 
the orchestre d'harmonie, or wind orchestra, wdth the piano, "as an 
instrumental body more appropriate to the tone of the piano." As is 
well known, he did not adhere to this principle, having since showm 
no reluctance in combining the piano with strings. Stravinsky's crea- 
tive career has been an unceasing adventure in tonal possibilities and 
tonal combinations. 

The following analysis appeared in the program book of the Paris 
concert when the concerto was first performed. 

The Concerto is in three movements; and these movements are 
themselves divided as follows: The first movement consists of (a) 
Lento; (b) Allegro; (c) Maestoso. The second movement, after the 
opening Largo, introduces a cadenza (Poco rubato) , ^v^hich is linked 
with a melodic section, followed by a second melody, the last two 
being stated in a very compact manner. The cadenza then returns, and 
the movement ends with a variant of the Largo passage at the begin- 
ning of the movement, which in this place represents rather a con- 
tinuation of the cadenza. 

The concluding measure of the second movement serves also as 
the subject of the Fugato with w^hich the Finale begins (Allegro, 2-4) . 
The subject, assuming several forms, is heard sometimes in the piano 
part, sometimes in the orchestra, in a slower movement (doubled) , 
although the time-value of the metronomic base does not vary. A 
short melodic episode follow^s, giving place to another, in imitation. 
This is succeeded by a brief, rhythmic period (tutti) , with a counter- 
point for the piano, ending in a kind of Stretto. This last is brusquely 
interrupted by a reminiscence (Lento, 2-4) of the slow movement and, 
further on, of the music with which the Concerto began. A pause 
separates this return of the opening martial movement from the eight 
measures which conclude the Concerto — a stringendo passage (forte, 
marcatissimo) for the piano, over a syncopated accompaniment in the 
orchestra. 

[copyrighted] 



[15] 



SKETCH OF SOLOIST 



(See Page 7) 



CONCERTO IN D for String Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 



(For Notes See Page 7) 



ORPHEUS, BALLET IN THREE SCENES 
By Igor Stravinsky 



(For Notes See Page 9) 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 
840 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 
246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 

25 Blagden Street, Boston, Mass. 

[i6] 



^EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




Th« EMPLOYEBS' UmbOity Atnimte* Cerpomiom Ud. 
Tb« EMPLOTEBS' Pin Ituunnet Company 
AMESICAN EMPLOTEBS' ImtMnaet Campamy 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. iWiy not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are firetraps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." ??hy don't they have fire alarm systems . . . as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 





Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



I 17 J 











1 


■|Sl||^ 


B 








^^m^^s^ 




^./'■J ^ 4l 


^'%'' 1 


^; ■/:*%:;., ^^' 


^^-#-. 








1 -^. 




1* «c*- ^^- 




'%^^^ " '** ** 


mM 


k*v 




m 














[M^^^ 






p^;- - ^% » >^ ^ If" 






.fcTM 



«n:m 












Jr.*««i; 



Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Fourth Pair oflConcerts 

Wednesday Evenings March l6 
Saturday Afternoon^ March ig 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

**A Musical Education in One Volume" 
''Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Gilman in the 

N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.00 per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



• THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 

CONCERT BULLETIN 

• THE BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 

PROGRAM 

• THE BOSTON POPS PROGRAM 

(rV3 

The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra 

PUBLICATIONS 

Offer to advertisers, at moderate rates, 
coverage of extensive, discerning audi- 
ences. All spaces are in eye-catching 
positions near the descriptive notes, 
which are widely read. 



Total Circulation More Than 500,000 



For Information and Rates Call 

Mrs. Dana Somes, Advertising Manager 

Tel. CO 6-1492, or write: 

Symphony Hall, Boston 15, Mags. 



[19I 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evening July 16 

Sunday afternoon July 17 

Saturday evening July 23 

Sunday afternoon July 24 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28 

Saturday evening July 30 

Sunday afternoon July 31 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening August 1 1 

Saturday evening .August 13 

Sunday afternoon August 14 



Extra concerts 
(Bach-Mozart- 
Haydn- 
Schubert) 



SERIES A 



SERIES B 



SERIES G 



For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, apply at the sub- 
scription office in Symphony Hall. 



I" 20] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra *^^*^'^„„^,?YS^^^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E. Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4. 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoyen Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis ; 

Overture to "Egmont" 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto ; Air from "Semele" (Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto ( Soloist : William Kapell ) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Ivhovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf" ; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite ; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" ; "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chlo4," Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovltch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5; "Pohjola's Daughter"; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever." "Semper Fi ^elis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's ^lerry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio ( Sanromd ) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5. 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 




PaliittJin 



The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — "It is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIS fim COHPIM 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin o'«o builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON HOWARD pianoM and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 




BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 




SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
I 948 - I 949 

Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir ResnikofE 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodeuky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 
Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 
Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhapd 
Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 
George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 
Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon MarjoUet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakit 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem Valkeniei 
James Stagliano 

Principals 
Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 

Vinal Smith 

Harps 

Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stembuvg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fourth Concert 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, March 16 

AND THE 

Fourth Matinee 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, March 19 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The TRUSTEES of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De W^olfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

[erome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
ANNIVERSARY FUND 

of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

The goal for this appeal, which will be the only 
appeal during this Anniversary Year, is $250,000 
net after all expenses of the Orchestra for the current 
year have been met. This sum is approximately four 
times as much as the amount contributed by the 
Friends of the Orchestra during the past season. 

All who care to join in honoring Dr. Koussevitzky 
on his twenty-fifth year of service in the only 
manner he wants are invited to enroll as Friends 
of the Orchestra and Contributors to the Serge 
Koussevitzky Fund. 

To enroll, simply send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston 75. "Big" gifts and 
small will be gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 

Gifts received through March 1 total $142,050. 
Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 

FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Edward A. Taft, Chairman 

KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

All gifts to the Orchestra are tax deductible. 



[2] 



Carnegie Hall, New York 
Sixty-third Season in New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FOURTH EVENING CONCERT 
WEDNESDAY, March i6 



Program 



C. p. E. Bach Concerto in D major for Stringed Instruments 

(Arranged for Orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg) 

I. Allegro moderato 
II. Andante lento molto 
III. Allegro 

Vaughan Williams Symphony No. 6 

I. Allegro 
II. Moderato 

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace 

IV. Epilogue 

INTERMISSION 

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 

I. Andante sostenuto. Moderato con anima in movimento di Valse 
II. Andantino in modo di canzona 

III. Scherzo: pizzicato ostinato; Allegro 

IV. Finale: Allegro con fuoco 



I 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library. 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Network (Station WNBC) Monday, 11:30-12:00 P.M. 

[3] 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelifone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1.25 

Fidelitone Deluxe.. 1.00 

Fidelitone Floating Point. 50c 

rCRIflv/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE BERKSHIRE MUSIC 
CENTER, 1949 

Dr. Koussevitzky announces plans for 
the 1949 session of the Berkshire Music 
Center at Tanglewood in Lenox, next 
summer. The school will have a six- 
week session fron) July 4th to August 
14th, through the period of the Berkshire 
Festival concerts (July 16th to August 
14th). 

Dr. Koussevitzky will direct the 
school with Aaron Copland as Assistant 
Director. Additions to the Faculty in- 
clude Olivier Messiaen, the Parisian 
composer, who will make his first visit 
to America to join Aaron Copland as 
teacher of composition. The members 
of the Juilliard String Quartet (Robert 
Mann, Robert KofE, Raphael Hillyer 
and Arthur Winograd) will assist Gregor 
Piatigorsky, who will be in charge of 
Chamber Music. Twenty-five members 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra will 
also take part in this department. Among 
the faculty, together with the principals 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
will be Leonard Bernstein, Richard 
Burgin and Eleazar de Carvalho assist- 
ing Dr. Koussevitzky in the conducting 
classes and with the student orchestra. 
Hugh Ross will head the Choral De- 
partment. Robert Shaw, regularly a 
member of the Choral faculty, will be 
on leave of absence, and Mr. Ross will 
be joined by Christopher Honaas, head 
of the Music Department of Rollins 
College in Winter Park, Florida. 

There will be five departments as in 
former seasons : I Orchestral and Choral 
Conducting, II Orchestra and Chamber 
Music, III Composition, IV Opera and 
V Chorus. The Opera Department will 
include a considerably expanded Opera 
and Chamber Orchestra which will per- 
form for the opera productions and will 
give concerts from the chamber or- 
chestra repertory. There will be some 
40 school performances, including con- 
certs by all the departments, by mem- 
bers of the faculty, and visiting artists, 
and a major opera production under the 
direction of Boris Goldovsky in the tra- 
dition of Benjamin Britten's "Peter 
Grimes" (American premiere in 1946), 
Mozart's "Idomeneo" (American pre- 
miere in 1947) and Rossini's "The Turk 
in Italy" (1948). Members of the 
Friends of the Berkshire Music Center, 
an organization of contributors to the 
support of the school, are invited to 
these concerts. 



[4] 



CONCERTO IN D MAJOR FOR STRINGS 
By Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach 

Born at Weimar, March 8, 1714; died at Hamburg, December 14, 1788 

Arranged for orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg 

Born at Vilna, July 4, 1883 * 



Emanuel Bach composed this concerto for viols (with a concertino of quinton, 
viola d'amore, viola da gamba and basse da viole) . The date of composition is not 
ascertainable. The concerto was arranged by Maximilian Steinberg in igog for flute, 
two oboes (the second replaced in the slow movement by the English horn, 
labelled "oboe alto" in the score) , bassoon, horn and strings. 

DR. KoussEViTZKY became acquainted with this concerto as per- 
formed by the Society of Ancient Instruments in Paris, a set of 
viols then being used. It was at his suggestion that Maximilian Stein- 
berg made the present orchestral arrangement. 

Steinberg is known as Director of the Conservatory at Leningrad, 
in which position he succeeded Glazounov on the retirement of that 
musician. Steinberg received his musical education in this conserva- 
tory and studied under both Rimsky-Korsakov and Glazounov. He 
has composed a considerable amount of music, orchestral, vocal, 
chamber and for the stage. He married in 1908 the daughter of 
Rimsky-Korsakov, and it was for this occasion that Stravinsky, then 
a student at the Conservatory, composed his "Fireworks." 

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, second son of Maria Barbara, was 
prepared for a legal career and attended the Universities at Leipzig 
and at Frankfort-on-the-Oder. But a Bach was not easily weaned from 
the traditional profession of his kind. Though his father did not see 
fit to put this one among his numerous sons through an intensive 
musical preparation, the boy attended the Thomasschule at Leipzig 
and no doubt learned still more at home, where his receptive facul- 
ties were alert to the much music-making that went on there. Being 
left-handed, he could not have played a bowed instrument, but from 
childhood acquitted himself admirably upon the clavier or organ. 
It is told that at eleven he could glance over his father's shoulder and 
forthwith play the music he had seen. He composed profusely, even 
at this age. Completing his musical studies at Frankfort, he played 
for Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia as well as the Markgraf Friedrich 
Wilhelm, and had the reigning monarch been more musically inclined 
would probably have been installed as court musician. When the 
younger Friedrich succeeded his father in 1740 this musical enthusiast 
soon made the twenty-four-year-old Bach cembalist of the royal chapel. 

[5] 



Emanuel Bach was never very contented with his position. Frederick 
the Great, being conservative in taste, favored the compositions of 
the brothers Graun in his court, and of Johann Joachim Quantz, his 
flute master, over the more daring and provocative concertos and 
sonatas of the Bach who was nevertheless by his wide repute a dis- 
tinct ornament to the royal retinue. Bach likewise found the endless 
necessity of accompanying his monarch's performances upon the flute 
burdensome. If Frederick, who was inclined to take liberties with 
tempo, imposed his kingly word upon questions of musical taste. Bach 
would stand staunchly for his rights. Karl Friedrich Fasch, his assistant, 
reported Bach's remark that "the King might be the autocrat of his 
kingdom, but enjoyed no prescriptive pre-eminence in the realm of 
art." 

Bach sought release from his position, to which as a Prussian sub- 
ject (by marriage) he was bound. In 1767, he was at last given his 
freedom, and was promptly appointed by the Princess Amalia, the 
King's sister-in-law at Hamburg, as her Kapellmeister, For twenty-one 
years, until his death at the age of seventy-five, Emanuel Bach played 
the clavier and the organ, composed voluminously, and went down 
into history as "the Hamburg Bach." 

Sebastian Bach's organ music, in Burney's opinion, courted "what 
was new and difficult, without the least attention to nature and 
facility." His vocal writing was "dry and labored," as compared to 
the "taste" his son displayed. The writer highly praised one of 
Emanuel's twenty-two settings of the "Passion," being apparently not 
even aware that the elder Bach had himself done something note- 
worthy in that line. Nor had he anything to say for the chamber 
music of the father, giving all his attention to the son's "more elegant 
and expressive compositions." 

Burney fully appreciated the importance of Emanuel Bach's in- 
novations. "If Haydn ever looked up to any great master as a model, 
it seems to have been C. P. Em. Bach: the bold modulation, rests, 
pauses, free use of semitones, and unexpected flights of Haydn re- 
mind us frequently of Bach's early works more than of any other 
composer. . . . Em. Bach used to be censured for his extraneous 
modulation, crudities, and difficulties; but, like the hard words of 
Dr. Johnson, to which the public by degrees became reconciled, every 
German composer takes the same liberties now as Bach, and every 
English writer uses Johnson's language with impunity." 

Emanuel Bach's plain leadership in the establishing of the sonata 
form is the more impressive when one notes the veneration in which 
he was held by his successors. Haydn deliberately devoted himself to 
the assimilation of his form, and Mozart acknowledged in the strong- 
est terms the value to posterity of his book, "Search Toward the 

[6] 



Avi 



i^lTl BOOKS ON MUSIC AND MUSICIANS 








By Georges de ^aint'Voix, The greatest living authority on 
Mozart and co-author of the definitive five-volume critical 
biography of Mozart has, in this single volume, analyzed in 
detail each of Mozart's symphonies. With the aid of many 
musical examples, he has also described Mozart's development 
as a composer and has identified in many cases the very models 
from which Mozart drew his inspiration. $3.00 



eiH 




i^ij "il'lrJlPi MiYi^i 



By Herbert Weinstoch The author of Tchaikovsky and Handel 
here tells the whole brilliant and tragic story of the life and 
music of the world's greatest composer for the piano. For years 
to come this will be the standard and definitive work on Chopin. 
With eight portraits and many musical examples. $5.00 




By Ernest Hutcheson* From a lifetime's experience as a con- 
cert pianist and teacher Ernest Hutcheson has written this useful 
and delightful companion — chairside, piano-side, or bedside-- 
for the amateur pianist. It inclucies graded lists of selections, 
helpful notes regarding editions and publishers, a bibliography, 
an index, and more than 300 musical quotations from actual 
scores. $5.00 

Wherever books are sold 



Published by ALFRED A. KNOPF, New York 22 



"kf^i^ 



who will send you his spring catalogue on request ^^^f^ 



-9 



[7 1 



True Method of Clavier Playing." There is no denying that he gave 
a great initial impulsion toward a fluent and rounded style of in- 
strumental manipulation and thematic development. He was one 
of those musicians who come at a moment when a new vista in 
music is due to be opened up; lacking perhaps greatness in the full 
sense, he yet possessed enough daring and adventure to reach intui- 
tively toward the new way which is in any case on the verge of dis- 
closure. Such a composer has shaken off the shackles of outworn tra- 
dition, but he has not the stature to create a new world for that he 
has rejected. He dreams and gropes, has recourse to the intuitive art 
of improvisation — that trancelike state of mind upon which com- 
posers once relied, but which is now lost to the world. Reichardt, 
who visited Emanuel Bach at Hamburg in 1774, observed him in the 
very act of improvisation: "Bach would become lost for hours in new 
ideas and a sea of fresh modulations. . . . His soul seemed absent 
from the earth. His eyes swam as though in some delicious dream. 
His lower lip drooped over his chin, his face and form bowed ap- 
parently lifeless over the keyboard." 

[copyrightedI 



SYMPHONY NO. 6 
By Ralph Vaughan Williams 

Born in Down Ampney, Gloucestershire, England, October 12, 1872 



This Symphony had its first performance by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 
in Albert Hall, London, Sir Adrian Boult conducting, April 21, 1948. The symphony 
had its first American performance under Dr. Koussevitzky's direction at the Berk- 
shire Festival, August 7 last. 

The score calls for three flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, two 
clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, tenor saxophone, four 
horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, side drum, bass drum, 
cymbals, triangle, xylophone, two harps and strings. 

Mr. Vaughan- Williams made an analysis of his new symphony for 
the program of the Royal Philharmonic Society when it was first 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 

Refresher courses in music education and theoretical subjects; courses in 

counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 

individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-September 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 



[8] 



performed. The Englishman, as if wary of emotional commitment, 
writes technically, and takes refuge in light, deprecating touches. 

This Symphony was begun probably about 1944 and finished in 
1947. It IS scored for full orchestra including Saxophone. There are 
four movements: Allegro, Moderato, Scherzo and Epilogue. Each of 
the first three has its tail attached to the head of its neighbour. 

First Movement — Allegro 

The key of E minor is at once established through that of F minor, 
A-flat becoming G-sharp and sliding down to G natural at the half 
bar thus: — 



Ex. 1 




The last three notes of (1) are continued, rushing down and up 
again through all the keys for which there is time in two bars, all over a 
tonic pedal. Two detached chords 



Ex.2 




-^— 



I 



lead to a repetition of the opening bar, but this time the music re- 
mains in F minor and the rush up and down is in terms of the first 

phrase. While strings and wind remain busy over this the brass plays 
a passage which becomes important later on 



Ex.3 




n^ ^^F 



*d — ^^^=<^ i 



m=^ 



Z^T==i: 



=R;3: 



i—p-r 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 



TEACHER OF SINGING 
Symphony Chambers 



246 Huntington Avenue 



Boston, Massachusetts 



Accredited in the art of sinKing: by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 



Studio: Kenmore 6-9485 



Residence: Maiden 2-6390 



[9] 



The fussy semiquavers continue in the bass while the treble has a new 
tune in the cognate key of C minor 



Ex.4 




;^fef 



— I- 



^ if* 






etc. 



Then the position is reversed and the treble fusses while the bass has 
the tune. This leads us back to our tonic pedal and the instruments 
rush around as at the beginning. Thus ends the first section of the 
movement. The next section starts with this persistent rhythm:— 



Ex.5 ^ 



^1 



Over this trumpets, flutes and clarinets play a tune in cross-rhythm 
which starts thus 



t:x.6"^5E^'E 



^=5: 



:t^E 



5^S^3 



[(9- 



pm 



._! t__zq , 1_ 



:^3 






etc. 



This continues for a considerable time with some incidental references 
to Ex. 3 and is followed by a new tune while the persistent rhythm 

persists. 



Fx.7 



i^J^^i 



rr-^z^rzzi 



=P==fc 



irzziu 



^^#24* 



m 



Then we are given a further installment of Ex. 6*. The brass now plays 
Ex. 7 very loud and this brings us to, what I believe the professional 
Annotator would call the "reprise in due course." As a matter of fact 
this reprise is only hinted at, just enough to show that this is a Sym- 
phony and not a symphonic poem. But I am not sure that the "due 
course" is well and truly followed when we find the tune Ex. 7 
played for yet a third time (this time in E major) quietly by the 
strings accompanied by harp chords. To make an end and just to 
show that after all the movement is in E minor, there is an enlarge- 
ment of the opening bar. 



Second Movement — Moderato 

This leads on from the first movement without a break. The prin- 
cipal theme is based on this rhythm 



Ex.84 



(jTj ^ /J :\ni^ ^ j^j Ji 



etc. 



sometimes "straight" and sometimes in cross-rhythm. A flourish fol- 

[10] 



lows, first on the brass loud, then on the woodwind loud and then 
soft on the strings. 



Ex.9 



i^E^. 



*«=t=t?=?=f=t=^ 



3:T-r-a 



is 






Between each repetition there is a unison passage for strings 



Ex. 10 #^^=J 



A=^t=^--- 



-^^^mm^^ 



The strings continue softly, but before they have finished the trumpets 
enter with this figure taken from the opening theme 



Ex. 11 



^- -^ -#- 



The trumpets start almost inaudibly, but they keep hammering away 
at their figure for over forty bars getting louder and louder. Mean- 
while the rest of the Orchestra have been busy chiefly with the melody 
though not the rhythm of the opening theme. Having reached its 
climax the music dies down. The Cor Anglais plays a bit of Ex. lo 
and this leads direct to the Third Movement. 

Third Movement — Scherzo 

This may be possibly best described as fugal in texture but not in 
structure. The principal subject does not appear at the beginning. 
Various instruments make bad shots at it and after a bit it settles down 
as 



Ex. 12 S^ 



'^iE3EBB 



z^ttit-rt^a: 



EzizE-±=f-Ni=i: 



I 



It: 



With this is combined a trivial little tune, chiefly on the higher wood- 
wind. 



-I 1 1 — !-— ' — Tp~^ i 1— ' — ^' • 



;^=^ 




An episodical tune is played on the Saxophone and is repeated loud 
by the full orchestra. 

Ex. 14 






[^n 



(Constant Lambert tells us that the only thing to do with a folk- 
tiine is to play it soft and repeat it loud. This is not a folk tune but 
the same difficulty seems to crop up) . 

When the episode is over the woodwind experiment as to how the 
fugue subject will sound upside down but the brass are angry and in- 
sist on playing it the right way up, so for a bit the two go on to- 
gether and to the delight of everyone including the composer the two 
versions fit, so there is nothing to do now but to continue, getting 
more excited till the episode tune comes back very loud and twice 
as slow. Then once more we hear the subject softly upside down and the 
Bass clarinet leads the way to the last movement. 

Fourth Movement — Epilogue 

It is very difficult to describe this movement analytically. It is 
directed to be played very soft throughout. The music drift's about 
contrapuntally with occasional whiffs of theme such as 



Ex.15 




z#=q! 



i^i^: 



— h^ji_i — I — p 



:t=^E 



with one or two short episodes such as this, on the horns 



Ex 16 



:^ — V 



3=^=^= 






^ 



i^i 



^=1 






and this on the oboe 




-tt*: 



|i^ 



^- 



— r 



p:==ii:t: 



Pi- 



:#*: 



etc. 



At the very end the strings cannot make up their minds whether 
to finish in E-flat major or E minor. They finally decide on E minor 
which is, after all, the home key. 

The Composer wishes to acknowledge with thanks the help of Mr. 
Roy Douglas in preparing the orchestral score. R V W 

[copyrighted] 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 

25 Blagden Street, Boston, Mass. 



[12] 



5VMPHONY IN F MINOR, NO. 4, Op. 36 

By Peter Iligh Tchaikovsky 

Born at Votkinski, in the government of Viatka, Russia, May 7, 1840; 
died at St. Petersburg, November 6, 1893 



The Fourth Symphony, composed in 1877, was first performed by the Russian 
Musical Society in Moscow, February 22, 1878. 

The orchestration includes two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two 
bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, 
cymbals, triangle, and strings. 

TriE year 1877 was a critical one in Tchaikovsky's life. He suffered 
a serious crisis, and survived it through absorption in his art, 
through the shaping and completion of his Fourth Symphony. 

The dramatic conflict and emotional voice of this symphony and 
the two that followed somehow demand a programme. It may be 
wortn inquiring to what extent the Fourth Symphony may have been 
conditioned by his personal life at the time. Tchaikovsky admitted 
the implication of some sort of programme in the Fourth. He volun- 
tarily gave to the world no clue to any of the three, beyond the mere 
word "Paiheiique" for the last, realizing, as he himself pointed out, 
the complete failure of words to convey the intense feeling which 
found its outlet, and its only outlet, in tone. He did indulge in a 
fanciful attempt at a programme for the Fourth, writing confidentially 
to Mme. von Meek, in answer to her direct question, and at the end 
of the same letter disqualified this attempt as inadequate. These para- 
giaphs, nevertheless, are often quoted as the official gospel ot the 
symphony, without Tchaikovsky's postscript of dismissal. It would 
be a good deal more just to the composer to quote merely a single 
sentence which he wrote to Taneiev: "Of course my symphony is pro- 
gramme music, but it would be impossible to give the programme in 
words; it would appear ludicrous and only raise a smile." The pro- 
gramme devolves upon the cyclic brass theme of ''inexorable fate" 
which opens the work and recurs at the end. Again, a fragmentary 
sketch of a programme for the Fifth Symphony has been recently 
discovered, in which "fate" is found once more. The word, to most 
of those who read it, is probably a rather vague abstraction. It would 
be more to the point to know what it meant to the composer himself. 
As a matter of fact, the months in which Tchaikovsky worked out 
this symphony he was intensely unhappy — there was indeed a dread 
shadow hanging over his life. He uses the word significantly in a 
letter to Mme. von Meek, acquainting her with his intention to 
marry a chance admirer whom he scarcely knew and did not love 
(the reason he gave to his benefactress and confidante was that he 
could not honorably withdraw from his promise). "We cannot escape 



our fate," he said in his letter, "and there was something fatalistic 
about my meeting with this girl." Even if this remark could be con- 
sidered as something more sincere than an attempt to put a face upon 
his strange actions before his friend, it is inconceivable that the un- 
fortunate episode (which according to recently published letters was 
more tragic than has been supposed) could have been identified in 
Tchaikovsky's mind with this ringing and triumphant theme.* Let 
the psychologists try to figure out the exact relation between the 
suffering man and his music at this time. It is surely a significant fact 
that this symphony, growing in the very midst of his trouble, was a 
saving refuge from it, as Tchaikovsky admits more than once. He 
never unequivocally associated it with the events of that summer, for 
his music was to him a thing of unclouded delight always, and the 
days which gave it birth seemed to him as he looked back (in a letter 
to Mme. von Meek of January 25, 1878) "a strange dream; something 
remote, a weird nightmare in which a man bearing my name, my 
likeness, and my consciousness acted as one acts in dreams: in a mean- 
ingless, disconnected, paradoxical way. That was not my sane self, 
in possession of logical and reasonable will-powers. Everything^ I then 
did bore the character of an unhealthy conflict between will and in- 
telligence, which is nothing less than insanity." It was his music, 
specifically his symphony to which he clung in desperation, that re- 
stored his "sane self." 

Let those who protest that Tchaikovsky fills his music with his per- 
sonal troubles examine the facts of his life. Rasped nerves, blank, 
deadening depression, neurotic fears — these painful sensations as- 
sailed Tchaikovsky in his frequent times of stress. He turned from 
them in horror. They are not within the province of music, nor did 
he attempt to put them there. The pathological and the musical 
Tchaikovsky are two different people. The first was mentally sick, 
pitiably feeble. The second was bold, sure-handed, thoroughgoing,, 
increasingly masterful, eminently sane. It was precisely in the darkest 
moment in Tchaikovsky's life that there surged up in his imagination 
the outlines of the Fourth Symphony — music far surpassing anything 
he had done in brilliance and exultant strength. 

On the other hand, Tchaikovsky's music which more than any 



* Some connection between the symphony and Tchaikovsky's rash marriage and subsequent 
collapse is inescapable, as an outline of dates will show. It was in May of 1877 that he 
became engaged to Antonina Ivanovna Miliukov. In that month, too,* he completed his 
sketches for the symphony. The wedding took place on July 18, and on July 26 Tchaikovsky 
fled to Kamenko ; there was a two weeks' farce of "conjugal" life at their house in Moscow 
(September 12 to 24), and the distraught composer attempted to catch a fatal cold by 
standing up to his waist in the frigid waters of the Moskva. Again the composer rfiade a 
precipitate flight, and never saw his wife again. Barely surviving a nerve crisis which 
"bordered upon insanity," he was taken by his brother, Anatol, to Switzerland for a com- 
plete rest and change. At Kamenko in August, in a condition which made peace of mind 
impossible, he was yet able to complete the orchestration of the first movement. At I>ake 
Geneva, as soon as he was able to take up his pen, the convalescent worked happily upon 
the remaining three movements. 

[14] 



other is drenched with lamentation, the "Pathetic" Symphony, he 
wrote during comparatively happy and healthful months, in the com- 
forting sense of having attained his fullest creative powers. Tchai- 
kovsky simply reveled in a poignant style of melody which somehow 
fully expressed his nature, and was not unconnected with a strain of 
Byronic melancholy, highly fashionable at the time. Tchaikovsky the 
dramatist could easily throw himself into a luxury of woe in his 
music — the more so when outwardly all was well with him. When, 
on the other hand, trouble reared its head, he found his salvation 
from a life that was unendurable by losing himself in musical dreams 
where he was no longer a weakling, but proud and imperious in his 
own domain. He wrote to Mme. von Meek, August 12, 1877, when, 
shortly after his marriage and on the verge of a breakdown, he was 
still at work upon the Fourth Symphony: "There are times in life 
when one must fortify oneself to endure and create for oneself some 
kind of joy, however shadowy. Here is a case in point: either live with 
people and know that you are condemned to every kind of misery, 
or escape somewhere and isolate yourself from every possibility of 
intercourse, which, for the most part, leads only to pain and grief." 
Tchaikovsky wrote this when the shadow of his marriage was still 
upon him, the longed-for escape not within his grasp. When he did 
make that escape, and found virtually complete isolation from his 
world in a villa at Clarens, where he could gaze across the fair ex- 
panse of Lake Geneva, then did he bring his symphony and his opera, 
'Eugene Oniegen" to their full flowering and conclusion. 

Part of this new and safe world was a companion who could still 
hold him in personal esteem, fortify his belief in himself as an artist, 
receive with eager interest his confidences on the progress of his scores — 
and do these things at a distance, where personal complications could 
not enter. Madame Nadejda Filaretovna von Meek could do still more. 
She made possible his retreat and solicitously provided for his every 
comfort by sending large and frequent cheques. This widow of means, 
who had befriended the composer early in the same year, was romanti- 
cally inclined, and, according to her letters until recently withheld, 
would have welcomed the meeting which Tchaikovsky was forced 
by her unmistakably affectionate attitude carefully to forbid. He natu- 
rally shrank from spoiling their successful and "safe" letter friend- 
ship by another possible entanglement such as he had just escaped. 
On the basis of a constant interchange of letters he was able to pour 
out confidences on the progress of his symphony — "our symphony," 
he called it — without restraint. He naturally identified his new score 
with his devoted friend, whose money and affectionate sympathy had 
made it possible. 

Tchaikovsky went to Italy in November, whence he wrote to his 

[15] 





Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bri 

you a wealth of their greatest performances I 
encore after encore! Among them: 

• Egmont Overture, Op. 84 — Beethoven. The Boston Symph( 
Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor. 12-0288, $1.2! 

• Symphony No. 4, in A, Op. 90 ("Italian")— Mendelsso 
The Boston Synnphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, C 
ductor. RCA Victor Album DM-1259, $4.75. 

THE WORLD'S 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs through 
the "Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor "Crestwood"! Hear 
your treasured recordings brilliantly reproduced I De luxe automatic record 
changer with "Silent Sapphire" permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, shortwave 
radio. AC Victrola 8V151. "VIctrola"— T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 




HAVE YO 



[16] 




Ihmt>.., 



WHITTEMORE & LOWE 



• Ritual Fire Dance (from "El Amor Brujo"), and Nana (from 
I "Seven Popular Spanish Songs") — Falla. Whittemore and 
lowe. RCA Victor Record 12-0582, $1.25. 

,• Concerto in D Minor— Poulenc. Whittemore and Lowe, with 
the RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra conducted by Dimitri 
^•tropoulos. RCA Victor Album DM-1235, $4.75. 

•ces are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclu- 
Jocal taxes. Prices of single records do not include Federal 



iST ARTISTS ARE 



Otf 



OTH.E NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



tS^h 



[•7] 



unseen friend in elation about the completion of the symphony. "I 
may be making a mistake, but it seems to me this Symphony is not a 
mediocre work, but the best I have done so far. How glad I am that 
it is ours, and that, hearing it, you will know how much 1 thought 
of you with every bar." Mme. von Meek was present at the first per- 
formance, given in Moscow by the Russian Musical Society, February 
22, 1878. The composer, in Florence, awaited the telegrams of con- 
gratulation from his friends. 

The Symphony caused no particular stir in Moscow — the critics 
passed it by, and Tchaikovsky's intimate friends, Nicholas Rubinstein, 
who conducted it, and Serge Taneiev, wrote him letters picking the 
work to pieces with devastating candor. But Tchaikovsky was now 
impregnable in his cheerful belief in his work. The keynote of his 
state of mind is in this exuberant outburst — one of many — to his 
friend, from San Remo: "I am in a rose-colored mood. Glad the opera 
is finished, glad spring is at hand, glad 1 am well and free, glad to 
feel safe from unpleasant meetings, but happiest of all to possess in 
your friendship, and in my brother's affection, such sure props in life, 
and to be conscious that I may eventually perfect my art." 

The question of the "programme" for this symphony is openly dis- 
cussed by its composer in letters at this time. To Taneiev, who had 
protested against the programme implications in the work, Tchai- 
kovsky answered (March 27, 1878), defending it: 

"With all that you say as to my Symphony having a programme, 1 
am quite in agreement. But I do not see why this should be a mistake. 
I am far more afraid of the contrary; I do not wish any symphonic 
work to emanate from me which has nothing to express, and consists 
merely of harmonies and a purposeless design of rhythms and modula- 
tions. Of course, my Symphony is programme music, but it would 
be impossible to give the programme in words; it would appear 
ludicrous and only raise a smile. Ought not this to be the case with 
a symphony, which is the most lyrical of all musical forms? Ought it 
not to express all those things for which words cannot be found, 
which nevertheless arise in the heart and clamor for expression? Be- 
sides, I must tell you that in my simplicity I imagined the plan of 
my Symphony to be so obvious that everyone would understand its 
meaning, or at least its leading ideas, without any definite programme. 
Pray do not imagine I want to swagger before you with profound 
emotions and lofty ideas. Throughout the work, I have made no 
effort to express any new thought. In reality my work is a reflection 
of Beethoven's Fifth Symphony; I have not copied his musical con- 
tents, only borrowed the central idea. What kind of a programme has 
this Fifth Symphony, do you think? Not only has it a programme, 
but it is so clear that there cannot be the smallest difference of opinion 
as to what it means. Much the same lies at the root of my Symphony, 
and if you have failed to grasp it, it simply proves that I am no Bee- 
thoven — on which point I have no doubt whatever. Let me add that 
there is not a single bar in this Fourth Symphony of mine which I 
have not truly felt, and which is not an echo of my most intimate 

spiritual life." 

[copyrighted] 

[18] 






win Jm pliar»4t 



iDtJSiSli* . . , , ^ . »^it# la f i^oFt %» 33 




Slgair 



Carnegie Hall 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FOURTH AFTERNOON CONCERT 
SATURDAY, March 19 



Program 

Brahms "Tragic" Overture, Op. 81 

Satie Two "Gymnopedies" 

(Orchestrated by Debussy) 

Debussy "La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques 

I. De I'aube k midi sur la mer 
II. Jeux de vagues 
III. Dialogue du vent et de la mer 

INTERMISSION 

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor. Op. 68 

I. Un poco sostenuto; Allegro 

II. Andante sostenuto 

III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso 

IV. Adagio; Allegro non troppo, ma con brio 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library. 



[19] 



TRAGIC OVERTURE, Op. 81 
By Johannes Brahms 
Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna April 3, 1897 



The Tragische Ouverture, like the Academische Fest Ouvertiire, was composed 
at Ischl in the summer 1880. It was first performed in Vienna by the Vienna 
Philharmonic under Hans Richter in the some year. The first performance in 
Boston was on October 29, i88i 

The overture is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two 
bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, timpani and strings. 

^^^NE weeps, the other laughs," Brahms said of his pair of over- 
V-/ tures, the "Tragic" and the "Academic Festival." Eric Blom 
adds, "Why not 'Jean (Johannes) qui pleure et Jean qui rit? * " Buit 
as the bright overture does not precisely laugh but rather exudes a 
sort of good-natured, sociable contentment, a Gemiitlichkeit, so the dark 
one is anything but tearful. Critics have imagined in it Hamlet, or 
Aristotle, or Faust, or some remote figure of classical tragedy, but none 
have divined personal tragedy in this score. Walter Niemann considers 
this overture less genuinely tragic than the music in which Brahms did 
not deliberately assume the tragic mask, as for example the first move- 
ment of the D minor piano concerto or certain well-known pages 
from the four symphonies. He does find in it the outward tragic 
aspect of "harshness and asperity" and puts it in the company of those 
" 'character* overtures which have a genuine right to be called tragic: 
Handel's 'Agrippina,' Beethoven's 'Coriolan,' Cherubini's 'Medea,' 
Schumann's 'Manfred,' Volkmann's 'Richard III' overtures. No throb- 
bing vein of more pleasing or tender emotions runs through ithe cold 
classic marble of Brahms' overture. Even the second theme, in F, re- 
mains austere and palely conventional, and its yearning is, as it were, 
frozen into a sort of rigidity. The minor predominates throughout, 
and the few major themes and episodes are for the most part, accord- 
ing to Brahms' wont, at once mingled harmonically with the minor; 
they are, moreover, purely rhythmical rather than melodic in quality; 
forcibly insisting upon power and strength rather than confidently and 
unreservedly conscious of them. The really (tragic quality, the fleeting 
touches of thrilling, individual emotion in this overture, are not to 
be found in conflict and storm, but in the crushing loneliness of 
terrifying and unearthly silences, in what have been called 'dead 
places.' Thus, at the very beginning of the development section, where 
the principal theme steals downward pianissimo, note by note, amid 
long-sustained, bleak harmonies on the wind instruments, and in its 
[20] 



final cadence on A, E, sighed out by the wind after the strings, we almost 
think we can see the phantom of the blood-stained Edward flitting 
spectrally through the mist on the moors of the Scottish highlands; 
or again, at the tempo primo at the close of the development section, 
where all is silence and emptiness after the funeral march derived 
from the principal subject has died away; or lastly, at the close of the 
whole work, where the curtain rapidly falls on the gloomy funeral 
cortege to the rhythm of the funeral march. 

[copyw^-hted] 



GYMNOP^DIES Nos. i and 3 (Orchestrated by Claude Debussy) 

By Erik Satie 
Born at Honfleur, France, May 17, 1866; died at Arcueil, near Paris, July 1, 1925 



Satie composed his three "Gymnopedies" in 1888. Debussy orchestrated the first 
and last of them (but reversed their order) . The first (Satie's third) , lente et grave, 
is scored for two flutes, oboe, four horns, and strings. The second (Satie's first) , 
lente et douloureuse, adds a cymbal (struck with a drum stick) and two harps. 

AT the age of twenty-two Erik Satie was an obscure musician with 
k. indolent ways, who had an alert ear for musical currents but had 
as yet allied himself with none. It was then that he wrote pieces for 
the pianoforte, dances "slow, grave, processional in tone, suavely and 
serenely classical in spirit," and named them "Gymnopedies^" after a 
ritual of ancient Sparta. 

Satie inherited from his Scotch mother the two un-Latin middle 
names, Alfred Leslie. Philip Hale wrote in his monograph on the 
French composer: "An old lady of Scotch descent named Hanton, 
living in London, had a daughter, who, a rather romantic person, 
happened to visit Honfleur. She met the elder Satie, loved him, and 
married him. She wished to show Scotland to her husband. The child, 
Erik, was 'formed under the influence of joy and audacity, of sea 
mists, and of penetrating bag-pipe melodies.' The boy, when he was 
eight years old, learned music from an organist of St. Catherine, a 
church on the Honfleur coast. At the age of eleven, he entered the 
Paris Conservatory and studied under Guiraud and Mathias. The 
latter, finding him indolent, advised him to study the violin, for it 
would be of more use to him. Erik attended a composition class as a 
listener. He was more interested in plain song, mediaeval religious 
polyphony known to him at Honfleur. He had already written much, 
when feeling his technique insufficient, he went, over forty years old, 
to the Schola Cantorum for the rigid discipline of fugue and counter- 
point under Albert Roussel. 

[21] 



"Satie was poor and unknown for many years, but he had one con- 
solation: he was a humoristic ironist. Perhaps he was sincere when he 
called himself a Symbolist. He fell in with that strange person, the 
Sar Peladan, and composed music for his 'Le Fils des Etoiles/ also 
'Sonneries de la Rose Crois.' The Sar praised him, classing him with 
Wagner and Grieg, as the only true composers. For the Sar's novel 
*La Panthee/ Satie wrote a 'theme.' There is the 'Prelude de la Porte 
heroique du Ciel.' 

"He gave singular titles to early compositions: 'Veritables preludes 
flasques (pour un chien) '; 'Trois Morceaux en forme de poire'; 'En 
habit de chevaV; 'The Dreamy Fish'; 'Airs to make one run'; 'Things 
seen right and left* (piano and violin) . He told pianists that they 
must play a piece 'on yellow velvet, dry as a cuckoo, light as an t^g'"; 
or 'in the most profound silence,' 'with hands in the pockets,' 'like 
a nightingale with the toothache.* He would write a programme: 
'This is the chase of the lobster; the hunters descend to the bottom of 
the water; they run. The sound of a horn is heard at the bottom of 
the sea. The lobster is tracked. The lobster weeps.' He wrote for other 
compositions: 'Those who will not understand are begged to keep the 
most respectful silence and to show an attitude of complete submission 
and complete inferiority.' Poseur, buffoon? It was admitted that at 
least he had originality. In his latter years, when he said it was neces- 
sary to be serious in life, he added, 'Debussy and Ravel have done me 
the honor to say that they found certain things in my music — perhaps 
— it hardly matters — if I have failed it is because I have been a 
dreamer, and dreamers are at a disadvantage — they are too rare.' 

"He knew his hour of glory when his 'Socrate,' a symbolical drama 
for voices and orchestra, text based on Plato's Dialogues (published 
in 1918) , was produced. For a time he associated with the 'Six,' but he 
formed another group composed of Henri Cliquet, Roger Desormiere,. 
Henri Sauguet and Maxine Jacob, and presented them in a concert on 
June 14, 1923. Mr. Olin Downes described him as 'an amusing old 
man, a dilettante of the future, who wore a blue, shiny suit, a gleam- 
ing eyeglass, and misleading whiskerage, and ate his food in a mincing 
and derisive manner.' Lonely at Arcueil, he read the novels of young 
Raymond Radiguet and the fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen. 

"Jean Cocteau admired him to the last. 'One of Satie's charms,' 
he wrote in 1918, 'is the little ground he offers for his deification. His 
titles authorize those who don't know their worth to laugh. Debussy 
is only a near-sighted ear, while Satie comes to us today young among 
the young, at last finding his place after twenty years of modest work.' 

[ COPYRIGHTED 1 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLIXS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[22] 




The Treasurer's Report 
that Nobody Wanted to Hear 

It was bad news. Production was up. Sales were up. But 
profits took a nose dive. One item did it ... a hidden 
bombshell ... an embezzlement of several thousand dollars 
by a "faith Jul" employee with the company for twenty years. 

This goes on all the time. Your company might be next. 
Let The Employers' Group Man with the Plan show you 
how easy and inexpensive it is to prevent such losses with 
our Dishonesty Protection Plan. 



THE EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

110 Milk St., Boston 7, Mass. 
The Employers' Group Man is The Man with the Plan 




[23] 



"THE SEA" (Three Orchestral Sketches) 
By Claude Debussy 

Bom at Saint-Germain (Scine-et-Oise) , France, August 22, 1862; 
died at Paris, March 25, 1918 



It was in the years 1903-05 that Debussy composed "La Mer." It was first per- 
formed at the Concerts Lamoureux in Paris, October 15, 1905. The first per- 
formance at the Boston Symphony concerts was on March 2, 1907, Dr. Karl Muck 
conductor (this was also the first performance in the United States) . 

*'La Mer" is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, 
three bassoons, double bassoon, four horns, three trumpets, two cornets-d-pistons, 
three trombones, tuba, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, glockenspiel (or celesta) , 
timpani, bass drum, two harps, and strings. 

Etebussy made a considerable revision of the score, which was published in 1909. 

There could be no denying Debussy's passion for the sea: he fre- 
quently visited the coast resorts, spoke and wrote with constant en- 
thusiasm about "my old friend the sea, always innumerable and beauti- 
ful." He often recalled his impressions of the Mediterranean at Cannes, 
where he spent boyhood days. It is worth noting, however, that 
Debussy did not seek the seashore while at work upon his ''La Mer.** 
His score was with him at Dieppe, in 1904, but most of it was written 
in Paris, a milieu which he chose, if the report of a chance remark 
is trustworthy, "because the sight of the sea itself fascinated him to 
such a degree that it paralyzed his creative faculties." When he went 
to the country in the summer of 1903, two years before the completion 
of "La Mer I* it was not the shore, but the hills of Burgundy, whence 
he wrote to his friend Andre Messager (September 12) : "You may 
not know that I was destined for a sailor's life and that it was only 
quite by chance that fate led me in another direction. But I have al- 
ways retained a passionate love for her [the sea]. You will say that 
the Ocean does not exactly wash the Burgundian hillsides — and my 
seascapes might be studio landscapes; but I have an endless store of 
memories, and to my mind they are worth more than the reality, 
whose beauty often deadens thought." 

Debussy's deliberate remoteness from reality, consistent with his 
cultivation of a set and conscious style, may have drawn him from 
salty actuality to the curling lines, the rich detail and balanced 
symmetry of Hokusai's "The Wave." In any case, he had the famous 
print reproduced upon the cover of his score. His love for Japanese 
art tempted him to purchases which in his modest student days were 
a strain upon his purse. His piano piece, "Foissons d'or," of 1907, was 
named from a piece of lacquer in his possession. 

What other writers deplored in Debussy's new score when it was 
new, M. D. Calvocoressi, who was then among the Parisian critics, 

[ 24 ] 



welcomed as "a new phase in M. Debussy's evolution; the inspiration 
is more robust, the colors are stronger, the lines more definite." Louis 
Laloy, who was always Debussy's prime rhapsodist, wrote in the same 
vein. Until that time his music had been "an art made up of sugges- 
tions, nuances, allusions, an evocative art which awoke in the hearer's 
soul echoes of thoughts that were not merely vague, but intentionally 
incomplete; an art capable of creating delightful impressionistic pic- 
tures out of atmospheric vibrations and effects of light, almost without 
any visible lines or substance. Without in any way abandoning this 
delicate sensitiveness, which is perhaps unequalled in the world of art, 
his style has today become concise, decided, positive, complete; in a 
word, classical." 

It would be hard to think of a score more elusive than "La Mer" 

to minute analysis. The cyclic unity of the suite is cemented by the 
recurrence in the last movement of the theme in the first, heard after 
the introductory measures from the muted trumpet and English horn. 
A theme for brass, also in the opening sketch, becomes an integral 
part of the final peroration. Music to set the imagination aflame, it 
induced from the pen of Lawrence Gilman one of his most evocative 
word pictures: 

"Debussy had what Sir Thomas Browne would have called *a solitary 
and retired imagination.' So, when he essays to depict in his music 
such things as dawn and noon at sea, sport of the waves, gales and 
surges and far horizons, he is less the poet and painter than the 
spiritual mystic. It is not chiefly of those aspects of winds and waters 
that he is telling us, but of the changing phases of a sea of dreams, 
a chimerical sea, a thing of strange visions and stranger voices, of 
fantastic colors and incalculable winds — a phantasmagoria of the 
spirit, rife with evanescent shapes and presences that are at times 
sunlit and dazzling. It is a spectacle perceived as in a trance, vaguely 
yet rhapsodically. There is a sea which has its shifting and lucent sur- 
faces, which even shimmers and traditionally mocks. But it is a sea 
that is shut away from too curious an inspection, to whose murmurs 
or imperious command not many have wished or needed to pay heed. 

"Yet, beneath these elusive and mysterious overtones, the reality of 
the living sea persists: the immemorial fascination lures and enthralls 
and terrifies; so that we are almost tempted to fancy that the .wo are, 
after all, identical — the ocean that seems an actuality of wet winds 
and tossing spray and inexorable depths and reaches, and that un- 
charted and haunted and incredible sea which opens before the magic 
casements of the dreaming mind." 

I COPYRIGHTED] 



[25] 



SYMPHONY IN C MINOR, NO. i. Op. 68 

By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, 1897 



The First Symphony of Brahms had its initial performance November 4, 1876, 
at Carlsruhe, Otto Dessoff conducting. 

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings. 
The trombones are used only in the finale. 

THE known fact that Brahms made his first sketches for the sym- 
phony under the powerful impression of Beethoven's Ninth, which 
he had heard in Cologne for the first time in 1854, may have led his 
contemporaries to preconceive comparisons between the two. Walter 
Niemann, not without justice, finds a kinship between the First Sym- 
phony and Beethoven's Fifth through their common tonality of C 
minor, which, says Niemann, meant to Brahms "hard, pitiless struggle, 
daemonic, supernatural shapes, sinister defiance, steely energy, drama- 
tic intensity of passion, darkly fantastic, grisly humor." He calls it 
"Brahms' Pathetic Symphony." 

The dark and sinister side of the C minor Symphony seems to have 
taken an unwarranted hold on the general consciousness when it was 
new. For a long while controversy about its essential character waxed 
hot after every performance. W. F. Apthorp bespoke one faction when 
he wrote in 1878 of the First Symphony that it "sounds for the most 
part morbid, strained and unnatural; most of it even ugly." Philip 
Hale, following this school of opinion, some years later indulged in a 
symbolic word picture, likening the symphony to a "dark forest" where 
"it seems that obscene, winged things listen and mock the lost." But 
Philip Hale perforce greatly modified his dislike of the music of 
Brahms as with the passage of years its oppressive aspects were somehow 
found no longer to exist. 

Instead of these not always helpful fantasies of earlier writers or a 
technical analysis of so familiar a subject, let us turn to the characteris- 
tic description by Lawrence Oilman, the musician who, when he 

touched upon the finer things in his art, could always be counted upon 
to impart his enthusiasm with apt imagery and quotation: 

The momentous opening of the Symphony (the beginning of an 
introduction of thirty-seven measures, Un poco sostenuto, 6-8) is one 
of the great exordiums of music — a majestic upward sweep of the 
strings against a phrase in contrary motion for the wind, with the 
basses and timpani reiterating a somberly persistent C. The following 
Allegro is among the most powerful of Brahms' symphonic move- 
ments. 

[26] 



In the deeply probing slow movement we get the Brahms who is 
perhaps most to be treasured: the musical poet of long vistas and 

grave meditations. How richly individual in feeling and expression 
is the whole of this Andante sostenutol No one but Brahms could 
have extracted the precise quality of emotion which issues from the 
simple and heartfelt theme for the strings, horns, and bassoon in the 
opening pages; and the lovely complement for the oboe is inimitable 
— a melodic invention of such enamouring beauty that it has lured 
an unchallengeably sober commentator into conferring upon it the 
attribute of "sublimity." Though perhaps "sublimity" — a shy bird, 
even on Olympus — is to be found not here, but elsewhere in this 
symphony. 

The third movement (the Poco allegretto e grazioso which takes the 
place of the customary Scherzo) is beguiling in its own special loveli- 
ness; but the chief glory of the symphony is the Finale. 

Here — if need be — is an appropriate resting-place for that diffi- 
dent eagle among epithets, sublimity. Here there are space and air 
and light to tempt its wings. The wonderful C major song of the 
horn in the slow introduction of this movement {Piii Andante, 4-4), 
heard through a vaporous tremolo of the muted strings above softly 
held trombone chords, persuaded William Foster Ap thorp that the 
episode was suggested to Brahms by "the tones of the Alpine horn, 



DOUBLE BASS RECORDS 

The Anniversary Album of Double 
Bass records by Serge Koussevitzky (pri- 
vate souvenir pressing) is now on sale at 
the Box Office. The proceeds (at $10 
each) will benefit the Koussevitzky 25th 
Anniversary Fund. 

Address mail orders to Symphony Hall, Boston 15, 
Mass. ($10 includes shipping charge). 



[27] 



as it awakens the echoes from mountain after mountain on some of 
the high passes in the Bernese Oberland." This passage is interrupted 
by a foreshadowing of the majestic chorale-like phrase for the trom- 
bones and bassoons which later, when it returns at the climax of the 
movement, takes the breath with its startling grandeur. And then 
comes the chief theme of the Allegro — that spacious and heartening 
melody which sweeps us onward to the culminating moment in the 
Finale: the apocalyptic vision of the chorale in the coda, which may 
recall to some the exalted prophecy of Jean Paul: "There will come 
a time when it shall be light; and when man shall awaken from 
his lofty dreams, and find his dreams still there, and that nothing has 
gone save his sleep." 

Not until he was forty-three did Brahms present his First Sym- 
phony to the world. His friends had long looked to him expectantly to 
carry on this particular glorious German tradition. As early as 1854 
Schumann, who had staked his strongest prophecies on Brahms' future, 
wrote to Joachim: "But where is Johannes? Is he flying high, or only 
under the flowers? Is he not yet ready to let drums and trumpets 
sound? He should always keep in mind the beginning of the Beethoven 
symphonies: he should try to make something like them. The begin- 
ning is the main thing; if only one makes a beginning, then the end 
comes of itself." Schumann, that shrewd observer, knew that the brief 
beginnings of Brahms were apt to germinate, to expand, to lead him 
to great ends. Also, that Beethoven, symphonically speaking, would 
be his point of departure. 

To write a symphony after Beethoven was "no laughing matter," 
Brahms once wrote, and after sketching a first movement he admitted 
to Hermann Levi — "I shall never compose a symphony I You have no 
conception of how the likes of us feel when we hear the tramp of a 
giant like him behind us." 

To study Brahms is to know that this hesitancy was not prompted 
by any craven fear of the hostile pens which were surely lying in wait 
for such an event as a symphony from the newly vaunted apostle of 
classicism. Brahms approached the symphony (and the concerto too) 
slowly and soberly; no composer was ever more scrupulous in the com- 
mitment of his musical thoughts to paper. He proceeded with elaborate 
examination of his technical equipment — with spiritual self-question- 
ing — and with unbounded ambition. The result — a period of fourteen 
years between the first sketch and the completed manuscript; and a i 
score which, in proud and imposing independence, in advance upon all 
precedent — has absolutely no rival among the first-born symphonies, 
before or since. 

[28] 



Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Fifth and Last Pair of Concerts 

JVednesday Eveningj April IJ 
Saturday Afternoon^ April l6 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

'*A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowi- 
edge" 

Lawrence Gilman in the 
N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.00 per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



• THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 

CONCERT BULLETIN 

• THE BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 

PROGRAM 

• THE BOSTON POPS PROGRAM 

The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra 

PUBLICATIONS 

Coverage: Higher Income Groups 
Positions: All Conspicuous 
Rates: Moderate 



Total Circulation More Than 500.000 



For Information and Rates Call 

Mrs. Dana Somes. Advertising Manager 

Tel. CO 6-1492, or write: 

Symphony Hall. Boston 15. Mass. 



[29] 



His first attempt at a symphony, made at the age of twenty, was 
diverted in its aim, the first two movements eventually becoming the 
basis of his piano concerto No. i, in D minor. He sketched another 
first movement at about the same time (1854), but it lay in his desk for 
years before he felt ready to take the momentous plunge. "For about 
fourteen years before the work appeared," writes D. Millar Craig,* 
"it was an open secret among Brahms' best friends that his first sym- 
phony was practically complete. Professor Lipsius of Leipzig Univer- 
sity, who knew Brahms well and had often entertained him, told me 
that from 1862 onwards, Brahms almost literally carried the manu- 
script score about with him in his pocket, hesitating to have it made 
public. Joachim and Frau Schumann, among others, knew that the 
symphony was finished, or at all events practically finished, and urged 
Brahms over and over again to let it be heard. But not until 1876 could 
his diffidence about it be overcome." 

It would be interesting to follow the progress of the sketches. We 
know from Madame Schumann that she found the opening, as origi- 
nally submitted to her, a little bold and harsh, and that Brahms ac- 
cordingly put in some softening touches. "It was at Munster am Stein," 
(1862) says Albert Dietrich, "that Brahms showed me the first move- 
ment of his symphony in C minor, which, however, only appeared 
much later, and with considerable alterations." 

At length (November 4, 1876), Brahms yielded his manuscript to 
Otto Dessoff for performance at Carlsruhe. He himself conducted it at 
Mannheim, a few days later, and shortly afterward at Vienna, Leipzig, 
and Breslau. Brahms may have chosen Carlsruhe in order that so cru- 
cial an event as the first performance of his first symphony might have 
the favorable setting of a small community, well sprinkled with friends, 
and long nurtured in the Brahms cause. "A little town," he called it, 
"that holds a good friend, a good conductor, and a good orchestra." 
Brahms' private opinion of Dessoff, as we now know, was none too high. 
But Dessoff was valuable as a propagandist. He had sworn allegiance 
to the Brahms colors by resigning from his post as conductor of the 
Vienna Philharmonic because Brahms' Serenade in A major was re- 
fused. A few years before Dessoff at Carlsruhe, there had been Hermann 
Levi, who had dutifully implanted Brahms in the public consciousness. 

Carlsruhe very likely felt honored by the distinction conferred upon 
them — and in equal degree puzzled by the symphony itself. There was 
no abundance of enthusiasm at these early performances, although 
Carlsruhe, Mannheim and Breslau were markedly friendly. The sym- 
phony seemed formidable at the first hearing, and incomprehensible 
— even to those favored friends who had been allowed an advance ac- 
quaintance with the manuscript score, or a private reading as piano 



• British Broadcasting Corporation Orchestra programme notes. 
[30] 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 



At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evening J^^Y 16 

Sunday afternoon ]vi\y 17 

Saturday evening ]u\y 23 

Sunday afternoon July 24 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening ]vi\y 28 

Saturday evening July 30^ 

Sunday afternoon July 31 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening . August 1 1 

Saturday evening August 13' 

Sunday afternoon August 14' 



Extra concerts 
(Bach-Mozart- 
Haydn- 
Schubert) 



SERIES A 



SERIES B 



SERIES C 



For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, apply at the sub- 
scription office in Symphony Hall. 



[31] 



duet, such as Brahms and Ignatz Briill gave at the home of Friedrich 
Ehrbar in Vienna. Even Florence May wrote of the "clashing disso- 
nances of the first introduction." Respect and admiration the symphony 
won everywhere. It was apprehended in advance that when the com- 
poser of the Deutsches Requtkm at last fulfilled the prophecies of Schu- 
mann and gave forth a symphony, it would be a score to be reckoned 
with. No doubt the true grandeur of the music, now so patent to every- 
one as by no means formidable, would have been generally grasped far 
sooner, had not the Brahmsians and the neo-Germans immediately 
raised a cloud of dust and kept their futile controversy raging for years. 
The First Symphony soon made the rounds of Germany, enjoying 
a particular success in Berlin, under Joachim (November ii, 1877) . In 
March of the succeeding year it was also heard in Switzerland and Hol- 
land. The manuscript was carried to England by Joachim for a per- 
formance in Cambridge, and another in London in April, each much 
applauded. The first performance dn Boston took place January 3, 
1878, under Carl Zerrahn and the Harvard Musical Association. When 
the critics called it "morbid," "strained," "unnatural," "coldly elabo- 
rated," "depressing and unedifying," Zerrahn, who like others of his 
time knew the spirit of battle, at once announced a second perform- 
ance for January 31. Sir George Henschel, an intrepid friend of 
Brahms, performed the C minor Symphony, with other works of the 
composer, in this orchestra's first year. 

Still more ink has been expended on a similarity admitted even by 
Florence May between the expansive and joyous C major melody sung 
by the strings in the Finale, and the theme of the Hymn to Joy in 
Beethoven's Ninth. The enemy of course raised the cry of "plagiarism." 
But a close comparison of the two themes shows them quite different 
in contour. Each has a diatonic, Volkslied character, and each is in- 
troduced with a sudden radiant emergence. The true resemblance 
between the two composers might rather lie in this, that here, as pat- 
ently as anywhere. Brahms has caught Beethoven's faculty of soaring 
to great heights upon a theme so naively simple that, shorn of its 
associations, it would be about as significant as a subject for a musical 
primer. Beethoven often, and Brahms at his occasional best, could lift 
such a theme, by some strange power which entirely eludes analysis, 
to a degree of nobility and melodic beauty which gives it the unmis- 
takable aspect of immortality. 

t COPYRIGHTED] 



[32] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^'^^'^\l2^^f^7"^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

BeethoYen Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis ; - 

Overture to "Egmont" 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3, 4 

Violin Concerto ( Heif etz ) , Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico." "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" ( Speaker : Melvyn Douglas ) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faur6 "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto ; Air from "Semele" (Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Kha tchatourian Piano Concerto ( Soloist : William Kapell i 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201 ) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

ProkofleflF Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heif etz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf"; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chlo6," Suite No. 2 ( new recording ) : 

Pavane. Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" : Dubinushka 

Satie GymnopMie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring" ) 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5; "Pohjola's Daughter"; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fldelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring." "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (SanroraA): Song of the Volga Bargemen 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4. 5. 6: Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture. "Romeo and .Juliet": Fan- 
tasia. "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 




laliitiJin 



The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — 'Mt is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIN PIASO COMPANY 

160 Boylston St., Boston . Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin also builds ACROSON/C,HAV,fLTON HOWARD pianos and fhe BALDWIN El£CTRONIC ORGAN 



?i 



Lj 



4 



5} 



BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



\ 



fe 



r 



A' 



■'liilll 



^ — 



H 



V\\:J 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
1948 -1949 

Carnegie Hall, New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 
Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofeky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir ResnikoS 
Joseph Leibovid 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 

Norman Carol 
Carlos Pinfield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 
Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap^ 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 

Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 

Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakii 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 

Principals 
Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 

Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stembuig 
Charles Smith 



Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



,^^^^^ 



i9"24\KJ949 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fifth Concert 

WEDNESDAY EVENING, April 13 

AND THE 

Fifth Matinee 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, April 16 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The TRUSTEES of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallo well Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 

[1] 



BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL, 1949 

TANGLEWOOD, LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

PROGRAMS 

SERIES A Vivaldi Orchestral Concerto in D minor 

Thursday Eve- Strauss "Death and Transfi^ration" 

NiNG, July 28 ^ ;; ; 

•" Br.\hms Symphony No. 2, in D major 

Beethoven Overture to "Egmont" 

Beethoven .Piano Concerto No. 4, in G major 

Saturday Eve- {Soloist: Claudio Arrau) 

NING, July 30 Liszt A Faust Symphony 

(In commemoration of the 200th Anniversary 
of the bir th of Goethe) 

Leonard Bernstein, conducting 

Sunday After- Schumann Overture to "Manfred" 

noon, July f}i Schumann Symphony No. 4, in D minor 

Str.\vinsky "Le Sacre du Printemps" 

SERIES B Tchaikovsky Serenade for String Orchestra 

^ ^ , Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto 

Thursday Eve- .^^. ^^^^^ ^ 

ning, August 4 ^ ^ ' 

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4, in F minor 

RoussEL Suite in F major 

Milhaud Violoncello Concerto No. 2 

^Saturday Eve- (Soloist: Gregor Piatigorsky) 
ning August 6 Messiaen "L'Ascension" 

Franck Symphony in D minor 

Eleazar de Carvalho, conducting 

Sunday After- William Schuman Symphony for Strings 

noon, August 7 ViLLA-LoBos Mandii-Cirdra 

Strauss "Thus Spake Zarathustra" 

SERIES C Leonard Bernstein, conducting 

Thursday Eve- Schubert Symphony No. 4 ("Tragic") 

ning, August 11 Shostakovitch Symphony No. 7 

Haydn Symphony in G major, .No. 88 

Saturday Eve- , , , ^, 

ning, August 13 Britten Symphony with Chorus 

(First performance) 

C. P. E. Bach Concerto for Orchestra 

. Copland .."Quiet City" 

Sunday After- ^^^^^^^ ^.^^ ^^^„ 

NOON, August 14 

Beethoven Symphony No. 5, in C minor 

Extra Concerts — Bach-Mozart Programs July 16, 17, 23, 24. 
For further information apply at subscription office, Symphony 
Hall. 

[2] 



Carnegie Hall, New York 
Sixty-third Season in New York 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY. Music Director 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, April 13, a^ 8:45 o'clock 

SATURDAY AFTERNOON, April 16, at 2:30 o'clock 



Program 



Beethoven Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21 

I. Adagio molto 

II. Andante cantabile con moto 

III. Menuetto: Allegro molto e vivace 

IV. Finale: Adagio; Allegro molto e vivace 

INTERMISSION 

Beethoven Symphony No. 9 in D minor, with final 

chorus on Schiller's Ode to Joy, Op. 125 

I. Allegro, ma non troppo, un poco maestoso 
II. Molto vivace: Presto 

III. Adagio molto e cantabile 

IV. Presto; Allegro 
Allegro assai 
Presto 

Baritone Recitative 

Quartet and Chorus: Allegro assai 

Tenor Solo and Chorus: Allegro assai vivace, alia marcia 

Chorus: Andante maestoso 

Adagio, ma non troppo, ma divoto 

Allegro energico, sempre ben marcato 

Quartet and Chorus: Allegro ma non tanto 

Chorus: Prestissimo 

Joint Choir of the 
JUILLIARD CHORUS AND THE COLLEGIATE CHORALE 

Prepared by Robert Shaw 

Soloists 
Frances Yeend, Soprano David Lloyd, Tenor 

Eunice Alberts, Contralto James Pease, Bass 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The music of these programs is available at the Music Library, 
58th Street Branch, the New York Public Library. 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Network (Station WNBC) Monday, 11:30-12:00 P.M. 

[3] 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fldelltone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master , 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 

I bKlflU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY BASS 
RECORDS 

Among the many reviews of the new 
album of double bass recordings by 
Serge Koussevitzky, the following are 
quoted: 

Claudia Cassidy (in the Chicago 
Tribune) : 

"Collectors in search of Serge Kous- 
sevitzky's double bass recordings are 
being rescued by a series of circum- 
stances. Perhaps you remember that 
when Boston asked its renowned con- 
ductor what he wanted in token of ad- 
miration and a£Eection in the 25th and 
farewell season, he said he wanted "a 
big gift" for his orchestra. That gift 
was a backlog of financial security, and 
the fast growing Serge Koussevitzky 
Anniversary fund is the result. To 
augment it, a limited edition of 1,000 
albums of Koussevitzky recordings has 
been made available by the Boston or- 
chestra in cooperation with RCA Victor. 
Each is autographed, holds the portrait 
of the player with his instrument now 
hanging in Koussevitzky's Tanglewood 
home, and features three 12-inch, ruby 
vinylite records of the slow movement 
from Koussevitzky's double bass con- 
certo, his Chanson Triste and Valse 
Miniature, and his arrangement of a 
largo by Eccles, plus a lullaby by Laska. 
The recordings were made in 1929, and 
you have to hear what they can do with 
the double bass to believe it. Pierre 
Luboshutz is the accompanist. The price 
is $10, including mailing costs. Address 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Sym- 
phony Hall, Boston 15." 

Jay C. Rosenfeld (in the Berkshire 
Eagle) : 

"Immediately discernible are the at- 
tributes which make orchestral music 
under his direction so absorbing; a 
magnificent conception of line, a con- 
tinuously glowing tone and the peerless 
faculty of maintaining and re-instilling 
vigorous urgency in the music. Except 
for a propensity to make his shifts and 
slides very noticeable, the mechanics 
of the playing are formidable. His in- 
tonation has the character associated 
with Casals and Heifetz, the tone has 
a vivid warmth and the bowing the un- 
canny amplitude of those masters who 
know the secret of preserving intensity 
without expending all their resources. 



[4] 



SYMPHONY NO. i in C MAJOR, Op. 21 

By LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 
Born at Bonn, December 16 (?), 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827 



The original manuscript of this symphony has not been found, and there is no 
certainty as to when it was composed, but sketches for the Finale were found among 
the exercises in counterpoint which the young composer made for Albrechtsberger as 
early as 1795. It was on April 2, 1800, in Vienna, that this symphony had its first 
performance. It was published in parts at the end of 1801. The full score did not 
appear in print until 1820. 

The orchestration includes two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two 
horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. It is dedicated to Baron van Swieten. 

BEETHOVEN^ giving his first public concert in Vienna "for his own 
benefit," after making due obeisance to the past with a sym- 
phony of Mozart and airs from Haydn's "Creation," submitted his 
popular septet, and one of his piano concertos, playing, of course, 
the solo part; he also improvised upon the pianoforte. Finally he pre- 
sented to the audience his newly completed Symphony in C major. The 
concert was received with marked interest, and a certain amount of 
critical approval. Indeed the young man was not without a reputation 
in Vienna as a pianist with almost uncanny powers of improvisation, 
who had written a number of sonatas, trios, quartets, and sets of varia- 
tions. In the orchestral field he had not yet committed himself, save in 
two early cantatas (never published) and in the two piano concertos 
(in B-flat and in C) which he had written a few years before for his 
own use. 

The introductory Adagio molto, only twelve bars in length, seems 
to take its cue from Haydn, and hardly foreshadows the extended in- 
troductions of the Second, Fourth and Seventh symphonies to come. 
There once was learned dissension over the very first bars, because 
the composer chose to open in the not so alien key of F, and to lead 
his hearers into G major. The composer makes amends with a main 
theme which proclaims its tonality by hammering insistently upon its 
tonic. With this polarizing theme he can leap suddenly from one 
key to another without ambiguity. The second theme, of orthodox con- 
trasting, and "feminine" character, seems as plainly designed to bring 
into play the alternate blending voices of the wood winds. 

The theme itself of the Andante cantabile was one of those inspira- 
tions which at once took the popular fancy. The way in which the 
composer begins to develop it in contrapuntal imitation recalls his 
not too distant studies with Albrechtsberger. The ready invention, the 
development of a fragment of rhythm or melody into fresh and charm- 
ing significance, the individual treatment of the various instruments 

[5] 



confirms what was already evident in the development of the first 
movement — Beethoven's orchestral voice already assmed and dis- 
tinct, speaking through the formal periods which he had not yet 
cast off. 

The "Minuet," so named, is more than the prophecy of a scherzo 
with its swifter tempo — allegro molto e vivace. Although the re- 
peats, the trio and da capo are quite in the accepted mold of the 
Haydnesque minuet, the composer rides freely on divine whims 
of modulation and stress of some passing thought, in a way which 
disturbed the pedants of the year 1800. Berlioz found the scherzo 
"of exquisite freshness, lightness, and grace — the one true original 
thing in this symphony." 

It is told of the capricious introductory five bars of the Finale, in 
which the first violins reveal the ascending scale of the theme bit by 
bit, that Tiirk, cautious conductor at Halle in 1809, made a practice 
of omitting these bars in fear that the audience would be moved 
to laughter. The key progiessions, the swift scale passages, the 
typical eighteenth-century sleight of hand, allies this movement more 
than the others with current ways. It was the ultimate word, let us 
say, upon a form which had reached with Haydn and Mozart its per- 
fect crystallization, and after which there was no alternative but a 
new path. 

[copyrighted] 



SYMPHONY NO. 9 IN D MINOR, with Final Chorus 

ON Schiller's "Ode to Joy/' Op. 125 

By LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 

Bom at Bonn, December 16 (?), 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827 



Completed in 1824, Beethoven's Ninth Symphony was first performed at the 
Kdrnthnerthortheater in Vienna on May 7 of that year and repeated on May 23. 
The first performance in this country was given by the New York Philharmonic 
Society, May 20, 1846. The Germania Musical Society in Boston, assisted by a 
chorus from the Handel and Haydn Society, gave a performance here Februar)- 5. 
1853. The Symphony was given annually by Georg Henschel to conclude each of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra's first three seasons. 

The Symphony is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, 
two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, 
timpani, bass drum, triangle, cymbals and strings. The score is dedicated to 
Wilhelm III of Prussia. 

THE fact that twelve years (1812-24) elapsed between Beethoven's 
Eighth Symphony and the completion of his Ninth does not 
signify that on entering the last phase of his creative life he de- 

[6] 




Three Words 

that Saved a New School from "Flunking Out" 

To the citizens of a small New England town, things looked bad for 
awhile. Their new school . . . only half completed . . . was in trouble. 
The contractor building the school ran into financial difficulties. His 
assets were attached. He couldn't finish the job. 

But three words . . . Bonded by Employers' . . . saved that school. For- 
tunately, the job was bonded by an Employers' Group Insurance Com- 
pany. And under the terms of our Contract Bond we furnished the money 
to complete the construction and give the town its new school. 

The Insurance Man Serves America 




BONDING SERVICE BY 

The Employers' Group 

Insurance Companies 

no MILK STREET, BOSTON 7, MASS. 

THE EMPLOYERS' LIABILITY ASSURANCE CORP.. LTD. 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS' INSURANCE CO. • THE EMPLOYERS' FIRE INSURANCE CO. 



[7] 



liberately turned away from the form in which he had dwelt so long 
and so magnificently. Did practical considerations deter him, considera- 
tions which included the need of money, or did his growing artist's 
nature require a pause for a new gathering of forces, a considered ap- 
proach to the problem of writing a symphony which should expand 
and alter the old orthodox formula with all of the adventurous free- 
dom he was then applying to the piano sonatas — transforming the 
moods and contours of his favorite form into something leagues re- 
moved from the Seventh and Eighth Symphonies and their prede- 
cessors? There is a good case for each point of view; let him decide 
who can. 

The historian's meticulous -chronicle of these years shows a Bee- 
thoven preoccupied with material cares which were no less real to him 
because they were largely self-imposed, or imaginary. They appear 
sordid indeed when compared to the ideal world of tones which at times 
they held in abeyance. There were the petty commissions, the occasional 
pieces such as the ''Wellington's Sieg," and the consequent law-suit 
with Maelzel ("Such things," he wrote to his lawyer, "exhaust me 
more than the greatest efforts in composition"); the attempts at or- 
ganizing concerts, the negotiations with patrons and publishers on a 
plane something short of accepted business ethics; all of which may be 
summed up as an attempt to "feather his nest" and lay aside a money 
portion for his nephew. The five years' struggle for the guardianship 
of Karl began with the death of his father (Beethoven's brother 
Caspar) in 1815. No uncle was ever more grotesquely unfitted for 
such a charge. Increasingly solitary, lamentably deaf, morbidly sus- 
picious and irascible, Beethoven goaded his nephew to extremes by 
his rigid exactions, while he raged at his servants, quarrelled with his 
friends. 

One cannot assume, despite all of this corroborative evidence, that 
Beethoven was deflected by external circumstances from continuing 
the symphonic succession. The musical inquirers are inclined to seek 
a deeper and more inward direction of the creative currents, just as 
they cannot accept as sufficient Wagner's assertion on laying the "Ring" 
aside to write "Tristan," that considerations of early production and 
profit were guiding him. Beethoven, too, dwelt lengthily on financial 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes^ Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 

Refresher courses in music education and theoretical subjects; courses in 

counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 

individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-September 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 
[8] 



advantages, but just as Wagner, with every intention of writing a 
performable and profitable piece, turned out a "Tristan" that was be- 
yond any theatre in Europe, Beethoven could not order his Missa 
Solemnis to an occasion, nor compose a symphony at the urgent bid- 
ding of the long expectant London Philharmonic Society. 

Beethoven's sketchbooks, as close a record of a great artist's shaping 
processes as posterity may hope to possess, show the long germination 
of the Ninth Symphony in Beethoven's mind. He had even from the 
Bonn days made musical notations of a possible setting for Schiller's 
"Ode to Joy," but these musical phrases have nothing in common 
with the theme he finally evolved, except in their diatonic simplicity. 
Apparently it did not occur to him until the symphony had reached 
an advanced stage to introduce Schiller's lines in this particular work. 
Although he had long pondered the unprecedented idea of introduc- 
ing human voices in a symphony, he planned for this one an instru- 
mental finale, the subject matter of which he ultimately used for the 
Finale of his String Quartet in A minor. 

Thoughts of a "symphony in D minor" were noted by Beethoven 
while he was making sketches for his Seventh and Eighth in 1812. In 
1815 there occurs an intended subject for a fugue which was destined 
to become the theme of the Scherzo. It was in 1817 that he began 
consciously to work upon a symphony, making drafts for the first 
movement, which in the next year took extended form. In 1818 his 
imagination was stimulated; the spell of the Missa Solemnis^ newly 
begun, induced thoughts of a religious, modal symphony, even a 
choral symphony. A Greek text was an alternate idea. He realized that 
German verses would not be appropriate for London, and he thought 
of two symphonies, one to be instrumental. The bold, disparate 
thoughts became diffused as they were pushed into the background 
by the all-absorbing Alissa Solemnis. 

When at last he was released from lingering anxieties over details 
of the Mass, the Symphony progressed no doubt the more rapidly for 
its long delay. With the first movement nearly completed in sketch form, 
Beethoven developed the other three simultaneously, according to his 
way. The first theme of the Adagio did not occur to him until the 
summer of 1823. Like the choral theme, it reached its perfection of 

WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the aijt of sinjfing: by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 

[9] 



simplicity, not by sudden inspiration, but by laborious and minute 
stages. Beethoven was faced with a real problem of integration when 
he came to the point of introducing plausibly a vocal text, after three 
prolonged instrumental movements, into the wordless realm wherein 
the symphony had always dwelt. "When he reached the development 
of the fourth movement," wrote Schindler, "there began a struggle 
such as is seldom seen. The object was to find a proper manner of 
introducing Schiller's ode. One day entering the room he exclaimed, 
'I have it! I have iti' With that he showed me the sketchbook bearing 
the words 'Let us sing the song of the immortal Schiller, Freude.' " 
These words, as the sketchbooks show, were arrived at only after 
many trials, and were changed in their turn. The symphony was com- 
pletely sketched by the end of 1823; written out in full score by 
February, 1824. Thayer, summing up its progress, points out that 
work upon the symphony as such extended, with interruptions, over 
six years and a half. "Serious and continuous labor" upon it, follow- 
ing the completion of the Mass, took a little more than a year. 



Themes which are gradually unfolded from mysterious munnurings in the 
orchestra — no uncommon experience nowadays — all date back to the opening meas- 
ures of the Ninth Symphony, where Beethoven conceived the idea of building a 
music of indeterminate open fifths on the dominant, accumulating a great 
crescendo of suspense until the theme itself is revealed in the pregnant key of D 
minor, proclaimed fortissimo by the whole orchestra in unison. It might be added 
that no one since has quite equaled the mighty effect of Beethoven's own precedent 
— not even Wagner, who held this particular page in mystic awe, and no doubt 
remembered it when he depicted the elementary serenity of the Rhine in a very 
similar manner at the opening of the "Ring." 

The development in this, the longest of Beethoven's first movements, progresses 
with unflagging power and majesty through many an episode, many a sudden illumi- 
nation from some fragment of his themes. At the restatement of the main theme the 
orchestra is flooded with the triumph of the D major long withheld. The long 
coda, coming at the point where it would seem that nothing more could be said 
on a much developed subject, calls forth new vistas from the inexhaustible im- 
agination of the tone magician who needed little more than the common chord 
upon which to erect his vast schemes. Tovey writes of this movement (in "Essays 
of Musical Analysis") that it "dwarfs every other first movement, long or short, that 
has been written before or since," attaining its stature, in his opinion, by a perfect 
balance in the organization of its parts. And Grove goes further still ("Beethoven 
and his Nine Symphonies"): "Great as are the beauties of the second and third 
movements — and it is impossible to exaggerate them — and original, vigorous and 
impressive as are many portions of the finale, it is still the opening allegro that one 
thinks of when the Ninth Symphony is mentioned. In many respects it differs from 
other first movements of Beethoven; everything seems to combine to make it the 
greatest of tucm all." 

II. 

For the only time in his symphonies, Beethoven in this case put his scherzo 
second in order and before the slow movement. A scherzo it is in everything but 
name, with the usual repeats, trio, and da capo (with bridge passages added). 
There is the dancelike character of earlier scherzos, and an echo of rusticity in the 
trio, recalling the Sixth and Seventh. Yet all is lifted to the prevailing mood of 
rarified purity as this movement, like the others, adds a new voice to an old form. 

[10] 



This scherzo has been called "a miracle of repetition in monotony," by virtue of 
the incessant impact of its rhythm (associated with the kettledrums, tuned in 
octaves) which keeps a constant course through the most astonishing variety in 
modulation, color, counterpoint. The movement begins as a five-voice fu^nie re- 
calling the face that Beethoven first conceived the theme as the subject for a fucnie 
— the earliest of his sketches which eventually found its way into the svmphonv. 
The trio continues the contrapuntal interest by the combination of two themes^ 
The famous passage for the oboe against wind chords reminded Berlioz of "the 
effect produced by the fresh morning air, and the first ravs of the risino- sun in 
May." ' ° 

III. 

The slow movement is built upon two themes whose structural relation lies 
principally in contrast: the first, adagio in B-flat, 4-4 time, the second, andante 
moderato in D major, triple time. After the almost static adagio, the second theme 
attains flowing motion in its melody, which Beethoven has marked "espressivo." 
This theme recurs in alternation with the other, but unlike the other is hardly 
varied, except in the instrumentation. The adagio theme undergoes variations of 
increasingly intricate melodic ornament like those by which Beethoven also lifted 
his last sonatas and quartets to such indescribable beauty. 

IV. 

The finale opens with a frank discord, followed by a stormy and clamorous 
presto of seven bars. It is as if the composer, having wrested from his first three 
movements the very utmost drop that was m them, is still restless and unsatisfied. 
He must still advance upon his divine adventure, cast off his tragic or poignant 
moods, find some new expression, fulsome and radiant. A few measures of each 
movement are reviewed, and after each a recitative in the 'cellos and basses gives an 
answer of plain rejection; in the first two cases brusquely, in the case of the adagio 
softened by a tender memory. Beethoven's instruments seem on the very verge 
of speech. A hint of the coming choral theme is breathed in gentle accents by the 
wood winds, to which the recitative, now no longer confined to the strings, gives a 
convincing affirmative. Thereupon the theme in full is unfolded in its rightful D 
major. It is first heard in the utter simplicity* of the low strings in unison, piano. 
Gradually harmonies and instruments are added, until the exposition has been 
completely made. 

Once more there is the noisy presto passage, and the composer introduces words 
for the first time into a symphony. The baritone has this recitative: 



* The choral theme has come in for some slighting remarks, probably on account of its 
ABC simplicity. It need scarcely be pointed out that a basic simplicity, treated with in- 
finite subtlety and variety, is the very essence of the score from the first measure to the 
last. It is not without significance that Beethoven refined and poUshed this theme through 
two hundred sketches, to attain its ultimate beauty and perfection. There are no lack of 
distinguished advocates for the theme. Grove wrote: "The result of years and years of 
search, it is worthy of all the pains which have been lavished on it, for a nobler and more 
enduring tune surely does not exist." "Wagner: "Beethoven has emancipated this melody 
from all influences of fashion and variations of taste, and has raised it into a type of pure 
and lasting humanity." Tovey (to use a recent authority) says as much, in his way, in 
three words, calling it simply "a great theme." 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 



[11] 



"O Freunde, nicht diese Tone, Oh friends, no longer these tones of 

sondern lasst uns angenehmere sadness! 

anstimmen, und freudenvollere." Rather sing a song of sharing and of 

gladness! 
Oh Joy, we hail Thee! 

There immediately follow the first three verses of Schiller's Ode,* by the solo 
quartet and chorus: 



Freude, schoner Gotterfunken, 
Tochter aus Elysium, 
Wir betreten feuertrunken, 
Himmlische, dein Heiligthum. 



Deine Zauber binden wieder. 
Was die Mode streng getheilt; 
A lie Menschen werden Briider, 
Wo dein sanfter Fliigel weilt. 



Joy, thou spark from heav'n immortal 
Daughter of Elysium! 
Drunk with fire, toward Heaven ad- 
vancing 
Goddess, to thy shrine we come. 

Thy sweet magic brings together 
What stern Custom spreads afar; 
All mankind knows all men brothers 
Where thy happy wing-beats are. 



Wem der grosse Wurf gelungen, 
Fines Freundes Freund zu sein, 
Wer ein holdes Weib errungen, 
Mische seinen Jubel ein! 
Ja — wer auch nur eine Seele 
Sein nennt auf dem Erdenrund! 
Und wer's nie gekonnt, der stehle 
Weinend sich aus diesem Bund. 



He whose luck has been so golden 
Friend to have and friend to be. 
He that's won a noble woman. 
Join us in our jubilee. 
Oh if there is any being 
Who may call one heart his own 
Let him join us, or else, weeping. 
Steal away to weep alone. 



Freude trinken alle Wesen 
An den Briisten der Natur; 
Alle Guten, alle Bosen 
Folgen ihrer Rosenspur. 
KiXsse gab sie uns und Re ben, 
Einen Freund, gepriXft im Tod; 
Wollust ward dem Wurm gegeben, 
Und der Cherub steht vor Gott. 



Nature's milk of joy all creatures 
Drink from that full breast of hers; 
All things evil, all things lovely, 
Rose-clad, are her followers. 
Kisses are her gift, and vine-leaves. 
Lasting friend on life's long road; 
Joy the humblest worm is given, 
Joy, the Seraph, dwells with God. 



* The English translation here given has been made for the Boston Symphony Orchestra by 
Theodore Spencer, and is copyrighted. 

It may be noted here that of the eight verses of Schiller's poem, Beethoven chose the first 
three verses, at first without their four-line choruses, and then added three choruses in suc- 
cession, one of them, "Froh, wie seine Sonnen fliegen," belonging to the fourth verse, which 
otherwise he did not use. obviously choosiner these lines for their militant possibilities. Bee- 
thoven could scarcely have set more of the text ; to set three stanzas required from him the 
longest sjrmphonic movement which had ever been composed. Yet Grove thought that 
Beethoven was deterred by the "bad taste" of some of Schiller's verses. A line which the 
Englishman fastens upon in horrified italics as "one of the more flagrant escapades" is this : 
"Dieses Glas dem guten Geist!" ("This glass to the good Spirit!") 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

YIOLOrS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



[12] 



The four line chorus (to the unused fourth verse) summons in Beethoven's 
imagination a marching host, and he gives it to proud and striding measures "alia 
marcia," adding piccolo, double-bassoon, triangle, cymbals, and bass drum to his 
orchestra (a^ain for the first time in a symphony). This is the verse, given to the 
tenor solo and chorus: 



Froh, wie seine Sonnen fliegen 
Durch des Himmels prdcht' gen Plan, 
Wandelt, Briider, cure Bahn, 
Freudig, wie ein Held zum Siegen. 



Glad as the suns that God sent flying 
Down their paths of glorious space. 
Brothers, now forget all sadness 
Joyful run your hero's race. 



After the excitement of this variation, Beethoven allows himself to be alone 
with his instruments once more, and for the last time, in a double fugue. The 
chorus next sings (andante maestoso) the following short verse of far-flung import, 
calling upon three trombones to add to the impressiveness of the sonority: 



Seid umschlungen, Millionen! 
Diesen Kuss der ganzen Welt! 
Briider — iiberm Sternenzelt 
Muss ein lieber Vater wohnen! 



O embrace now all you millions. 
With one kiss for all the world. 
Brothers, high beyond all stars 
Surely dwells a loving Father. 



A religious adagio in a mood of mystic devotion is the setting of the following 
verse: 



Ihr sturzt nieder, Millionen! 
Ahnest du den Schopfer, Weltf 
Such' ihn iiberm Sternenzelt! 
Ueber Sternen muss er wohnen. 



Kneel before him, all you millions 
Know your true Creator, man! 
Seek him high beyond all stars, 
High beyond all stars adore Him. 



But the key verse of the movement is the first: "Freude, schoner Gotterfunken," 
and this, with its chorus: "Seid umschlungen, Millionen," is resumed by the quartet 
and chorus, and finally exalted to its sweeping climax in the coda, prestissimo. 



The Problem of the Final Chorus 

Thayer summarily dismisses the "fantastic notion that the Sym- 
phony was conceived ab initio as a celebration of joy." The evidence 
is incontrovertible that the composer, contemplating a possible 
musical setting of Schiller's Ode at various times of his life, seems not 
to have considered it for a symphony. First it was to be a ''durch 
komponirtes Lied''; later it was to be introduced into an overture in 
"disjointed fragments." When in 1812, Beethoven wrote of a "Sinfonie 
allemand," he became vague, projecting two symphonies. We know 
that he first sketched an instrumental finale for the Ninth, and finally 
brought in his voices only after anxious self-questioning. Czerny has 
left to posterity the explicit statement that after the first performance 
Beethoven thought of composing a new instrumental finale, a state- 
ment which Schindler emphatically denied. Thayer bestows his usual 
judicious paragraph to this controversy, and decides that although 
Beethoven very likely held such thoughts — "he had witnessed the 
extraordinary demonstration of delight with which the whole work 
had been received and he may have found it as easy as some of his 
commentators to believe that his device for presenting the choral 
finale as the logical and poetically just outcome of the^ preceding 
movements had been successful despite its obvious artificiality." 

[13] 



Thayer adds, with sober reason: "Beethoven labored hard to estab- 
lish arbitrarily an organic union between the ode and the first move- 
ments." 

It is specious to argue that the introduction of the text is inverse or 
forced logic. There is no logic in tones except the plausibility which 
the compK)ser's conviction creates. Beethoven never reached a conclu- 
sion with a stirer sense of inevitability. The instrumental Finale which 
he earlier contemplated would have been more pleasing to the purists. 
A Finale on the theme later to be used in the A minor Quartet would 
have sustained the elevation and other- worldliness of the Symphony. 
Its quality of swiftness and ethereal lightness, as if in flight, would 
have followed the Adagio with fine effect. Developed and concluded 
with more grandeur than in the Quartet, it would have rounded out 
a symphony more balanced and homogeneous than any symphony 
with a choral Finale could have been. But when Beethoven, tardily 
as usual, saw his way clearly, he knew that an instrumental rondo 
was simply what had occurred to him by the habit of convention. His 
aim had advanced beyond considerations of classical balance. It had 
become exploratory, upstriving. His heart demanded the sounding 
word, and must recall to proclaim it the battalions of human voices 
lately used in the Mi^sa Solemnis. Again, as in that work, the idea 
controls, combines elements traditionally alien, and sweeping all else 
aside, soars to its close. 

There always came the point where his plan became clear to him- 
self, fixed with definition. And that point once reached, nothing was 
altered. "I change many things," wrote Beethoven to the composer 
Schloesser in 1823 (the very year of the Ninth Symphony), "discard 
and try again, until I am satisfied. Then, however, there, begins in 
my head the development in every direction and, inasmuch as 1 know 
exactly what I want, the fundamental idea never deserts me — it arises 
before me, grows. I see and hear, and the picture in all its extent and 
dimensions stands before my mind like a cast and there remains for 
me nothing but the labor of writing it down."* When once Beethoven 
had seen the picture of the Finale clearly before him, had bridged the 
way from the wordless instrumental voices to the human voice and 
found the way to introduce his text, his instinct, as always, led him 
with direct and intensive utterance, to the end. 



* Beethoven also wrote to Rochlitz in 1822 — "You see, for some time past I have not been 
able to write easily. I sit and think, and think, and get it all settled; but it won't come on 
the paper, and a great work troubles me immensely at the outset; once eet into it, and it's 
aU right." 

[copyrighted] 



<^/ 



[H] 



LIST OF WORKS 

Performed in the Evening Series 
DURING THE SEASON 1948^1949 

C. p. E. Bach. ...... .Concerto in D major for Stringed Instruments 

(Arranged for Orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg) 

IV March 16 

Barber Concerto for Viohn and Orchestra 

Soloist: Ruth Posselt II January 12 

Beethoven Symphony No. 1, in C major, Op. 21 

V April 13 
Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92 

I November 10 

Symphony No. 9 in D minor, \vith final 

chorus on Schiller's Ode to Joy, Op. 125 

V April 13 
Joint Choir of the 

Juilliard Chorus and the Collegiate Chorale 
Prepared by Robert Shaw 

Soloists 
Frances Yeend^ Soprano David Lloyd^ Tenor 

Eunice Alberts^ Contralto James Pease, Bass 

Brahms Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56A 

I November 10 

CowELL Hymn and Fuguing Tune No. 2 

II January 12 

Foss Recordaie 

II January 12 
(First performance in New York. Conducted by the Composer.) 

HoNEGGER Symphony for Strings 

I November 10 

Piston ; Symphony No. 3 

II January 12 

Schuman American Festival Overture 

II January 12 

Stravinsky Concerto for Piano and Wind Orchestra 

(with Double-Basses) 
Soloist: SouLiMA Stravinsky III February 16 

* Concerto in D for String Orchestra 

III February 16 

Ode in Three Parts, for Orchestra 

III February 16 

Orpheus, Ballet in Three Scenes 

(First concert performance in New York) HI February 10 

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor. Op. 36 

IV March 16 

Vaughan Williams Symphony No. 6 

IV March 16 

Vivaldi Concerto in D minor for Orchestra 

I November 10 
Igor Stravinsky conducted the concert of February 16 

[15] 




-/ 




%Cff€imi h if 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they brin 
you a wealth of their greatest performances fo 
encore after encore! Among them: 

• Ma Mere L'Oye Suite — Ravel. The Boston Symphony Or 
chestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor, DM-1268, $3.50. 

• Symphony No. 4, in A, Op. 90 ("Italipn")— Mendelssohn 
The Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor. 
RCA Victor Album DM-1259, $4.75. 



THE WORLD'! 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs through 
the "Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor "Crestwood"! Hear 

your treasured recordings brillianHy reproduced! De luxe automatic record 
changer with "Silent Sapphire" permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short- 
wave radio, AC. Victrola 8V151. "Victrolc"— T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 

[16] 




HAVE YOU HEl 



p 




YEHUDI MENUHIN 






• Sonata No. 1 — Bortok. Yehudi Menuhin, with Adolph Bailer 
otthe piano. Album DM-1286, $6. 

• Concerto for Violin and Orchestra No. 1, in G Minor, Op. 

; 26— Bruch. Yehudi Menuhin, v/ith the San Francisco Symphony 
Orchestra, Pierre Monteux, Conductor. RCA Victor Red Seal 
Album DM-1023, $4.75. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclusive 
of locol taxes. ("DM" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 

ATEST ARTISTS ARE | I'M J 



THE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



»^ 



[17] 



To the 

Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



At a Testimonial Dinner to be held in honor of 
Dr. Koussevitzky in Symphony Hall, Boston, on 
May 2nd, the Friends of the Orchestra will present 
to Dr. Koussevitzky a scroll bearing the names of 
all who, at his request, have joined in making the 
biggest gift ever made to the Orchestra in its long 
history. 

The scroll will include not only the 3,300 names 
of those who have already enrolled, but in addi- 
tion the names of all who may desire to take the 
opportunity between now and May 2nd to par- 
ticipate in this fitting tribute to our great Con- 
ductor. In the scroll reference will also be made to 
contributions that have come to us through our 
radio listeners. 

Those whose honored names are listed on the 
following pages are members of our Society out- 
side the Boston area. 

To them in particular I have been asked by the 
Trustees to express their deep gratitude for loyal 
and generous support during this Anniversary 
Year. 

Edward A. Taft 
Chairman^ Anniversary Fund 

Those who may desire to enroll before April 30th may 
do so simply by sending a check payable to Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra, addressed to the Friends of the Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston 15, Massachusetts. Such gifts 
are tax deductible. 



[18] 



Non-resident Friends of the Boston 

Symphony- Orchestra and 

Contributors to the Anniversary Fund 

in Honor of Serge Koussevitzky 

Season of 1948-1949 



Dr. and Mrs. George Abeloff— Biooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Herbert Abraham— New York City 

Mrs. George Abrich— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Laurence Achilles— New York City 

Mrs. William Ackerman— Ne\v York City 

Miss Edith Adler— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Adler— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. John G. Aldrich— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Putnam C. Aldrich— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Allen— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. Harold L. Ailing— Rochester, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd V. Almirall— New York 
City 

American Committee for the Weizmann In- 
stitute of Science, Inc., New York City 

Lt. Col. John L. Ames— Washington, D.C. 

Mrs. Copley Amory— Washington, D.C. 

Miss Cora G. Amsden— Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Anderson— Providence. 
R.I. 

Mr. Philip T. Andrews— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. R. Ed^vards Annin, Jr.— East Greenwich, 
R.I. 

Anonymous— Providence, R.I. 

Arnold, Mrs. George C— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. George C. Arvedson— Detroit, Mich. 

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Ashtori— Morrisville. 
Pa. 

Mr. Fred B. Avakian— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Donald S. Babcock— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Margaret L. Babcock— Seekonk, Mass. 
Miss Katherine E. Backus— Toledo, Ohio 
Mrs. Cornelia M. Baekeland— New York City 
Mr. George A. Baker, Jr.— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Harvey A. Baker— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. John H. Baker— New York City 
Mrs. Edward L. Ballard— New York City 
Mr. Frederick C. Balz— Englewood, N.J. 
Miss Helen L. Bass— Cranford, N.J. 
Dr. and Mrs. Reuben C. Bates— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernal W. Bates— Branford, 

Conn. 
Miss Jane Bauer— Upper Montclair, N.J. 
Mr. Emil J. Baumann— Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Mr. Gerald F. Beal— New York City 
Mrs. Howard W. Beal— New York City 



Mr. and Mrs. Jean Bedetti— Miami Beach, 

Fla. 
Beethoven Club of Providence— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Frank Begrisch— New York City 
Beinecke Foundation— New York City 
Mrs. Albert M. Bell— Long Island, N.Y. 
Mrs. Haughton Bell— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Mary Benedict— Santa Barbara, Calif. 
Dr. and Mrs. Emanuel W. Benjamin— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Miss Georgina Bennett— Hackensack, N.J. 
Mrs. Winchester Bennett— New Haven, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar F. Berg— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Emilie Berger— East Greenwich, R.I. 
Mrs. Henri L. Berger— Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Anna Berley— Crowpond, N.Y. 
Dr. Beatrice Bergman— New York City 
Mr. Louis K. Berman— New York City 
Mrs. Henry J. Bernheim— New York City 
Mr. Theodore F. Bernstein— New York City 
Miss Dorothy L. Betts— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Rene Bickart— New York City 
Mrs. A. W. Bingham, Jr.^New York City 
Miss Mary Piatt Birdseye— New York City 
Blackstone Valley Music Teachers' Society— 

Pawtucket, R.I. 
Miss Margaret G. Blaine— New York City 
Mr. Michael Blasco— New York City 
Mr. Jacob Blaustein— Baltimore, Md. 
Misses Ada and Janet Blinkhorn— Providence, 

R.L 
Miss Muriel F. Bliss— Attleboro, Mass. 
Hon. and Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss— Washing- 
ton, D.C. 
Dr. Rhea C. Blue— Washington, D.C. 
Mrs. Edward C. Blum— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Julius Blum— New York City 
Mr. Robert E. Blum— Brooklyn N.Y. 
Miss Mildred A. Blumenthal— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. Sidney Blumenthal— New York City 
Mrs. David Blumstein— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Henry Boehm— New York City 
Dr. Walter S. Boernstein— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Bogin— Springdale, 

Conn. 
Mr. A. Bolnick— Elmer, N.J. 
Mr. E. Bonoff— Woodmere, N.Y. 
Mr. Adolphe E. Borie— Santa Barbara, Calif. 

[19] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mr. and Mrs. John W. Bowden— Irvington, 
N.Y. 

Mr. Alfred C. Bo\\ man— Long Island, N.Y. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Braids— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. Selma M. Breitenbach— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brier— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. N. E. Brill— New York City 

Mrs. Richard de Wolfe Brixey— Ne^v York City 

Mrs. Elsie S. Bronson— Basye, Va. 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis B. Brooks— Providence, 
R.I. 

Miss Clara Jane BroAvn— Waterport, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Nicholas Brown— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mrs. Robert P. BroAvn— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Herbert S. Brussel— New York City 

Miss Billy Bryant— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Warren Bubier— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. Charles W. Bubier, Sr.— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Walker Buckner— New York City 

Miss R. Ethel Bugbee— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Arthur M. Bullowa— New York City 

Dr. and Mrs. Alex M. Burgess— Providence, 
R.I. 

Dr. C. C. Burlingame— Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. J. Campbell Burton— New York City 

Miss Alice D. Butterfield— New York City 

Mrs. Duncan Buttrick— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. F. H. Cabot-New York City 

Mrs. Samuel Hyde Cabot— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. John Hutchins Cady— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Maria L. Camardo- Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Wallace Campbell— Peace Dale, R.I. 

Mrs. D. H. Cardozo, Jr.— New York City 

Mrs. Andrew G. Carey— New York City 

Mrs. H. B. Carey— Farmington, Conn. 

Miss Edith M. L. Carlborg— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Sigfrid H. Carlson— ^Vallum Lake, R.I. 

Miss Gertrude Carpenter— Upper Montclair, 
N.J. 

Mrs. Gilbert Congdon Carpenter— East Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mr. J. N. Carpenter— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. James W. Carpenter— Manhasset, N.Y. 

Miss Mary E. Carpenter— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Otis Swan Carroll— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Miss Anne Carter— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Fred S. Carver-Short Hills, N.J. 

Mrs. W. R. Castle-AV^ashington, D.C. 

Mrs. E. Gerry Chadwick— New York City 

Dr. and Mrs. Francis Chafee— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Gladys E. Chamberlain— New York City 

Mrs. B. D. Chambers-Columbia, S.C. 

Chaminade Club— Edgewood, R.I. 

Mme. Avis Bliven Charbonnel— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. Thomas Cheyne— New York City 

Miss Ottilie Chirite— Detroit, Michigan 

Chopin Club of Providence, R.I. 

Miss Louise Clancy— Riverside, Conn. 

[20] 



Mr. and Mrs. Roger T. Clapp— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic S. Clark, Jr.— New York 
• City 

Mrs. Henry Cannon Clark— Westport, N.Y. 

Miss Sydney Clarke— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Elizabeth Clever— New York City 

Mrs. Sidney Clifford -Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Chalmers D. Clifton— New York City 

Mrs. Jennings Clymer— Philadelphia, Penn. 

Mrs. Henry E. Cobb— Bronxville, N.Y. 

Miss Marian C. Coffin— New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. "William A. Coffin— Englevvood, N.J. 

Miss Dinah Cohen— Bronx, N.Y. 

Mrs. Frank Cohen— New York City 

Dr. Herman Cohen— Bronx, N.Y. 

Miss Miriam Cohen— New York City 

Mr. Wilfred P. Cohen-New York City 

Miss Constance Coleman— New York City 

Mrs. Dayton Colie— South Orange, N.J. 

Mr. Oilman Collier— New York City 

Mr. James C. Collins— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. G. ^V. Colton-Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Dr. A. Lambert Cone— New York City 

Mrs. G. Maurice Congdon— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. W. P. Conklin— Farmington, Conn. 

Miss Theresa R. Coolidge— New York City 

Mrs. Stanley M. Cooper— New Britian, Conn. 

Mrs. Grace M. Cox— Ne^v York City 

Miss Kathryn D. Cox— Manchester, Conn. 

Miss Margaret Cranford— Greenwich, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace F. Creasy— Cranston, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon K, Creigh ton— Long 
Island, N.Y. 

Mrs. F. S. Crofts— Stamford, Conn. 

Miss Anna C. Cromwell— Summit, N.J. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Crone— Jackson 
Heights, N.Y. 

Mrs. Charles Cross— San Francisco, Calif. 

Mrs. Gammell Cross— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Parsons Cross— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Miss Maytie Case Crowell— Manchester, Conn. 

Miss Mary C. Crowell— Warren, R.I. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Cull— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Waldo E. Cummer— Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mrs. Charles C. Cushman— East Providence. 
R.I. 

Mrs. H. W. Cutler— New York City 

Miss Mar)' Daboll— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Emma H. Dahlgren— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Murray S. Danforth— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Lewis H. Davidson— Englewood, N.J. 
Mrs. William H. P. Davisson— Glen Cove, N.Y. 
Mrs. Daniel A. de Menocal— New York City 
Mr. Vincent Dempsey— University City, Mo. 
Mr. W. W. Dempster— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Leopold Demuth— New York City 
Mr. John Deveny— Glendale, Calif. 
Mrs. Paul C. DeWolf-Providence, R.I. 
Miss Myrtle T. Dexter— Central Falls, R.I. 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mr. Frederick Dietrich— New York City 
Mrs. Robert E. Dietz— New York City 
Mrs. Clarence C. Dittmer— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Charles \V. Dodge-Rochester, N.Y. 
Mrs. L. K. Doelling— New Rochelle, N.Y. 
Mr. Max Doft— Long Island, New York 
Mrs. "Wallace B. Donham— Hamilton, N.Y. 
Dr. and Mrs. George B. Dorff— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Edith A. Dresser— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Elsie J. Dresser— AV'est Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. Robert B. Dresser— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Marian Drur}— Portland, Conn. 
Miss Ethel DuBois— New York City 
Mrs. George DuBois— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. A. H. Duerschner— Flushing, N.Y. 
Mr. Charles E. Duquette, Jr.— Commicut, R.I. 
Miss Flora E. Dutton— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Margaretta L. Dwight— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Charles R. Eas ton— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. C. E. Eaton— Orange, N.J. 

Mrs. Ed^vard R. Eberle— Providence, R.I. 
I Miss Florence L. Eccles— ^V^aterbury, Conn. 

Mrs. Edna Eckstein— Long Island, N.Y. 

Miss Cornelia Ann Eddy— New Orleans, La. 

Miss Edith W, Edwards— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gurney Edwards— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Edwards— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ehlermann— New York City 

Mr. Louis H. Ehrlich— New York City 

Mrs. H. G. Einstein— New York City 

Mrs. Lewis A. Eldridge— Great Neck, N.Y. 

Mrs. N. M. Elias— New York City 
I Mrs. Frank M. Eliot— "Washington, D.C. 
I Mr. and Mrs. Louis Elliott— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Emerson— Providence, 
R.L 

Mrs. Robert S. Emerson— Pawtucket, R.I. 
I Mrs. Edward A. Emery— Providence, R.I. 
' Miss Gertrude J. Emery— Woonsocket, R.L 

Mr. Howard M. Ernst— Harrison, N.Y. 

Mr. Irving N. Espo— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Esty— Pawtucket, R.L 

Miss Anna L. Evans— Providence, R.L 

Mrs. Edmund C. Evans— Malvern, Pa. 

Mrs. William H. Evans, Jr.— Detroit, Mich. 

Miss Caroline S. Eveleth— "Windsor Locks, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Walter G. Everett— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Howard L. Fales— Glendale, R.I. 

Mrs. Edwin A. Famell— Forestdale, R.I. 

Miss Helen M. Fanvell— Lancaster, Pa. 

Mr. Jenner R. Fast— Hillsdale, N.J. 

Mrs. W. R. Fawcett— Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mr. Edward M. Fay— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. W. Rodman Fay— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Feiner— Providence, 

R.I. 
In Memory of Mrs. Pauline B. Fels— New York 

City 



Dr. J. Lewis Fenner— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. Dana H. Ferrin— Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Mr. Sampson R. Field— New York City 

Mr. John L. Firth— Evanston, 111. 

Miss Louise M. Fish— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Miss Mary R. Fitzpatrick— New York City 

Misses Grace and Joan Fletcher— "Warren, R.I. 

Miss Rebecca P. Flint— Troy, N.Y. 

Mrs. Oscar Foley— Tacoma, Wash. 

Mr. and Mrs. George L. Foote— New York City 

Mrs. James S. Ford— Wilmington, Del. 

Mr. Sumner Foid— New York City 

Miss Helen Foster— Buffalo, N.Y. 

Miss Flora Fox— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Dwight Francis— Santa Bar- 
bara, Calif. 

Mrs. Lewis W. Francis— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

In Memory of Mrs. Marie Franklin— New 
York City 

Mrs. Clarke F. Freeman— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hovey T. Freeman— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. William P. H. Freeman— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Arthur L. Friedman— New York City 

Mr. Stanleigh P. Friedman— Ne^v York City 

Miss Helen Frisbie— "Waterbury, Conn. 

Miss E. W. Frothingham— Tarry town, N.Y. 

Miss Edna B. Fry— East Orange, N.J. 

Miss Margaret A. Fuller— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Marjorie Fuller— Stamford, Conn. 



Mr. Stephen Lee Gaillard— Bronxville, N.Y. 
Mrs. Guy P. Gannett— Cape Elizabeth, Maine 
Mr. and Mrs. B. Gardner— New York City 
Miss Frances M. Gardner— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. Herman Gardner— Ne'vv York City 
Miss Marion A. Gardner— New York City 
Mrs. Emil H. Gartner,— Edge-^vood, R.L 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Gatelv— Providence, 

R.L 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie N. Gebhard— Taunton, 

Mass. 
Miss Katharine R. Geddes— Toledo, Ohio 
Mrs. Leo Gershman— Providence, R.I. 
Dr. Donald F. Gibson— Danburv', Conn. 
Mrs. Arthur L. Gillett— Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. Frederick Huntington Gillett— "Washing- 
ton, D.C. 
Mrs. P. H. Glassberg— New York Citv 
Mr. David M. Glassford-Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. R. H. I. Goddard, Jr.— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. A. J. Goldfarb-Ne^v York City 
Mr. Emanuel Goldman— New York City 
Mr. Arthur J. Goldsmith— New York City 
Mrs. M. H. Goodkind-New York City 
Mr. Walter Goodkind-New York City 
Jacob and Libby Goodman Foundation— New 

York City 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Gordan— New York Cit) 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hale Goss— Providence, 

R.I. 
D. S. Gottesman Foundation— New York City 



[21] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mr. Keith H. Goudey— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Harry L. Grant— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. V. Brent Graves— New York City 

Mrs. Percy R. Gray— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Miss Charlotte M. Greene— Warren, R.I. 

Mrs. E. Milo Greene— Westport, Conn. 

Miss Iris Greene— Woonsocket, R.I. 

Mrs. Marion Thompson Greene— New York 

City 
Mrs. W. B. Greenman— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Bertha C. Greenough— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Helen M. Greenough— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. William Bates Greenough— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Rose Greenwald— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Gregory— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Gribbin— Hastings- 

on-Hudson, N.Y. 
Miss Grace C. Griswold— Kent, Conn. 
Mr. Walter W. Gross— New York City 
Mr. Mortimer Grunauer— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Liang Guh— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs, Baldwin Guild— Hastings-on- 

Hudson, N.Y. 
Mrs. Luther Gulick— Bronxville, N.Y. 
Mrs. Leo S. Guthman— Chicago, 111. 

Mr. James A. Haertlein— Maracaibo, 
Venezuela 

Miss Anna C. Hallock— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. N. Penrose Hallowell— New 
York City 

Dr. Edmund H. Hamann— Riverside, Conn. 

Mrs. Edward C. Hammond— New London, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Jerome J. Hanauer— New York City 

Mr. Frank R. Hancock— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. George F. Handel— New York City 

Miss Edith G. Hardwick— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. F. M. G. Hardy— Redding, Conn. 

Miss Louise Harris— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Jean L. Harry— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. Henry C. Hart— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. S. F. Hartman— New York City 

Miss Anna Hartmann— Shorewood, Wisconsin 

Mrs. J. C. Hartwell- Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Samuel C. Harvey— New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. Jonathan H. Harwood— East Greenwich, 
R.I. 

Miss Elizabeth Hatchett— New York City 

Miss Jane J. Hawley— New York City 

Mrs. Harold B. Hayden— Plattsburgh, N.Y. 

Mrs. David S. Hays— New York City 

Miss Dorothy M. Hazard— Cranston, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Clifford D. Heathcote— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mrs. Irving Heidell— New York City 

Miss E. Adele Heller— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. E. S. Heller-New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis L. Hemingway— New 
Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. S. B. Hemingway— New Haven, Conn. 

[22] 



Mrs. Ell wood Hendrick— New York City 

Miss Bessie Hepstonstall— Edgewood, R.I. 

Mr. Jacques Hermann— New York City 

Mrs. Ross V. Hersey— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Daniel C. Hey, Jr.— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Paul Hey mann— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. David B. Hill-Glendale, Calif. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Whiley Hilles— Ham- 
den, Conn. 

Mr. Robert L. Hilliard— Kingston, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Himmelblau— West 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Frank L. Hinckley— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Walter A. Hirsch— New York City 

Mrs. Benjamin Lewis Hirshfield— New York 
City 

Mr. Harold K. Hochschild— New York City 

Mrs. Paul H. Hodge— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Arthur Hodges— Lakeville, Conn. 

Mrs. H. Hoermann— Roseland, N.J. 

Mrs. Kenneth Hoffman— Darien, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hofheimer— New York 
City 

Mrs. Lester Hofheimer— New York City 

Mrs. Bernard J. Hogue— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. G. M. Hollstein— New York City 

Mrs. Regina Holzwasser— New York City 

Mr. Henry Homes— New York City 

Miss Myra H. Hopson— Kent, Conn. 

Mr. Edwin R. Horn— Allen town, Penn. 

Mrs. C. H. Horner— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Priscilla P. Horr— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Rosalie Housman— New York City 

Mrs. E. H. Howard— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Eva Howell— Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 

Mrs. James W. Hubbell— Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Mrs. Lea Hudson— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Huebsch— New York City 

Mrs. Karl Humphrey— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Alice Arnold Hunt— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Carlos F. Hunt— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Charlotte A. Hunt— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. John C. Hunt— Washington, Conn. 

Miss Ruth Hunt— East Orange, N.J. 

Mrs. R. L. Hutchins— New York City 

Miss Libbie H. Hyman— Millwood, N.Y. 

Mr. Hans A. Illing— Los Angeles, Calif. 

Miss Gertrude V. Ingersoll— New York City 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard H. Ingling— Springfield, 
Ohio 

Mrs. Arthur Ingraham— Little Compton, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earle Nye Ingraham— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Miss Louise M. Irelin— New York City 

Mrs. Leopold Jaches— New York City 

Mrs. F. Ellis Jackson— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Lilian Jackson— Garden City, N.Y. i 

Mr. and Mrs! Robert E. Jacobson— Providence, ' 

R.L 
Mrs. George W. Jacoby— New York City 
Mrs. H. K. James— Hamden, Conn. 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mr. Halsted James— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Jarcho— New York City 

Miss Edith L. Jarvis— New York City 

Mrs. Edward P. Jastram— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Philip S. Jastram— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Pierre Jay— New York City 

Mrs. Theodore C. Jessup-Ridgefield, Conn. 

,Mr. Charles Jockwig— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Melvin F. Johnson— Shreveport, La. 

Miss Dorothy E. Joline— New York City 

Mrs. Theodore H. Joseph— Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

Mr. George E. Judd, Jr.— Oklahoma City, 

Oklahoma 
Mr. \Villiam M. Judd-New York City 
Mrs. Stanley Judkins— Larchmont, N.Y. 

Mrs. A. W. Kaffenburgh-New York City 

Mr. Leo B. Kagan— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart B. Kaiser— Washington, 

D.C. 
Miss Sarah F. Kaminsky— New York City 
Mr. Maxim Karolik— Newport, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Karrel— New York City 
Mrs. B. S. Kaufman-New York City 
Mrs. Herbert M. Kaufmann— New York City 
Mrs. F. Kaulsen, Jr.— New York City 
Mrs. George A. Keeney— Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Mrs. Sidney A. Keller— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Livingston Kelley— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard A. Kelley— Valley Falls, 

R.I. 
Mr. William D. Kelley, Jr.— ^Vallingford, 

Conn. 
Miss Florence B. Kelly— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Florence M. Kemp— New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Frederick B. Kent— Barrington, R.I. 
Miss Jane Kerley— New York City 
Mr. H. D. Kesten— Saddle River, N.J. 
Mrs. ^Villard A. Kiggins— Summit, N.J. 
Mrs. Warner King— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Eugene A. Kingman— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Thomas J. Kingston— Merchantville, N.J. 
Miss Ellen Kirk— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Klebar-New York City 
Mr. Frederick B. Klein— Yonkers, N.Y. 
Mrs. H. C. Knapp-Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor W. Knauth— New York 

City 
Miss Edith Kneeland— New York City 
Miss Anita E. Knight— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred A. Knopf— New York 

City 
Mrs. Elsa Koenig— Los Angeles, Calif. 
Mrs. Paul H. Kolb- Winston-Salem, N.C. 
Mr. Louis Konigsberg— New York City 
Mr. David P. Kopeck— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Lewis Henry Koplik— New York City 
Mr. \\^illiam A. Koshland— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto L. Kramer— New York 

City 
Mrs. Fred Krause— New York City 
Miss Sarah Kreutzenauer— New York City 



Mr. Paul R. Ladd-Providence, R.I. 

David and Joan Landman— New York City 

Mr. Jacob Landy— New York City 

Mrs. J. B. Lane— New York City 

Mrs. Jesse E. Langsdorf— New York City 

Miss E. Gertrude Lawson— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Benjamin Lazrus— New York City 

Mr. Elliott H. Lee— New York City 

Miss Stella Lee— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Clement Lenom— New York City 

Miss Priscilla H. Leonard— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mr. William Lepson— New York City 

Mrs. Austin T. Levy— HaiTisville, R.I. 

Miss Esther Levy— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lewinsohn— Brooklyn, 

N.Y. 
Mr. Daniel Lieberfeld— New York City 
Mrs. Joseph L. Lilienthal— New York City 
Mrs. Richard F. Lindsay— Honolulu, T.H. 
Miss Marion Litchfield— New York City 
Willoughbv Little Foundation— Providence, 

R.I. 
Dr. Henry D. Lloyd— Little Compton, R.I. 
Mrs. M. I. Lockwood— New York City 
Edwin LoewT Foundation, Inc.— New York 

City 
Mr. Ronald S. Longlev— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. Farnsworth Loomis— Tuxedo Park, N.Y. 
Mr. J. E. Lopez— Ne^v York City 
Miss Helen D. Loring— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. George Y. Loveridge— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Mrs. Madeline M. Low— New York City 
Mrs. Ralph G. Lumb— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mr. J. M. Richardson Lyeth— New York City 
Miss Margaret H. Lyman— New York City 

Mr. Hugh F. MacColl-Providence, R.I. 

MacDowell Club— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Vivien MacKenzie— Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Mrs. Kenneth B. MacLeod— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Janet S. MacLeod— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Norman D. MacLeod— Kenyon, R.I. 

Commodore and Mrs. Gary Magruder— James- 
town, R.I. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert L. Mahood— Maple- 
wood, N.J. 

Mrs. Theodore R. Malsin— Scarborough, N.Y. 

Mrs. Gwendoline Manuel— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Allen Markoff— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Samuel F. MarkofE— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Marks, Jr.— New 
York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Marks— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mr. W. G. Marquette— Pleasantville, N.Y. 

Mrs. Albert E. Marshall— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Margaret Marshall— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Christina K. Martin— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Marti ne— Palisades, N.Y. 

Mr. Charles E. Mason, Jr.— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Gabriel R. Mason-Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Stanley H. Mason— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Hazen Y. Mathewson-Providence, R.I. 

[23] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mrs. Frank W. Matteson— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Katharine Matthies— Seymour, Conn. 
Miss Elaine A. Mauger— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Charles H. May— New York City 
Mrs. Edgar Mayer— Tarrytown, N.Y. 
Mrs. Edwin Mayer— Ncav York City 
Mr. David H. McAlpin— New York City 
Mr. Alan J. McBean— Bronxville, N.J. 
Mrs. Jay C. McClure— New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Irving J. McCoid— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Robert McKelvy— New York City 
Mr. David H. McKillop-Washington, D.C. 
Dr. Christie E. McLeod— Middletown, Conn. 
Miss Helen McPherson— New York City 
Mr. J. Thomas McQuaid— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Miss Helen M. McAVilliams-Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Pauline A Mean— New York City 
Miss Cecille L. Meeker— Cleveland, Ohio 
Miss ^Vilhelmine S. Meissner— Bayside, N.Y. 
Miss Hortense Mendel— New York City 
Mr. Ralph J. Mendel —New York City 
Mr. Nils Menendez— Los Angeles, Calif, 
Mr. Paul A. Merriam— Edgewood, R.I. 
Mrs. Charles H. Merriman— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. E. Bruce Merriman— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Marie Mesrobian— Forest Hills, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Pierce Metcalf— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Houghton P. Metcalf— Middleburg, Va. 
Mrs. Jesse H. Metcalf— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Alfred Mever— New York City 
Mrs. K. G. Meyer-New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Meyer— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Miller— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mr. Alex Miller— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Arthur H. Miller— New York City 
Mrs. M. J. Miller-Westfield, N.J. 
Mrs. Rosalie \V. Miller— Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 
Mrs. R. D. Moffett-New York City 
Miss J. Edith Monahan— New York City 
Mrs. G. Gardner Monks— "W^ashington, D.C. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Montchyk— South 

Orange, N.J. 
Miss Eva A. Mooar— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Taylor More— New York City 
Miss Frances K. Morris— Menlo Park, Calif. 
Miss Ruth Morris— New York City 
Miss Alice L. Morse— New York City 
Mr. William H. Mortensen— Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. David P. Moidton— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Mowry— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Irene L. Mulick— Cranston, R.I. 
Miss A. Andrea Munster— East Greenwich, 

R.I. 
Miss Linda Musser— Muscatine, Iowa 

Mr. and Mrs. George W. Naumburg— New 

York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Naumburg— New 

York City 
Miss Evelyn Necarsulmer— New York City 
Miss Grace M. Neill— Woodstock, Conn. 
Miss M. Louise Neill— Woodstock, Conn. 

[24] 



Miss Katharine B. Neilson— Buffalo, N.Y. 

Dr. Harold Neuhof— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Neuss— Bayonne, 
N.J. 

Mr. John S. Newberry, Jr.— Grosse Pointe 
Farms, Mich. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Newburger— New 
York City 

Dr. Anne Newhall— Los Alamos, NeAv Mexico 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Nickerson— ^Vest Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Mrs. J. K. H. Nightingale— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. J. K. H. Nightingale, Jr.— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. E. W. Nolle— New York City 

Miss Lillie Norman— New York City 

Mrs. Bertha Obermeyer- New York City 
Miss Marian O'Brien— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. Robert J. Ogborn— New York City 
Miss Emma Jessie Ogg— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Barbara Quint Oldman— Eggertsville, 

N.Y. 
Mrs. Sydney OUiver-Hollis, N.Y. 
Mrs. George H. Opadyke— "West Hartford, 

Conn. J 

Miss Ida Oppenheimer— New York City ' 

Dr. and Mrs. Seymoiu- Oppenheimer— New 

York City 
Mr. Edwin M. Otterbourg— New York City 

Miss Bertha Pagenstecher— New York City 
Miss Alice Temple Parkin— New York City 
Miss Esther Pauline Parsons— Johnston, R.I. 
Dr. and Mrs. Harold J. Pearce— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Henr)' H. Pease— New York City 
Mrs. Frederick S. Peck— ^Vest Barrington, R.I. 
Miss Hilda M. Peck— Bristol, Conn. 
Mrs. \V. H. Peckham-Sloatsburg, N.Y. 
Mr. Dwight A. Peirce— Scotia, N.Y. 
Mrs. Lionelle Perera— New York City 
Mrs. Charles E. Perkins— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Jess Perlman— Madison, Conn. 
Mr. Max Perlstein— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Peters— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Carl H. Pforzheimer— Purchase, N.Y. 
Miss Lillian Phelps— San Antonio, Texas 
Mr. Norman A. Phemister— Long Island, N.Y. 
Mrs. Clarence H. Philbrick— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. George F. Phillips— Bristol Highlands, 

R.I. 
Miss Jean R. Phillips— Washington, D.C. 
Mrs. Max Pick— New York City 
Mrs. Francis C. Pinkham— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert R. Plant— Providence, 

R.I. 
Miss Janet F. Piatt— Milford, Conn. 
Mrs. George A. Plimpton— Berkeley, Calif. 
Miss Grace L. Plimpton, Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Mary L. Plimpton— Hartford, Conn. 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mr. and Mrs. C, B. Podmaniczky— Brooklyn, 
N.Y. 

Mrs. Emery M. Porter— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. George Eustis Potts— Ormond Beach, Fla. 

Mrs. T. I. Hare Powel— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Alvin L. Po-vvell— Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Miss Dorothy Powell— New York City 

Mr. Ralph A. Powers— New London, Conn. 

Mrs. William Prall-New York City 

Mrs. F. E. Pratt-New York City 

Mrs. H. Irving Pratt, Jr.— Long Island, N.Y. 

Miss Rose Presel— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. James Quan— Ne^v York City 

Mrs. Albert E. Rand— Barrington, R.I. 

Mrs. Alice K. Ratner— San Francisco, Calif. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan M. Ravenal— Providence, 
R.I. 

Miss Jeanne E. Raymond— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Frederic B. Read— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Ludwig Regensteiner— Cranston, R.I. 

Mrs. A. William Reggio— "^Vashington, D.C. 

Mrs. Clara B. Relyea-Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. John Harsen Rhoades— New York City 

Miss Dorothy L. Rice— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Eva Rich— Ne^v York City 

Mr. Charles A. Riegelman— New York City 

Mr. Martin L. Riesman— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Helen E. Roby— Detroit, Mich. 

Mrs. John L. Rochester— Buffalo, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Roitman— Cranston, 

R.L 
Mr. Edward Ronicker— West Milton, Ohio 
Mrs. Moritz Roos— New York City 
Miss Hilda M. Rosecrans— New York City 
Mr. Abraham Rosenbaum— Bronx, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Rosenberg— New York 

City 
Miss Bertha Rosenthal— New York City 
Mr. Laurence B. Rossbach— New York City 
Mr. Michael Rostovtzeff— New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Aaron H. Rubenfeld— Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Mrs. T. Rubinsky— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Ralph C. Runyon— New York City 
Miss Sarah B. Russell— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Thomas W. Russell— Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Aaron B. Salant— New York City 
Lady Salter— New York City 
Mr. Charles F. Samson— New York City 
Mr. Jacob H. Scheuer— New York City 
Mrs. David Scheyer— Birmingham, Mich. 
Mr. Henry G. SchifP-New York City 
Mrs. Fred Schloss— New York City 
Mrs. Emy Schlossinger— New York City 
Mr. Adolf Schmid— Leonia, N.J. 
Dr. David Schoen— Long Island, N.Y. 
Mr. Arthur Schooley— Kansas City, Mo. 
Miss Helen E. Schradieck— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Carl Schraysshuen— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. J. Schullinger— New York City 
Mr. Arthur A. Schwarz— Providence, R.I. 



Mr. Harry A. Schwartz— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Richard S. Schwartz— Chicago, 111. 
The Misses Scott— New York City 
Miss Sarah Eaves Scott— Darien, Conn. 
Miss Edith Scoville— New York City 
Mrs. Wallace M. Scudder— Newark, N.J. 
Miss May Seeley— New York City 
Mrs. Carl Seeman— New York City 
Mrs. Isaac W. Seeman— New York City 
Mrs. George Segal— Long Island, N.Y. 
Mr. and 'Sirs. Lester F. Shaal— Edgewood, R.I. 
Mr. Philip M. Shapiro— Washington, D.C. 
Dr. and Mrs. Ezra A. Sharp— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Ellen D. Sharpe— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dexter Sharpe— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Mr. Edwin F. Sherman— Barrins'ton, R.I. 
Miss Elizabeth P. Sherman— Plainville, Conn. 
Miss Florence Sherman— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Helen ^I. Shire— New York City 
Dr. and Mrs. E. Shorr— New York City 
Mrs. Reinhard Siedenburg— Greenwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Robert E. Simon— New York City 
Mr. Ben Sinel— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. B. A. Sinn— New York City 
Dr. Olga Sitchevska— New York City 
Mrs. Waldron Slutter— Garden City, N.Y. 
Miss Alice E. Smith— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Edgar L. Smith— New York City 
Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith— New York 

City 
Miss Hope Smith— Providence, R.L 
Miss Jean Barclay Smith— Lemoyne, Pa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Smith— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. ^Villiam Smith— New York City 
Miss Marion E. Solodar— New York City 
Mrs. I. S. Solomon— New York City 
Mr. Albert Spalding— New York City 
Mrs. Ernest H. Sparrow— New York City 
Miss Frieda S. Spatz— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Girard Spencer— New York City 
Miss Ada Sperber— New York City 
Mrs. Harold E. Squire— Mount Vernon, N.Y. 
Mrs. Philip B. Stanley— New Britain, Conn. 
Mr. Lewis M. Stark— New York City 
Miss Sophie B. Steel— Sloatsburg, N.Y. 
Mrs. Arthur Stein— New York City 
Mr. Julius Steiner— New York City 
Mrs. Albert M. Steinert— New York City 
Mr. Meyer Stern— North Bergen, N.J. 
Mrs. William Stanford Stevens— New York 

City 
Mr. M. H. Stieglitz-New York City 
Mrs. W. M. Stobbs— Attleboro, Mass. 
Mrs. Elias A. Stoler— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Jacob C. Stone— New York City 
Mrs. Morris E. Storvk— New York City 
Miss A. W. Stowell-Bronxville, N.Y. 
Miss Aline C. Stratford— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Irwin Strauss— New York City 
Mrs. J. M. Strauss— New York City 
Mrs. B. W. Streifler— Kew Gardens, N.Y. 
Mrs. M. E. Strieby- Maplewood, N.J. 

[25] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Concluded) 



Dr. George T. Strodl— New York City 
Mrs. S. J. Stroheim— New York City 
Mrs. James R. Strong— Short Hills, N.J. 
Mr. S. Clarence Stuart— New York City 
Mrs. Arthur P. Sumner— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. M. A. Sunderland— New York City 
Mrs. Walter I. Sundlun— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Helen T. Sutherland— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Sverdlik— New York City 
Mr. Simon Sverdlik— New York City 
Miss Jean Swift— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Helen Sylvester— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Eliza F. W. Taft— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Louise Talma— New York City 
Mr. Paul Tamarkin— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Jerome Tannenbaum— New York City 
Miss Frances Taussig— New York City 
Mrs. W. F. Terradell-Plainfield, N.J. 
Mr. Thornton C. Thayer— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. John Henry Thompson— Farmington, 

Conn. 
Mrs. R. C. Thomson— Montclair, N.J. 
Miss Ruth F. Thomson— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. Edward L. Thorndike— New York City 
Mrs. Paul Tishman— New York City 
Miss Margaret E. Todd— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. S. H. Tolles, Jr.-Cleveland, Ohio 
Mr. Stirling Tomkins— New York City 
Mr. Joseph H. Towle— Philadelphia, Penn. 
Mrs. R. H. Trott— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Elsie R. Trowbridge— New Haven, Conn. 
Miss Ruth True— Spring Valley, N.Y. 
Mr. Howard M. Trueblood— New York City 
Miss Alice Tully— New York City 
Mr. Robert C. Turnbull— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Marie E. Uhrhock Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. Carl J. Ulmann— New York City 

Mrs. Sophie Kerr Underwood— New York City 

Miss Dorothy Utterback— Lincoln, Nebraska 

Mrs. W. E. VanBoskirk-Cranford, N.J. 

Miss Catherine S. VanBrunt— Kitchawan, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Byron E. VanRaalte— Hewlett, 
N.Y. 

Dr. and Mrs. T. Wayland Vaughan, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Miss Anne T. Vernon— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Richmond Viall— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Seth C. Vining— Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Edwin C. Vogel— Greenwich, Conn. 

Mrs. Tracy Voorhees— New York City 

Miss Hazel M. Walker— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mrs. Helen W. Walker— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ashbel T. Wall— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Frederic A. Wallace— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Edwin J. Walter— New York City 
Miss Anne S. Wanag— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss M. Beatrice Ward— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Allen Wardwell— New York City 

[26] 



Mr. Eugene Warren— Troy, N.Y. 

Mrs. George B. Waterhouse— Apponaug, R.I. 

Mr. Phillips R. Weatherbee— Providence, R.I. 

In memory of Mrs. George H. Webb— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Miss Mabel Webb— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Webber— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. Arthur P. Weeden— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Elizabeth G. Weeks— Providence, R.I. 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Weil— New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. Leon J. Weil— New York City 

Mr. Robert C. Weinberg— New York City 

Mr. Louis Weisberg— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Weisberg— Providence, 
R.I. 

Miss Deborah D. Weisel— Springfield, Mo. 

Mrs. Conrad B. Wessell— Wilmington, N.C. 

Miss Mary Wheatland, New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. A. R. Wheeler— Newport, R.I. 

Mrs. L. R. Wheeler— New York City 

The Mary C. Wheeler School— Providence, 
R.I. i 

Miss Ruth A. Whipple— Cranston, R.I. 

Mrs. Gustave J. S. White— Newport, R.I. 

Mrs. Osborne White— Kentfield, Calif. ■ 

Miss Rosa White— Larchmont, N.Y. ' 

Mrs. Robert H. Whitmarsh— Providence, R.I., 

Miss Helen L. Whiton— Westerly, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. George N. Whittlesey— Brook- 
lyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. H. VanWyck Wickes— Rye, N.Y. 

Mr. Herbert W. Widmann— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Anna U. Wilcox— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Morton Wild— New York City 

Mr. Irwin Wile— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs, Louis P. Willemin, Jr.— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mr. G. Wightman Williams— Washington, 
D.C. 

Mrs. Grace E. Williams— Providence, R.I. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. W. Williams— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Williamson— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mrs. Hugh D. Wilson— Passaic, N.J. 

Miss Ellen Winsor— Malvern, Penn. 

Miss Mary Withington— New Haven, Conn. 

Misses Anna and Tillie Wolff— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Misses Blanche M. and Ellen A. Wolff- 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Claude M. Wood— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Mabel Woolsey— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Carroll M. Wright— New York City 

Mr. Lucien Wulsin— Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mr. Philip Wyman— Cincinnati, Ohio 

Miss Pearl Yanofsky— New York City 
Mr. Ellis L. Yatman— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Art Yellen-Buflfalo, N.Y. 

Mrs. August Zinsser— Ridgefield, Conn. 



I 



I 



THE NINTH SYMPHONY 

Claude Debussy 

Quoted from "Monsieur Croche, Aritidilettante" 

A FOG of verbiage and criticism surrounds the Choral Symphony. 
It is amazing that it has not been fully buried under the mass of 
prose which it has provoked. Wagner intended to complete the orches- 
tration. Others fancied that they could explain and illustrate the theme 
by means of pictures. If 'we admit to a mystery in this Symphony w^e 
might clear it up; but is it worth while? There was not an ounce of 
literature in Beethoven, not at any rate in the accepted sense of the 
word. He had a great love of music, representing to him, as it did, 
the joy and passion piteously absent from his private life. Perhaps we 
ought in the Choral Symphony to look for nothing more than a mag- 
nificent gesture of musical pride. A little notebook with over two 
hundred different renderings of the dominant theme in the Finale of 
this Symphony shows how persistently Beethoven pursued his search 
and how entirely musical his guiding motive was; Schiller's lines can 
have only been used for their appeal to the ear. Beethoven determined 
that his leading idea should be essentially self-developing and, w^hile 
it is of extraordinary beauty in itself, it becomes sublime because of its 
perfect response to his purpose. It is' the most triumphant example of 
the moulding of an idea to the preconceived form; at each leap forward 
there is a new delight, without either effort or appearance of repetition; 
the magical blossoming, so to speak, of a tree whose leaves burst forth 
simultanously. Nothing is superfluous in this stupendous work, not 
even the Andante, declared by modern aestheticism to be over long; 
is it not a subtly conceived pause between the persistent rhythm of the 
Scherzo and the instrumental flood that rolls the voices irresistibly 
onward to the glory of the Finale? Beethoven had already written eight 
symphonies and the figure nine seems to have had for him an almost 
mystic significance. He determined to surpass himself. I can scarcely 
see how his success can be questioned. The flood of human feeling 
which overflows the ordinary bounds of the symphony sprang from a 
soul drunk with liberty, which, by an ironical decree of fate, beat 
itself against the gilded bars within which the mis-directed charity of 
the great had confined him. Beethoven must have suffered cruelly in 
his ardent longing that humanity should find utterance through him; 
hence the call of his thousand-voiced genius to the humblest and poor- 
est of his brethren. Did they hear it? That is the question. Recently the 
Choral Symphony was performed together with several of Richard 
Wagner's high-spiced masterpieces. Once again Tannhauser, Siegmund 

[27] 



and Lohengrin voiced the claims o£ the leit-motif! The stern and loyal 
mastery of our great Beethoven easily triumphed over this vague and 
high-flown charlatanism. 

It seems to me that the proof of the futility of the symphony has 
been established since Beethoven. Indeed, Schumann and Mendelssohn 
did no more than respectfully repeat the same forms with less power. 
The Ninth Symphony none the less was a demonstration of genius, a 
sublime desire to augment and to liberate the usual forms by giving 
them the harmonious proportions of a fresco. 

Beethoven's real teaching then was not to preserve the old forms, 
still less to follow in his early steps. We must throw wide the windows 
to the open sky; they seem to me to have only just escaped being closed 
for ever. The fact that here and there a genius succeeds in this form 
is but a poor excuse for the laborious and stilted compositions which 
we are accustomed to call symphonies. 

The young Russian school has endeavoured to give new life to the 
symphony by borrowing ideas from popular melodies; it has succeeded 
in cutting brilliant gems; but are not the themes entirely dispropor- 
tionate to the developments into which they have been forced? Yet the 
fashion for popular airs has spread quickly thoughout the musical 
world— from east to west the tiniest villages have been ransacked and 
simple tunes, plucked from the mouths of hoary peasants, find them- 
selves, to their consternation, trimnaed with harmonic frills. This gives 
them an appearance of pathetic discomfort, but a lordly counterpoint 
ordains that they shall forget their peaceful origin. 

A symphony is usually built up on a chant heard by the composer as 
a child. The first section is the customary presentation of a theme on 
which the composer proposes to work; then begins the necessary dis- 
memberment; the second section seems to take place in an experimental 
laboratory; the third section cheers up a little in a quite childish way 
interspersed with deeply sentimental phrases during which the chant 
withdraws as is more seemly; but it reappears and the dismemberment 
goes on; the professional gentlemen, obviously interested, mop their 
brows and the audience calls for the composer. But the composer does 
not appear. He is engaged in listening modestly to the voice of tradition 
which prevents him, it seems to me, from hearing the voice that speaks 
within him. 



^^Q^ 



[28] 



"i'f!ffl'i'ilipiininTFriiiiirfrii!iiiTpiiiiiffPi'HI!]^iiiiilipiini|]y!iii'i[piiiil^^ 



CARNEGIE HALL 



SEASON OF 1949-1950 



"Boston Symphony Orchestra 

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor 
Sixty-fourth Season in New York 



nnpn 



Two Series of Five Concerts Each 

Five Five 

WEDNESDAY SATURDAY 

Evenings at 8:45 Afternoons at 2:30 

november 9 november 12 

december 7 december 10 

january 11 january 14 

february 15 february 18 

march 15 march 18 



nTipm 



Renewal cards have been mailed to subscribers. 



I /ill applications and communications should he addressed to 

GEO. E. JUDD, Manager 
SYMPHONY HALL. BOSTON 

lin.iyilllliujyillUmll|lllMI#lliHllJlj]lliirllillllMHl[]^ 

[29] 









^■•v. \" :^^'{>- 



^r ^ 






*-^->i 









^ r 















^; ,:,-:.^*% \^0 






k ' .©*|--^ 









.1fe^ ^i^ 



,Si^^m , ,ig^m-.. 



LIST OF WORKS 

Performed in the Afternoon Series 
DURING THE SEASON 1948 ^ 1949 

Beethoven. Symphony No. i, in C major. Op. 21 

V April 16 
Symphony No. 9 in D minor, with final 

chorus on Schiller's Ode to Joy, Op. 125 

V April 16 
Joint Choir of the 

Juilliard Chorus and the Collegiate Chorale 
Prepared by Robert Shaw 
Soloists 
Frances Yeend, Soprano David Lloyd, Tenor 

Eunice Alberts, Contralto James Pease, Bass 

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor. Op. 68 

IV March 19 

Copland A Lincoln Portrait 

Speaker: Wesley addy II January 15 

Debussy "La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques 

IV March 19 

Diamond Rounds for String Orchestra 

II January 15 
Fine , . . Toccata Concertante 

(First performance in New York) II January 15 

Hanson Concerto in G major for Pianoforte and 

Orchestra, Op. 36 
Soloist: Rudolf Firkusxy II January 15 

Harris Symphony No. 3 (in one movement) 

II January 15 

Hill Music for English Horn and Orchestra, Op. 50 

Soloist: Louis Speyer II January 15 

Prokofieff Symphony No. 5, Op. 100 

I November 13 

RoussEL Suite in F major. Op. 33 

IV March 19 

Ravel Concerto for Piano and Orchestra 

Soloist: Jesus ^L\RIA Sanroma I November 13 

"Daphnis et Chloe," Ballet (Second Suite) 

I November 13 

Satie Two "Gymnopedies" 

(Orchestrated by Debussy) 
IV March 19 

Stravinsky Capriccio, for Piano and Orchestra 

Soloist: Soulima Stravinsky HI February 19 

Concerto in D for String Orchestra 

III February 19 

Ode in Three Parts, for Orchestra 

III February 19 

Orpheus, Ballet in Three Scenes 

III February 19 

Igor Stravinsky conducted the concert of February 19 

[31] 



DOUBLE BASS RECORDS 

By Serge Koussevitzky 

The Anniversary Album of Double 
Bass records by Serge Koussevitzky (pri- 
vate souvenir pressing) is now on sale at 
the Box Office. The proceeds (at $10 
each) will benefit the Koussevitzky 25th 
Anniversary Fund. 

Address mail orders to Symphony Hall, Boston 15, 
Mass. ($10 includes shipping charge). 



• THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 

CONCERT BULLETIN 

• THE BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 

PROGRAM 

• THE BOSTON POPS PROGRAM 

The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra 

PUBLICATIONS 

Coverage: Higher Income Groups 
Positions: All Conspicuous 
Rates: Moderate 



Total Circulation More Than 600,000 



For Information and Rates Call 

Mrs. Dana Somes, Advertising Manager 

Tel. CO 6-1492, or write : 

Symphony Hall, Boston 15, Mass. 



[32] 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Oilman in the 
N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.00 per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. _ 

V 




VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^'"^^m.m,?""^!"^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E. Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos Xo. 2, 3. 4. 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 8. I'relnde in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2. 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis ; 

Overture to "Egmont" 

Berlioz Symphony, "Ilarold in Italy" ( Primrose) 

Three Pieces, •"Damnation of Faust," Overture. "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico." "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "I^a Mer." Sarabande 

Faur6 "Pelleas et Melisande." Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto ; Air from "Semele" (Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording); 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto ( Soloist : William Kai)ell > 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-fiat (184) : C major 

(338) : Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij^," Suite ; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf"; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) : 

Pavane. Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. ^ 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sonsa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidelia" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring." "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (Sanromfi) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5. 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 




lai^UJtn 



The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — 'Mt is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIN PliHO CONPM 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin aho builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON, HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 



Brooklyn Programmes 






BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
"^xj-- HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 






era 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
1948-1949 

Academy of Music, Brooklyn 

Under the auspices of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Soences 
and the Philharmonic Sooety of Brooklyn 



1948-1949 

BROOKLYN COMMITTEE 



FOR 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra Concerts 



Mr. Adrian \'an Sinderen 
Chairman 



Mrs. H. Haughtoii Bell 
Executive Chairman 



Mrs. Edward C. Blum 
J' ice-Chairman 

Mrs. William G. James 
Chairman Membership 

Dr. Joseph Dana Allen 
Mrs. Ernest Ash 
Hon. William R. Bayes 
Miss Dorothy Betts 
Afrs. George M. Billings 
Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert E. Blum 
Mrs. Bruce Bromley 
Mrs. Samuel T. Brown 
Mrs. Walter Bruchhausen 
Mrs. Irving L. Cabot 
Mrs. Otis Swan Carroll 
Mrs. Oliver G. Carter 
Mrs. Thomas F. Casey 
Mrs. Francis T. Christy 
Mrs. Ellwood Colahan 
Mrs. Gordon W^eir Col ton 
Mrs. Russell V. Cruikshank 
Mrs. Sidney W. Davidson 
Mrs. Mary C. Draper 
Mrs. Remick C. Eckhardt 
Mrs. Merrill N. Foote 
Mrs. Lewis W. Francis 
Mr. and 

Mrs. George H. Gartlan 
Mrs. Edwin L. Garvin 
Mrs. Charles R. Gay 
Mrs. Silas M. R. Giddings 
Mr. Andrew L. Gomory 
Mrs. William B. Greenman 



Mrs. ^Villiam H. Good 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Carroll J. Dickson 
Vice-Chnirman 

Mrs. ^Villiam P. Hamilton 
Mr. and 

Mrs. Walter Hammitt 
Mr. Frank R. Hancock 
Mrs. James M. Hills 
Miss Elsie Hincken 
Mr. William T. Hunter 
Mrs. Irving G. Idler 
Mrs. George H. Her 
Mrs, Raymond V. IngersoU 
Mrs. Henry A. Ingraham 
Mrs. Robert F. Ives 
Mrs. Charles Jaffa 
Mrs, Hans V. Kaltenborn 
>[rs. Miles Kastendieck 
Mrs, Maxwell Lester 
Mrs. Edith Lincoln 
Miss Jessie Lockitt 
Mrs, ^Villiam H, Lohman 
Mrs, Frederick D, MacKay 
Mrs, Thomas H, McClintock 
Mrs. Edwin P. Maynard, Jr. 
Miss Charlotte Morgan 
Mrs, Leonard P, Moore 
Miss Emma Jessie Ogg 
Mrs, Dean C, Osborne 
Mrs. William M. Parke 
Mrs. William B. Parker 
Mrs. Frank H. Parsons 
Mrs.AVilliam P. Pashley 



Mrs. Henry }. Davenport 

Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Luella "Wilson Vaile 
Chairman Boxes 

Mrs. Charles E. Perkins 
Mr. Charles Pratt 
Mrs. Benjamin Prince 
Mr. G. William Rasch 
Miss Agnes Ritchie 
Mrs. Charles E. Rogers 
Mrs. Frederick H. Rohlfs 
Mrs. Donald Ross 
Mrs. Rupert A. Root 
Mrs. Ir\ ing J. Sands 
Mrs. F. R. Schepmoes 
Mrs. Robert W. Shearman 
Mrs. Frank E. Simmons 
Mrs. E. A. Sunde 
Mrs. Ernest K. Tanner 
Mrs. Hollis K. Thayer 
Mr. Carl H. Tollefsen 
Mrs, Walter Truslow 
Mrs. Adrian \'an Sinderen 
Mrs. Peter V. D, \'oorhees 
Mrs, Clarence Waterman 
Mrs. Morris ^Vatkins 
Mrs. Walter F. AVatton 
Mrs. Walter F. Wells 
Mrs. George N. Whittlesey 
Mrs. William H. \Vhitton 
Hon. George A. Wingate 
Mrs. Maude B. Wood 
Miss Elizabeth ^Vright 






I9a4\¥vi949 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
First Concert 

FRIDAY EVENING, November 12 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot • . President 

. Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



[1] 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Serge Koussevitzky, Music Director 

October 5, 1948 
Dear Mr. Taft: 

You have asked ho^v you and other devoted members 
of the Friends of the Orchestra can express to me in* 
tangible form your "appreciation and gratitude" on my 
twenty-fifth anniversary as Conductor. Truly there is only 
one way in which I would wish you to do this — by a 
gift to the Orchestra, a big gift. 

World conditions are so uncertain and conditions here 

are so unsettled that even such an institution as the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra, with all its maturity, fine 

traditions and high ideals, is vulnerable. Its permanence 

should be insured. You and the Trustees will know best 

how this should be accomplished. 

» 
I would consider it the finest of all personal tributes 

if my friends should take this occasion to give convincing 
proof that this splendid orchestra to which I have de- 
voted my best efforts for nearly a quarter of a century 
shall never flounder or fall through lack of adequate 
financial support. 

Faithfully yours, 




(See page 4) 

\ ' 

[2] 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

FIRST CONCERT 

FRIDAY EVENING, November 12, at 8:30 o'clock 

Program 

Prokofieff Symphony No. 5, Op. 100 

I. Andante 

II. Allegro moderato 

III. Adagio 

IV. Allegro giocoso 

INTERMISSION 

Ravel Concerto for Piano and Orchestra 

I. AUegramente 
II. Adagio assai 
III. Presto 

Ravel "Daphnis et Chloe," Ballet (Second Suite) 

Lever du jour — Pantomime — Danse gen^rale 

SOLOIST 

JESI5S MARIA SANROMA 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

[31 



live 



KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY 
FUND ESTABLISHED 



again 
these 
moments . . . 

realistically reproduced 
with the 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 

FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme. $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 



PERMO /ncorporafed 

Chicago 26 



The establishment of the Serge Kous- 
sevitzky Anniversary Fund of the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra has been an- 
nounced by the Orchestra's Trustees. 
The sum asked is $250,000 for use 
without restrictions for cultural and edu- 
cational development by the Orchestra, 
and as a cushion against emergencies. It 
is to be a revolving fund in the sense 
that any withdrawals in any one year 
are to be restored as soon as practicable. 
The Trustees consider the Anniversary 
Fund as a prudent step in "long term 
planning." 

Henry B. Cabot, President of the 
Trustees, has stated in a communica- 
tion to the Friends of the Orchestra: 
"For twenty-five years our Orchestra 
has been under the inspired directorship 
of Serge Koussevitzky. ." . . It is proper 
that we who enjoy the concerts of our 
Orchestra and take pride in its continu- 
ing success should seize this occasion 
to record in tangible form our apprecia- 
tion of Dr. Koussevitzky's magnificent 
contribution to the fame of our historic 
institution. It is hoped that many others 
will care to join us in paying tribute to 
a worthy conductor who has served us 
so long and with such integrity and de- 
votion. It is his desire that any such 
expression should take the form of a 
gift to the Orchestra." 

Dr. Koussevitzky, in a letter to Edward 
A. Taft, the chairman, has warmly en- 
dorsed this plan. The letter is printed 
on page 2. 

All communications concerning the 
Fund should be sent to Mr. Edward A. 
Taft, Symphony Hall, Boston. 




[4] 



SYMPHONY NO. 5, Op. 100 

By Serge Prokofieff 

Born in Sontsovka, Russia, April 23, 1891 



ProkofiefiE composed his Fifth Symphony in the summer of 1944. It had its first 
performance in Moscow on January 13, 1945, when the composer conducted. The 
symphony had its first American performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
November g, 1945. 

The orchestra required consists of two flutes, two clarinets, E-flat clarinet and 
bass clarinet, two oboes and English horn, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four 
horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, cymbals, 
harp, piano, military drum and strings. 

PROKOFIEFF composed his First ("Classical") Symphony in igi6- 
1917 and his Fourth (Op. 47) in 1929, dedicating it to this or- 
chestra on its fiftieth anniversary. It was after fifteen years of much 
music in other forms that he composed another. Robert Magidoff, 
writing from Moscow to the New York Times (March 25, 1945) , de- 
scribed the Fifth Symphony. Prokofieff told the writer that he had been 
working upon this Symphony "for several years, gathering themes for 
it in a special notebook. I always work that way, and probably that is 
why I write so fast. The entire score of the Fifth was written in one 
month in the summer of 1944. It took another month to orchestrate 
it, and in between I wrote the score for Eisenstein's film, 'Ivan the 
Terrible.' " 

"The Fifth Symphony," wrote MagidofiF, "unlike Prokofieff's first 
four, makes one recall Mahler's words: *To write a symphony means 
to me to create a whole world.' Although the Fifth is pure music and 
Prokofieff insists it is without program, he himself said, *It is a sym- 
phony about the spirit of man.* " 

It can be said of the symphony in general that the broad construc- 
tive scheme of the four movements is traditional, the detailed treat- 
ment subjective and daring. 

The opening movement. Andante j is built on two full- voiced 
melodic themes, the first in triple, the second in duple beat. Contrast 
is found in the alternate rhythm as both are fully developed. There 
is an impressive coda. The second movement has earmarks of the 
classical scherzo. Under the theme there is a steady reiteration of a 
staccato accompaniment, 4-4. The melody, passed by the clarinet to 
the other wood winds and by them variously treated, plays over the 
marked and unremitting beat. A bridge passage for a substantial wind 
choir ushers in (and is to usher out) the trio-like middle section, which 
is in 3-4 time and also rhythmically accented, the clarinet first bearing 
the burden of the melody. The first section, returning, is freshly 
treated. At the close the rhythm becomes more incisive and intense. 
The slow movement. Adagio, 3-4 (9-8), has, like the scherzo, a per- 
sistent accompaniment figure. It opens with a melody set forth espres- 

[5] 



sivo by the wood winds, carried by the strings into their high register. 
The movement is tragic in mood, rich in episodic melody. It carries 
the symphony to its deepest point of tragic tension, as descending 
scales give a weird effect of outcries. But this tension suddenly passes, 
and the reprise is serene. The finale opens Allegro giocoso, and after 
a brief tranquil (and reminiscent) passage for the divided 'cellos 
and basses gives its light, rondo-like theme. There is a quasi-gaiety 
in the development, but, as throughout the Symphony, something 
ominous seems always to lurk around the corner. The awareness of 
brutal warfare broods over it and comes forth in sharp dissonance — as 
at the end. 

Prokofieff completed his Sixth Symphony last autumn, and described 
it in a letter of September 6 to the Am-Rus Division of the Leeds 
Music Corporation: "The Sixth Symphony in E minor is in three 
movements; two of them were sketched last summer and at present 
I am working on the third. I am planning to orchestrate the whole 
Symphony this autumn. The first movement is agitated in character, 
lyrical in places and austere in others. The second movement, andante, 
is lighter and more songful. The finale, lighter and major in its 
character, would be like the finale of my Fifth Symphony but for 
the austere reminiscences in the first movement." 

The Symphony was performed in Moscow on Christmas Day, 1947. 
It met with disapproval, and the incident was shortly followed by the 
denunciation of Prokofieff and six other composers by the Central 
Committee of the Communist Party. The new symphony has so far 
been withheld from this country. 

r COPYRIGHTED] 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

Four Year Degree Course Three Year Diploma Course 

Artist's Diploma One Year Preliminary Course Master's Degree 

Courses arranged for special students 

For further information, write the Dean 

290 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited m the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 

[6] 



^EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYERS' LiabUity Ammutee Carpcmion Ltd. 
The EMPLOYEBS' fire /luurance Company 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS' /luuronca ComfMUty 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are firetraps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 





Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[7] 




^mj 





# # 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bring you a wealth of th€ 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

# Symphony No. 5, in B-Flat — Schuberf. Serge Koussevitzlcy conducting the Boston \r. 
Orchestra. Album DM-1215, $4.75. 

# Concerto for Violin, Piano and String Quartet in D, Op. 21 — Chausson. Jesus M( 

Sonroma, Pianist, with Heifetz, Violinist, and the Musical Art Quartet. DM-877, 

# Capriccio — Stravinsky. Jesus Maria Sanroma, Pianist, with the Boston Symphony i ^ 
conducted by Serge Koussevitzky. DM-685, $3.50. Prices include Federal excise tox oi i 
subject to change without notice. ("DM" albums available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 




The newest Crestwood is everything you've wanted in a radio- 
phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out unit. Rich 
tone of the "'Golden Throat." AM, short wave, FM radio. Plays up to 
12 records automatically. "Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC 
Victrola 612V4. ("Victrola"— T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. OfF.) 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 



A 



0> 



TUNE IO- 



CS] 



KOUSSEVITZKY 



stciony 

SU; 

7, 




SANROMA 



iVJ^^'^^^^ 



E RCA VICTOR SHOW STARRING ROBERT MERRILL 5:30 PM SUNDAYS OVER WBZ 

[9] 



CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 

By Maurice Ravel 

Born at Ciboure, Basses Pyrenees, March 7, 1875; died in Paris, December 28, 1937 



This concerto was first performed January 14, 1932, at a Lamoureux concert in 
Paris. Ravel conducted the work and Marguerite Long, to whom it was dedicated, 
was the soloist. It was first heard in America April 22, 1932, on which date the 
orchestra of Boston (Jesiis Maria Sanromd, soloist) and Philadelphia (Sylvain 
Levin, soloist) each performed the work in its own city.* It was repeated (with 
Mr. Sanroma) at a memorial concert, January 28, 1938. 

The orchestration consists of piccolo, flute, oboe, English horn, clarinets in 
B-flat and E-flat, two bassoons, two horns, trumpet, trombone, timpani, triangle, 
side drum, bass drum, cymbals, tam-tam, wood block, whip, harp and strings. 

RAVEL, asked to compose music for performance in the fiftieth 
anniversary season of the Boston Symphony Orchestra (1930-31) , 
spoke of a piano concerto. But the score was not forthcoming from 
the meticulous and painstaking composer. "Ravel worked at it con- 
tinuously for more than two years," so Henry Prunieres reported 
after the completion at the end of 1931, "cloistering himself in his 
home at Montfort I'Amaury, refusing all invitations, and working ten 
and twelve hours a day." Ravel told this writer that "he felt that in 
this composition he had expressed himself most completely, and that 
he had poured his thought into the exact mold he had dreamed." 
In 1931, while this score was still in process of composition, he ac- 
cepted another commission — a commission which he succeeded in 
fulfilling. This was the Piano Concerto for the Left Hand, composed 
for the one-armed pianist, Paul Wittgenstein. The two concertos were 
Ravel's last works of orchestral proportions. 

"The concerto," wrote Henry Prunieres, "is divided into three parts, 
after the classical fashion. The first movement, allegramente, is con- 
structed on a gay, light theme, which recalls Ravel's early style. It 
appears first in the orchestra, while the piano supplies curious 



* Under the heading "Temporal Arithmetic," H. T. Parker commented amusingly in the 
Boston Evening Transcript: 

"To begin with the idle splitting of a hair. This afternoon Dr. Koussevitzky and the 
Boston Orchestra, Mr. Leopold Stokowski and the Philadelphia Orchestra, Mr. Sanroma in 
Boston, Mr. Levin in Philadelphia, are playing for the first times in America Ravel's new 
Piano Concerto. In Symphony Hall and" in the Academy of Music it is second item on the 
program. The Bostonian conductor's first piece is a Concerto for Orchestra by Martelli, rel- 
atively brief; the Philadelphia conductor's Sibelius' Fourth Symphony, appreciably longer. 
Dr. Kausseyitzky and Mr. Sanroma will sound the first measures of Ravel's Concerto ten or 
fifteen minutes before Messrs. Stokowski and Levin do likewise. They will sound the last 
while the Philadelphians are still dallying with the middle periods. Therefore in Boston 
Ravel's Concerto will be heard for the first time in America, Q. E. D. which is also "right 
and proper," since the piece was once intended for the jubilee year, 1930-1931, in Symphony 
Hall. In short, the Boston Orchestra has lost a dedication, but won — by a nose — a 
premiere !" 

[10] 



sonorous effects in a bitonal arpeggiated design. The development 
proceeds at a rapid pace with a surprising suppleness, vivacity, and 
grace. This leads to an andante a piacere where the piano again takes 
the exposition of the theme, while the bassoons, flutes, clarinets, and 
oboes surround it one after another with brilliant scales and runs. 
Then begins a grand cadenza [of trills over arpeggios]. The orches- 
tra enters again discreetly, at first marking the rhythm, and then 
taking up the development, leading to a brilliant conclusion. 

"The second movement, adagio assai, consists of one of those long 
cantilenas which Ravel knows so well how to write and which are 
not without analogy with certain arias of Bach. Evolving over an 
implacable martellato bass, the melody is developed lengthily at the 
piano, then, little by little, the orchestra takes possession of it while 
the piano executes fine embroideries and subtle appoggiaturas. 

"The presto finale is a miracle of lightness and agile grace, and 
recalls certain scherzi and prestos of Mozart and Mendelssohn. The 
orchestra marks a syncopated rhythm while the piano leads the move- 
ment. The spirit of jazz animates this movement as it inspired the 
andante of the sonata for violin and piano, but with great discretion. 
Nothing could be more divorced from the spirit of the pasticcio. 
Nothing could be more French, more Ravel." 

Emile Vuillermoz, who was present at the first performance of the 
Concerto in Paris, recorded for the Christian Science Monitor his 
impressions of the new work: "It is written in the brilliant and trans- 
parent style of a Saint-Saens or a Mozart. The composer has wished 
to write a work exclusively intended to bring out the value of the 
piano. There is in it neither a search for thematic novelty nor intro- 
spective nor sentimental intentions. It is piano — gay, brilliant and 
witty piano. The first movement borrows, not from the technique, but 
from the ideal of jazz, some of its happiest effects. A communicative 
gayety reigns in this dazzling, imaginative page. The Adagio is con- 
ceived in the Bach ideal, with an intentionally scholastic accompani- 
ment, it has admirable proportions and a length of phrase of singular 
solidity. And the Finale in the form of a rondo sparkles with wit and 
gayety in a dizzy tempo in which the piano indulges in the most 
amusing acrobatics. The work is very easy to understand and gives 
the impression of extreme youth. It is wonderful to see how this 
master has more freshness of inspiration than the young people of 
today who flog themselves uselessly in order to try to discover, in 
laborious comedy or caricature, a humor that is not in their tem- 
perament." 

[copyrighted] 



[!'] 



JESUS Maria Sanroma was born in 1903, in Puerto Rico, of Cata- 
lonian parents. He was sent to this country in 1917 by the Puerto 
Rican Government to complete his musical education at the New 
England Conservatory of Music. His teachers have been Mme, An- 
toinette Szumowska in Boston, Alfred Cortot in Paris, and Artur 
Schnabel in Berlin. In 1924 he made his recital debut in Boston, and 
in 1926 his orchestral debut with Serge Koussevitzky and the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra. After touring Europe, he became the official 
pianist of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, and in that capacity par- 
took in the first performances of Hill's Concertino; Dukelsky's 
Dedicaces, Piston's Concertino; the first performances in America of 
Honegger'is Concertino, Stravinsky's "Capriccio," Ravel's Concerto. 

In 1943 he resigned from these duties to devote himself to concert 
tours of both Americas. 



DAPHNIS ET CHLOt - Ballet in One Act - Orchestral 

Fragments 
Second Series: "Daybreak," "Pantomime," "General Dance" 

By Maurice Ravel 
Born at Ciboure, Basses-Pyr^n^es, March 7, 1875; died in Paris, December 28, 1937 



The ballet Daphnis et Chlo6 ' was completed in igia*, and first produced June 8, 
1912 by Diaghileff's Ballet Russe, at the Chdtelet in Paris, Pierre Monteux conduct- 
ing. Of the two orchestral suites drawn from the ballet, the second had its first 
performance at the concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, December 14, 1917 
(Dr. Karl Muck conducting). 

The Second Suite is scored for two flutes, bass flute and piccolo, two oboes 



* This according to Serge Lifar, who was a dancer in the Ballet Russe at that time and 
who states that Daphnis et Chloe was not put on in 1911, "because Ravel was not yet 
ready. At last, in 1912 he sent the orchestral score to Diaghileff." — "La Revue MusicaU,** 
December, 1938. 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 

25 Blagden Street, Bostoh, Massachusetts 



[ 12 ] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^'^^^m^^^S!?^^^"^ 

Bach, C. P. E. Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3, 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 
Copland "El Sal6n Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto No. 12), Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto (Soloist: William Kapell) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 ("Italian") 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kije," Suite ; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf"; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" ; "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Pidelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (SanromS) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5, 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 

[•3l 



and English horn, two clarinets in B-flat, clarinet in E-flat and bass clarinet, three 
bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, four trumpets, three trombones and tuba, 
timpani, bass drum, two side drums, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, castanets, 
celesta, glockenspiel, two harps and strings. A wordless mixed chorus is written 
in the score,- but is optional and can be replaced by instruments. 

IN HIS autobiographical sketch of 1928, Ravel described his Daphnis 
et Chloe as "a choreographic symphony in three parts, commis- 
sioned from me by the director of the company of the Ballet Russe: 
M. Serge de Diaghileff. The plot was by Michel Fokine, at that time 
choreographer of the celebrated troupe. My intention in writing it was 
to compose a vast musical fresco, less scrupulous as to archaism than 
faithful to the Greece of my dreams, which inclined readily enough 
to what French artists of the late eighteenth century have imagined 
and depicted. 

"The work is constructed symphonically according to a strict tonal 
plan by the method of a few motifs, the development of which achieves 
a symphonic homogeneity of style. 

"Sketched in 1907, Daphnis was several times subjected to revision 
—notably the finale." 

There were late revisions. If Ravel's date of igoyf is indeed correct, 
"Daphnis et Chloe" was five years in the making and must indeed 
have many times been "remis surle metier/' as Ravel expressed it, before 
the perfectionist was sufficiently content with his handiwork to release 
it for dancing and for printing. 

Diaghileff, deflecting the principal creative musicians of the day 

(Stravinsky, Strauss, Debussy) to his purposes, could not quite make 

ballet composer^ out of them, and the same may be said of Ravel. 

Nijinsky and Karsavina danced the title parts in the original pro- 



t The date is surprising. Diaghileff's Ballet had its first Paris season in 1909 ; 1909, and 
sometimes 1910, are given as that in which Ravel hegan "Daphnis et Chloe." Roland-Manuel 
thinks that Ravel made a "mistake of two years" in naming 1907, which again is surprisinsr, 
since Roland-Manuel originally wrote the autobiographical sketch at Ravel's dictation. In 
1907 Diaghileff was in Paris and probably had met Ravel, but there was no plan as yet for 
a ballet season in Paris. It is, of course, possible that Ravel's first sketches for "Daphnis et 
Chloe" were purely symphonic in intent, a fact he might not have been quick to admit after 
the vicissitudes of the piece in the theatre. 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 
240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



[14] 



duction. The scenario was by Fokine; the designer of scenery and 
costumes was Leon Bakst. An indifferent success was reported, at- 
tributable in part to a gathering storm of dissension between Fokine 
and Diaghileff. There was considerable dissension within the Ballet 
Russe at the time. Disagreement seems to have centered on the prob- 
lem of a danced presentation of subjects from Ancient Greece. Nijinski, 
even while miming the character of Daphnis, was executing, accord- 
ing to novel ideas of his own, "L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune." It can be 
well imagined that, in the presentation of "Daphnis et Chloe," Nijinski 
and Fokine found it hard to work together. One can further surmise, 
from Ravel's later allusion to "the Greece of his dreams," a "late 
eighteenth century" Greece would not have contributed toward single- 
mindedness in the rehearsals of ''Daphnis.'* Those rehearsals were 
many and extended to the very morning of the first performance. They 
took place, according to Serge Lifar, "under a storm cloud. The corps 
de ballet ran afoul of the 5-4 rhythm in the finale, and counted it out 
by repeating the syllables 'Ser-ge-Dia-ghi-leff,' 'Ser-ge-Dia-ghi-leflE'." 
When the season ended, there duly followed the break between Fokine 
and Diaghileff. As for the music itself, it has found fitful usefulness 
in the theatre, but enjoys a lusty survival in the concert hall. 

The story comes from a document of ancient Greece, and is at- 
tributed to a sophist, Longus, who lived in the second or third cen- 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SECOND CONCERT 

Friday Evenings January I/f. 



[15] 



tury A.D. It is the oldest of countless tales of the love, tribulation and 
final union of a shepherd and shepherdess. The first version of 
Daphnis and Chloe to appear in print was a French translation by 
Amyot, which was printed in 1559. The first English translation was 
made by Angell Dave, printed in 1587. A translation by George Thorn- 
ley (1657) is in current print. Thornley in a preface "to the critical! 
reader," commends the author as "a most sweet and pleasant writer," 
and calls the tale "a Perpetual Oblation to Love; An Everlasting Ana- 
thema, Sacred to Pan, and the Nymphs; and, A Delightful Possession 
even for all." 

The Second Suite is thus identified with the ballet: 

No sound but the murmur of rivulets fed by the dew that trickles from the 
rocks. Daphnis lies stretched before the grotto of the nymphs. Little by little the 
day dawns. The songs of birds are heard. Afar off a shepherd leads his flock. 
Another shepherd crosses the back of the stage. Herdsmen enter, seeking Daphnis 
and Chlo6. They find Daphnis and awaken him. In anguish he looks about for 
Chlo6. She at last appears encircled by shepherdesses. The two rush into each 
other's arms. Daphnis observes Chlo^'s crown. His dream was a prophetic vision; 
the intervention of Pan is manifest. The old shepherd Lammon explains that 
Pan saved Chlo^, in remembrance of the nymph Syrinx, whom the god loved. 

"Daphnis and Chlo^ mime the story of Pan and Syrinx. Chloe impersonates the 
young nymph wandering over the meadow. Daphnis as Pan appears and declares 
his love for her. The nymph repulses him; the god becomes more insistent. She 
disappears among the reeds. In desperation he plucks some stalks, fashions a flute, 
and on it plays a melancholy tune. Chlo^ comes out and imitates by her dance the 
accents of the flute. 

"The dance grows more and more animated. In mad whirlings, Chlo^ falls into 
the arms of Daphnis. Before the altar of the nymphs he swears on two sheep his 
fidelity. Young girls enter; they are dressed as Bacchantes and shake their tam- 
bourines. Daphnis and Chlo6 embrace tenderly. A group of young men come on 
the stage. 

"Joyous tumult. A general dance. Daphnis and Chlo^." 

[copyrighted] 



BOUND VOLUMES of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

CONCERT BULLETINS 

CONTAINING: Analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. JOHN N. BUP.K, 
on all works performed during the season. 

**<tA <iytCusical education in One Volume^^ 
**'Boston*s Remarkable 'Book of Knowledge*"* 

Lawrence Oilman in the N. Y, Herald and Tribune 
Price $6.00 per volume 
^Address-. SYMPHONY HALL . BOSTON, MASS. 



[16] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 

PERSONNEL 

Violins 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Xorbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

\'ladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Vorman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 
Frank Zecchino 

Clarence Knudson 
IMerre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

\'ictor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saver io Messina 

Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberjj 

Bassi.s 
Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 

Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Violas 


li\sS()C)\S 


Joseph de Pasqiiale 


Ravmond A Hard 


Jean Cauhape 


Ernst Panenka 


Georges Fourel 


Ralph Masters 


Eugen Lehner 




Albert Bernard 


Contra- Bassoon 


Emil Kornsand 


Boaz Piller 


George Humphrey 
Louis Artieres 


Horns 


Charles Van Wynbergen 


W^illem Valkenier 


/ 

Hans Werner 


James Staglinno 




Principals 


Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 


Harry Shapiro 




Harold Meek 




Paul Keanev 


V'lOLONCELl.OS 






Walter Macdonald 


Samuel Mayes 


Osbourne McConath\ 


Alfred Zighera 




Jaco]:)US Langendoen 


Trumpets 


Mischa Nieland 


Georges Mager 


Hippolyte Droeghmans 


Roger Voisin 


Karl Zeise 


Principals 


Josef Zimbler 


Marcel Lafosse 


Bernard Parronchi 


Harry Herforth 


Enrico Fabrizio 


Rene Voisin 


Leon Marjollet 






Trombones 


Flutfs 


Jacob Raichman 


Georges Laurent 


Lucien Hansotte 


James Pappoutsakis 


John Coffey 


Phillip Kaplan 


Josef Orosz 


Piccolo 


Tuba 


George Madsen 


Vinal Smith 


Oboi s 


Harps 




Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughe\ 


John Holmes 


Jean Devergie 


Joseph Lukatsky 


Timpani 




Roman Szulc 


English Horn 


Max Polster 


Louis Speyer 






Percussion 


Clarinets 


Simon Sternburg 


Manuel Valerio 


Charles Smith 


Attilio Poto 


Emil Arcieri ^ 


Pasquale Cardillo 


Piano 


E\) Clarinet 


Lukas Foss 


Bass Clarinet 


Librarian 


Rosario Mazzeo 


Leslie Rogers 




lal^ttim 



The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — ^'It is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 



THE BitLDWIDI PIAKIO COMPANV 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON, HOWARD pianos and fhe BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 




BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
1948- 1949 

Academy of Music, Brooklyn 

Under the auspices of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences 
and the Philharmonic Sooety of Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



Violins 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Rrips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 
Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos Pinfield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 
Leon Gorodelzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestrcet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 
Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey " 
Louis Arti^res 

Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 
Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakii 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 
John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 
Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



.<il 



^^^f> 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Second Concert 

FRIDAY EVENING, January 14 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 

[1] 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
ANNIVERSARY FUND 

of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

The goal for this appeal, which will be the only 
appeal during this Anniversary Year, is $250,000 
net after all expenses of the Orchestra for the current 
year have been met. This sum is approximately four 
times as much as the amount contributed by the 
Friends of the Orchestra during the past season. 

All who care to join in honoring Dr. Koussevitzky 
on his twenty-fifth year of service in the only 
manner he wants are invited to enroll as Friends 
of the Orchestra and Contributors to the Serge 
Koussevitzky Fund. 

To enroll, simply send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston i^. "Big" gifts and 
small will be gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 

Gifts received through January 5 are $118,318. 
Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 

FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Edward A. Taft, Chairman 

KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

All gifts to the Orchestra are tax deductible. 



[«] 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SECOND CONCERT 

FRIDAY EVENING, January 14, at 8:30 o'clock 



Program 



CoRELLi Sarabande, Gigue and Badinerie 

(arranged for String Orchestra by Ettore Pinelli) 

Diamond Rounds for String Orchestra 

I. Allegro, molto vivace 
II. Adagio 
III. Allegro vigoroso 

Hanson Concerto in G major for Pianoforte and 

Orchestra, Op. 36 
I. Lento molto e molto tranquillo; allegro deciso 
II. Allegro feroce, molto ritmico 

III. Andante molto espressivo 

IV. Allegro giocoso 

{Conducted by the Composer) 
INTERMISSION 

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor. Op. 68 

I. Un poco sostenuto; Allegro 

II. Andante sostenuto 

III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso 

IV. Adagio; Allegro non troppo, ma con brio 

SOLOIST 

RUDOLF FIRKUSNY 

Mr. FiRKUsxY uses the Steinway Piano 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Network (Station WNBC) Tuesday, 11:30-12:00 P.M. 



[31 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelifone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelifone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelifone 1.25 

Fidelifone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelifone Flooting Point 50c 

I CKIYIU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY MUSIC 
FOUNDATION 

1942: Nicolai Berezowsky — Symphony 

No. 4 
Benjamin Britten — Opera, "Peter 

Grimes" 
Samuel Barber — Composition (in 

preparation) 
Bohuslav Martinu — Symphony 
No. 1 

1942: Bela Bartok — Concerto for Or- 
chestra 

Igor Stravinsky — Ode 

William Schuman — Symphony 
for Strings 

William Bergsma — Second String 
Quartet 

Robert Palmer — String Quartet 

1944: Darius Milhaud — Symphony 

No. 2 
Aaron Copland — Symphony No. 3 
Nikolai LopatnikoflE — Concertino 

for Orchestra 
Burrill Phillips — Overture for 

Orchestra, "Tom Paine" 

1945: Olivier Messiaen — Symphony 
(in preparation) 

Heitor Yilla-Lobos — Madona 

Howard Hanson — Piano Con- 
certo 

Lukas Foss — Capriccio for 'Cello 
and Piano 

Alexei HaiefF — Eclogue for 
'Cello and Piano 

David Diamond — Symphony 
No. 4 

Harold Shapero — Symphony (for 
Classical Orchestra) 

Nikolai Nabokov — "The Return 
of Pushkin" (Soprano and Or- 
chestra) 
1946: Walter Piston — Symphony No. 3 

Marc Blitzsteln — "The Little 
Foxes," Opera (in preparation) 

1947: Roy Harris — Symphony (in 
preparation) 

Francesco Malipiero — Fourth 
Symphony 

Arnold Schonberg — composition 
for symphony orchestra, narra- 
tor and chorus, "Survivor from 
Warsaw" 

Bias Galindo — composition for 
instrument with piano (in prep- 
aration) 

Earl George — composition for 
instrument with piano (in prep- 
aration) Arioso (for 'Cello and 
Piano) 

1948: Randall Thompson — Symphony 
Arthur Honegger — Composition 
for Orchestra 



[4] 



SUITE (SARABANDE - GIGUE - BADINERIE) 
By Arcangelo Corelli 

Born at Fusignano, near Imola, Italy, February 17 (?) , 1653; died at Rome, 

January 8, 1713 

(Arranged for String Orchestra by Ettore Pinelli) 



Corelli wrote five sets of sonatas, each containing twelve numbers, and as a sixth 
opus a set of concerti grossi. His Opus 5, consisting of twelve sonatas for violin, 
with basso continuo ("Suonate a Violono e Violone o Cembalo") was published at 
Rome in 1700. Corelli's famous violin piece, "La Folia" in itself an arrangement 
of a traditional air, is in the last sonata of this series. Ettore Pinelli (1843-1915) 
has chosen three movements from these sonatas for the present suite. 

CORELLI was a personage of widespread fame in his day. The partic- 
ulars of his career are largely fabulous, and little is known of his 
early life. Various anecdotes about him have been handed down, each 
always quoted with an appendage of doubt as to its authenticity. 
Certain it is that he was the prime spirit in the development of 
music by bowed instruments when instrumental music found its first 
full flowering in seventeenth-century Italy. If his was not a profoundly 
original talent, he gave a great impetus to the art of violin playing 
by his example as virtuoso, to solo and concerted music by his com- 
positions, published and widely circulated in his time. 

Of his earlier years little is known, save that he studied violin with 
Giovanni Benvenuti at Bologna, composition with Matteo Simonelli 
at Rome. He became a player in the Capranica Theatre Orchestra in 
Rome as a youth of eighteen. It is said that in the ensuing years he 
exhibited his skill before the Elector of Bavaria at Munich, the Elec- 
tor George at Hanover; the tale is told that when he visited Paris the 
jealous Lulli stirred up so much talk against him that he was obliged 
to leave (this was denied by Fetis) . In 1682 he settled at Rome, and 
as first musician to the Cardinal Ottoboni became forthwith the shin- 
ing light of musical culture in that capital. A celebrity who held a 
similar position at the court of Naples was the elder Scarlatti. Dr. 
Burney relates an anecdote which he learned from "a very particular 
and intelligent friend," who had it from Geminiani, who many years 
before had been Corelli's pupil. Burney's roundabout information is 
to the effect that Corelli, visiting the Neapolitan court, made a glar- 
ing error in performance in which Alessandro Scarlatti had to set 
him straight. That, in the midst of a performance of one of his last 
adagios, "the king, being tired, quitted the room to the great morti- 
fication of Corelli." Returning to Rome, he found his fame somewhat 
supplanted by an upstart musician by the name of Valentini, and 
was thrown into "such a state of melancholy and chagrin as was 

[5] 



thought," said Geminiani, "to have hastened his death." Dying a 
weahhy man, Corelli made the grand gesture o£ bequeathing his en- 
tire fortune, which has been variously named as the equivalent of 
thirty thousand dollars and three hundred thousand dollars, together 
with a fine collection of paintings, to his patron. The Cardinal saw 
his Christian duty, and handed the "saint-seducing gold" to Corelli's 
poor relatives. The pictures his conscience permitted him to retain. 
Corelli has been described as "modest, amiable, simple in his ways 
of life, almost shabbily dressed, always going on foot instead of taking 
a carriage." But there is no lack of extravagant praise from his con- 
temporaries. One of his countrymen called him "II virtuosissimo di 
violino e vero Orfeo di nostri tempi/' and George Mattheson, in Ger- 
many, named him "the prince of all musicians." His pupil, 
Geminiani, issued a more considered judgment. "His merit was not 
depth of learning like that of Alessandro Scarlatti, nor great fancy or 
rich invention in melody or harmony, but a nice ear and most delicate 
taste which led him to select the most pleasing harmonies and melodies, 
and to construct the parts so as to produce the most delightful effect 
upon the ear." 

[copyrighted] 



ROUNDS FOR STRING ORCHESTRA 
By David Diamond 

Born at Rochester, New York, July 9, 1915 



Rounds for String Orchestra was composed in June and July, 1944, by com- 
mission for Dimitri Mitropoulos, and was first performed by this conductor and 
the Minneapolis Symphony Orchestra, November 24 of that year. It was per- 
formed at the Boston Symphony Concerts April 5, 1946. 

At the very outset of the first movement, so the composer explains, 
±\. "the different string choirs enter in strict canonic fashion as an 
introduction for the main subject, which is played by the violas and 
soon restated by the 'cellos and basses. The Adagio is an expressive 
lyric movement, acting as a resting-point between the two fast move- 
ments. The last movement again makes use of characteristic canonic 
devices, though it may more specifically be analyzed as a kind of fugal 
movement cast in rondo form. The rhythmic device which opens the 
first movement is again utilized in the last movement as a kind of 
counter-subject for the principal thematic ideas, so helping to 'round' 
out the entire work and unify the entire formal structure." 
[6] 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYEBS' Liability Aaunutee Ccrpontiom , 
The EMPLOTEBS* Fir* ImturtMite* Camipany 
AMERICAN EMPLOYEBS* Iiuvaitem CampmMy 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our conunon 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . mguiy, many persons die each year fromi 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a dobr bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 

Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 




[7] 




Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs 
through the "Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor 
"Crestwood"! Hear your treasured recordings brilliantly repro- 
duced! De luxe automatic record changer with "Silent Sapphire" 
permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short-wave radio. AC. Victrola 
8V151. "Victrola"—!. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



HAVE YOU HEARD 



[8] 



t 




\l)MifJii<fm^ 



W Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you a wealth of his 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor— Beethoven. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor; with Frances Yeend; Eunice Alberts; 

David Lloyd; James Pease; and the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus under 
^ the direction of Robert Shaw. DM-119a $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor ^Red Seal' 

De Luxe Records), $17. 

• Froncesca do Rimini, Op. 32— Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. Album DM-11 79, $4.75. 

• Symphony No. 5, in B-Flot- Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-1215, $4.75. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclusive of local toxes. 
("DM" and "DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



nSTS ARE 



On> 



mbK%mk 



^h 



NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



Mr. Willi Apel, whose Harvard Dictionary of Music is invalu- 
able when a precise but adequate definition of a musical form is re- 
quired, has this to say about the round: "Common name for a circle 
canon, i.e., a canon in which each singer returns from the conclusion 
of the melody to its beginning, repeating it ad libitum. The result 
of a three-voice round is indicated in the following scheme: 



a b c 

a b 

a 



a b c 

:c a b 

b c a 



It appears that the melody of a round always consists of sections of 
equal length which are so designed as to make good harmony with each 
other. . . . The earliest and most famous round is the Sumer-canon 
of the thirteenth century which is designated as rota (wheel) . I'he 
rondellus of the thirteenth century was much the same thing, pos- 
sibly lacking the initial imitation, i.e., with all the voices starting 
simultaneously (after the repeat sign) .... Rounds enjoyed an ex- 
treme popularity in England, particularly in that variety known as 
catch." 



David Diamond studied violin with Andre de Ribaupierre at the 
Cleveland Institute of Music; composition with Bernard Rogers at 
the Eastman School of Music, with Roger Sessions and Paul Boepple 
in New York, and with Nadia Boulanger at Fontainebleau and Paris. 
He has had numerous fellowships and other awards. 

His orchestral works include the Psalm for orchestra (1935), per- 
formed recently by the San Francisco Symphony under Pierre Monteux; 
Concerto for Violin and Orchestra (1936) ; Suite from the Ballet 
Tom to a scenario by E. E. Cummings (1936) ; Aria and Hymn for 
Orchestra, dedicated to the memory of Albert Roussel (1937) ; an 
Overture for Orchestra (1937) ; Variations for Small Orchestra (1937) ; 
Heroic Piece for small orchestra (1938) ; Elegy in memory of Maurice 
Ravel for. Strings and Percussion (1938); Concerto for 'Cello and 
Orchestra (1938); First Symphony (1940), first performed by tlie 
New York Philharmonic under Dimitri Mitropoulos in 1941; Con- 
certo for Chamber Orchestra (1940) . The Second Symphony, com- 
posed in 1941, had its first performance by the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, October 13, 1944. The Third Symphony was composed in 
1945. The Fourth was performed by this Orchestra January 23, 1948, 
Leonard Bernstein conducting. He composed the incidental music for 
productions of Shakespeare's The Tempest (1944) and Romeo and 
Juliet (1947) . The Second Violin Concerto was composed in 1947. 

[copyrighted] 

[10] 



CONCERTO FOR PIANOFORTE AND ORCHESTR.\ 

By Howard Hanson 

Bom in Wahoo, Nebraska, October 28, 1896 



Howard Hanson has composed this, his only Piano Concerto, by commission of 
the Koiissevitzky Music Foundation. The orchestration calls for two flutes and 
piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three 
trombones and tuba, timpani, xylophone, snare drum, and strings. 

THIS Concerto, despite its four movements, is short in length and 
modest in scope. The coda which concludes the finale brings back 
material from the first movement. The composer has treated the piano 
as a lyrical rather than as a percussive instrument. 

Howard Hanson was born of Swedish parents, Hans and Hilma 
Hanson, at AV^ahoo, Nebraska. First taught by his mother, he continued 
his studies in Luther College and the University School of Music of his 
native State. He studied composition at the Institute of Musical Art 
in New York with Percy Goetschius, and later at the Northwestern 
University School of Music at Evanston, under C. Lutkin and Arne 
Oldberg. Taking his degree in 1916, he taught at the "College of the 
Pacific" in San Jose, California. In 1921 he was elected to a three-year 
fellowship in composition at the American Academy in Rome, Return- 
ing to America in 1924, he was appointed director of the Eastman 
School of Music at Rochester, New York, the position which he now 
holds. 

His First ("Nordic") Symphony was performed at the concerts of 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, April 5, 1929, the composer conduct- 
ing. The Second ("Romantic") Symphony, composed for the fiftieth 
anniversary year of this orchestra, was first performed in that season 
(November 28, 1930) , Serge Koussevitzky conducting. The Third Sym- 
phony had its first concert performance November 3, 1939, by this 
orchestra, the composer conducting. The Fourth Symphony was intro- 
duced by this Orchestra December 3, 1943. 

In addition to the three symphonies. Dr. Hanson's orchestral works 
include the symphonic poems "North and West" (1923), "Lux 
Aeterna" (1923) , and "Pan and the Priest" (1926) . There is an Organ 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

CONCERT BY CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA 

Malcolm H, Holmes, Conductor 

and 

CONSERVATORY CHORUS 

LoRNA Cooke deVaron, Conductor 

BRUCKNER MASS IN E minor 

Jordan Hall, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, February 16 and 17 

at 8:15 p.m. 
Tickets for reserved floor seats free at Jordan Hall Box Office. 



[M] 



Concerto (1926) , and a suite from "Merrimount." "Merrimount," a 
three-act opera to a libretto of Richard Stokes, was produced by the 
Metropolitan Opera Company in New York in 1932. Choral works 
include "The Lament of Beowulf" (1925) ; ''Heroic Elegy" (1927) ; 
Songs from "Drum Taps," after Walt Whitman (1935) '* ^nd a tran- 
scription for chorus and orchestra of Pales trina, 'Tope Marcellus 
Mass" (1937). His Serenade for Flute, Harp, and Strings was per- 
formed by this Orchestra October 25, 1946. Chamber works include a 
piano quintet, a piano quartet, and a string quartet. 

[copyrighted] 



RUDOLF FIRKUSNY 

RUDOLF FiRKUSNY was bom in Napajedla, Czecho-Slovakia, February 
11, 1912. He entered the State Conservatory in Brno (Briinn), 
eventually studying piano with Vilam Kurz and Artur Schnabel, com- 
position with Leo Janacek and Joseph Suk. He made his first public 
appearance at the age of ten with the Philharmonic Orchestra in 
Prague. His career as pianist first brought him to the United States 
for a concert tour in 1938. But when his country was occupied in 
that year he was in Prague, about to depart for a tour of France. He 
succeeded in keeping his engagements and in December, 1940, was 
able to return to the United States. In addition to appearances in 
this country he made a tour of South America in 1943 and of Central 
America in 1944. He appeared with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
November 2-3, 1945, in the first performances of Menotti's Piano Con- 
certo in F major. On April 18, 1947, he performed the Concerto 
No. 1 by Brahms. 

WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Mass. 

[12] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^'^°\„^,?YS'^^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven . Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto No. 12), Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourlan Piano Concerto ( Soloist : William KapeU) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij§," Suite ; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March ; "Peter and 
the Wolf"; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" ; "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No, 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "tFnfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood'' 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (Sanrom^) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5, 6 ; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 

[»3] 



SYMPHONY IN C MINOR, NO. i, Op. 68 
By Johannes Brahms 
Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, 1897 



The First Symphony of Brahms had its initial performance November 4, 1876, 
at Carlsruhe, Otto Dessoff conducting. 

The symphony is scored for two flutes,^ two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings. 
The trombones are used only in the finale. 

THE known fact that Brahms made his first sketches for the sym- 
phony under the powerful impression of Beethoven's Ninth, which 
he had heard in Cologne for the first time in 1854, may have led his 
contemporaries to preconceive comparisons between the two. Walter 
Niemann, not without justice, finds a kinship between the First Sym- 
phony and Beethoven's Fifth through their common tonality of C 
minor, which, says Niemann, meant to Brahms "hard, pitiless struggle, 
daemonic, supernatural shapes, sinister defiance, steely energy, drama- 
tic intensity of passion, darkly fantastic, grisly humor." He calls it 
"Brahms' Pathetic Symphony." 

The dark and sinister side of the C minor Symphony seems to have 
taken an unwarranted hold on the general consciousness when it was 
new. For a long while controversy about its essential character waxed 
hot after every performance. W. F. Apthorp bespoke one faction when 
he wrote in 1878 of the First Symphony that it "sounds for the most 
part morbid, strained and unnatural; most of it even ugly." Philip 
Hale, following this school of opinion, some years later indulged in a 
symbolic word picture, likening the symphony to a "dark forest" where 
"it seems that obscene, winged things listen and mock the lost." But 
Philip Hale perforce greatly modified his dislike of the music of 
Brahms as with the passage of years its oppressive aspects were somehow 
found no longer to exist. 

Instead of these not always helpful fantasies of earlier writers or a 
technical analysis of so familiar a subject, let us turn to the characteris- 
tic description by Lawrence Oilman, the musician who, when he 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[Ml . 



touched upon the finer things in his art, could always be counted upon 
to impart his enthusiasm with apt imagery and quotation: 

The momentous opening of the Symphony (the beginning of an 
introduction of thirty-seven measures, Un poco sostenuto, 6-8) is one 
of the great exordiums of music — a majestic upward sweep of the 
strings against a phrase in contrary motion for the wind, with the 
basses and timpani reiterating a somberly persistent C. The following 
Allegro is among the most powerful of Brahms' symphonic move- 
ments. 

In the deeply probing slow movement we get the Brahms who is 
perhaps most to be treasured: the musical poet of long vistas and 
grave meditations. How richly individual in feeling and expression 
is the whole of this Andante sostenuto! No one but Brahms could 
have extracted the precise quality of emotion which issues from the 
simple and heartfelt theme for the strings, horns, and bassoon in the 
opening pages; and the lovely complement for the oboe is inimitable 
— a melodic invention of such enamouring beauty that it has lured 
an unchallengeably sober commentator into conferring upon it the 
attribute of "sublimity." Though perhaps "sublimity" — a shy bird, 
even on Olympus — is to be found not here, but elsew^here in this 
symphony. 

The third movement (the Poco allegretto e grazioso which takes the 
place of the customary Scherzo) is beguiling in its own special loveli- 
ness; but the chief glory of the symphony is the Finale. 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



THIRD CONCERT 

Friday Evenings February 1 8 



[15] 



Here — if need be — is an appropriate resting-place for that diffi- 
dent eagle among epithets, sublimity. Here there are space and air 
and light to tempt its wings. The wonderful C major song of the 
horn in the slow introduction of this movement (Piii Andante, 4-4), 
heard through a vaporous tremolo of the muted strings above softly 
held trombone chords, persuaded William Foster Apthorp that the 
episode was suggested to Brahms by "the tones of the Alpine horn, 
as it awakens the echoes from mountain after mountain on some of 
the high passes in the Bernese Oberland." This passage is interrupted 
by a foreshadowing of the majestic chorale-like phrase for the trom- 
bones and bassoons which later, when it returns at the climax of the 
movement, takes the breath with its startling grandeur. And then 
comes the chief theme of the Allegro — that spacious and heartening 
melody which sweeps us onward to the culminating moment in the 
Finale: the apocalyptic vision of the chorale in the coda, which may 
recall to some the exalted prophecy of Jean Paul: "There will come 
a time when it shall be light; and when man shall awaken from 
his lofty dreams, and find his dreams still there, and that nothing has 
gone save his sleep." 

[copyrighted] 



• THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 

CONCERT BULLETIN 

• THE BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 

PROGRAM 

• THE BOSTON POPS PROGRAM 

The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra 

PUBLICATIONS 

offer to advertisers wide coverage of 
a special group of discriminating 
people. For both merchandising and 
institutional advertising they have 
proved over many years to be excel- 
lent media. 



Total Circalation More Than 500,000 



For Information and Rates Call 

Mrs. Dana Somes, Advertising Manager 

Tel. CO 6-1492, or write : 

Symphony Hall, Boston 15, Mass. 



BOUND VOLUMES 0/ the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Concert Bulletins 

Containing 
analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Gilman in the 
N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.00 per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



[16] 



1948-1949 

BROOKLYN COMMITTEE 



FOR 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra Concerts 



Mr. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Chairman 



Mrs. H. Haughton Bell 
Executive Chairman 



Mrs. Edward C. Blum 
Vice -Chair man 

Mrs. ^Villiam G. James 
Chairman Membership 

Dr. Joseph Dana Allen 
>frs. Ernest Ash 
Hon. William R. Bayes 
Miss Dorothy Betts 
^frs. George M. Billings 
Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert E. Blum 
Mrs. Bruce Bromley 
Mrs. Samuel T. Brown 
Mrs. Walter Bruchhausen 
Mrs. Irving L. Cabot 
Mrs. Otis Swan Carroll 
>f rs. Oliver G. Carter 
Mrs. Thomas F. Casey 
Mrs. Francis T. Christy 
Mrs. Ellwood Colahan 
Mrs. Gordon Weir Col ton 
Mrs. Russell V. Cruikshank 
Mrs. Sidney W. Davidson 
Mrs. Mary C. Draper 
Mrs. Remick C. Eckhardt 
Mrs. Merrill N. Foote 
Mrs. Lewis W. Francis 
Mr. and 

Mrs. George H. Gartlan 
Mrs. Edwin L. Garvin 
Mrs. Charles R. Gay 
Mrs. Silas M. R. Giddings 
Mr. Andrew L. Gomory 
Mrs. AVilliam B. Greenman 



Mrs. William H. Good 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Carroll J. Dickson 

V ice-Chairman 

Mrs. AVilliam P. Hamilton 
Mr. and 

Mrs. Walter Hammitt 
Mr. Frank R. Hancock 
Mrs. James M. Hills 
Miss Elsie Hincken 
Mr. William T. Hunter 
Mrs. Ir\ ing G. Idler 
Mrs. George H. Her 
Mrs. Raymond V. Ingersoll 
Mrs. Henry A. Ingraham 
Mrs. Robert F. Ives 
Mrs. Charles Jaffa 
Mrs. Hans V. Kaltenborn 
Mrs. Miles Kastendieck 
Mrs. Maxwell Lester 
Mrs. Edith Lincoln 
Miss Jessie Lockitt 
Mrs. AVilliam H. Lohman 
Mrs. Frederick D. MacKay 
Mrs. Thomas H. McClintock 
Mrs. Edwin P. Maynard, Jr. 
Miss Charlotte Morgan 
Mrs. Leonard P. Moore 
Miss Emma Jessie Ogg 
Mrs. Dean C. Osborne 
Mrs. William M. Parke 
Mrs. William B. Parker 
Mrs. Frank H. Parsons 
Mrs. William P. Pashley 



Mrs. Henry J. Davenport 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Luella Wilson \'aile 
Chairman Boxes 

Mrs. Charles E. Perkins 
Mr. Charles Pratt 
Mrs. Benjamin Prince 
Mr. G. William Rasch 
Miss Agnes Ritchie 
Mrs. Charles E. Rogers 
Mrs. Frederick H. Rohlfs 
Mrs. Donald Ross 
Mrs. Rupert A. Root 
Mrs. Irving J. Sands 
Mrs. F. R. Schepmoes 
Mrs. Robert W. Shearman 
Mrs. Frank E. Simmons 
Mrs. E. A. Sunde 
Mrs. Ernest K. Tanner 
Mrs. Hollis K. Thayer 
Mr. Carl H. Tollefsen 
Mrs. Walter Truslow 
Mrs. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Mrs. Peter V. D. \'oorhees 
Mrs. Clarence Waterman 
Mrs. Morris W^atkins 
Mrs. Walter F. Watton 
Mrs. Walter F. Wells 
Mrs, George N. Whittlesey 
Mrs. William H. Whitton 
Hon. George A. Wingate 
Mrs. Maude B. Wood 
Miss Elizabeth Wright 




i^iW 



lal^ttJin 



The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — 'Mt is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIN PIASO COHPANV 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin alio builds ACROSON/C, HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 






BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948-1949 

Academy of Music, Brooklyn 

Under the auspices of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Soences 
and the Philharmonic SoaETY of Brooklyn 



1948-1949 

BROOKLYN COMMITTEE 



FOR 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra Concerts 



Mr. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Chairman 



Mrs. H. Haiighton Bell 
Executive Chairman 



Mrs. Edward C. Blum 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. William G. James 
Chairman Membership 

Dr. Joseph Dana Allen 

Mrs. Ernest Ash 

Mrs. Charles L. Babcock, Jr. 

Hon. William R. Bayes 

Miss Dorothy Betts 

Mrs. Georo^e M. Billins:s 

Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert E. Blum 
Mrs. Bruce Bromley 
Mrs. Samuel T. Brown 
Mrs. Walter Bruchhausen 
Mrs. Irving L. Cabot 
Mrs. Otis Swan Carroll 
Mrs. Oliver G. Carter 
Mrs. Francis T. Christy 
Mrs. Ellwood Colahan 
Mrs. Gordon Weir Colton 
Mrs. Russell V. Cruikshank 
Mrs. Sidney W. Davidson 
Mrs. Burton Delmhorst 
Mrs. Mary C. Draper 
Mrs. Eugene S. Dufficld 
Mrs. Remick C. Eckhardt 
Mrs. Merrill N. Foote 
Mrs. Lewis W. Francis 
Mr. and 

Mrs. George H. Gartlan 
Mrs. Edwin L. Garvin 
Mrs. Charles R. Gay 
Mrs. Silas M. R. Giddings 
Mr, Andrew L. Gomory 
Mrs. William B. Greenman 



Mrs. William H. Good 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Carroll J. Dickson 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Arthur Hallan 

Mrs. William P. Hamilton 

Mr. and 

Mrs. Walter Hammitt 
Mr. Frank R. Hancock 
Mrs. James M. Hills 
Mr. William T. Hunter 
Mrs. Irving G. Idler 
Mrs. George H. Her 
Mrs. Raymond V. IngersoU 
Mrs. Henry A. Ingraham 
Mrs. Robert F. Ives 
Mrs. Charles Jaffa 
Mrs. Miles Kastendieck 
Mrs. Warner King 
Mrs. Maxwell Lester 
Mrs. Edith Lincoln 
Miss Jessie Lockitt 
Mrs. William H. Lohman 
Mrs. Frederick D. MacKay 
Mrs. Thomas H. McClintock 
Mrs. Edwin P. Maynard, Jr. 
Mrs. Leonard P. Moore 
Miss Emma Jessie Ogg 
Mrs. Dean C. Osborne 
Mrs. William M. Parke 
Mrs. William B. Parker 
Mrs. Frank H. Parsons 
Mrs. William P. Pashley 
Mrs. Charles E. Perkins 
Mr. Charles Pratt 
Mrs. Stewart M. Pratt 



Mrs. Henry J. Davenport 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Luella ^Vilson Vaile 
Chairman Boxes 

Mrs. Benjamin Prince 
Mr. G. William Rasch 
Mrs. Valentine K. Raymond 
Miss Agnes Ritchie 
Mrs. Charles E. Rogers 
Mrs. Frederick H. Rohlfs 
Mrs. Rupert A. Root 
Mrs. Donald Ross 
Mrs. Irving J. Sands 
Mrs. F. R. Schepmoes 
Mrs. Robert W. Shearman 
Mrs. Frank E. Simmons 
Mrs. Donald G. C. Sinclair 
Mrs. Ainsworth L. Smith 
Miss Arietta H. Smith 
Mrs. E. A. Sunde 
Mrs. Ernest K. Tanner 
Mrs. Hollis K. Thayer 
Mr. Carl H. ToUefsen 
Mrs. Walter Truslow 
Mrs. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Mrs. Peter V. D. Voorhees 
Mrs. Clarence Waterman 
Mrs. Morris Watkins 
Mrs. Walter F. Watton 
Mrs. Walter F. Wells 
Mrs. George N. Whittlesey 
Mrs. William H. Whitton 
Hon. George A. Wingate 
Mrs. Maude B. Wood 
Miss Elizabeth Wright 






i9^4\\Ci949 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Third Concert 

FRIDAY EVENING, February 18 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W^ Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



[1] 



ANNUAL MEETING 
of the 

Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 

It is a pleasure to announce that invitations 
to attend the Annual Meeting of the Friends of the 
Orchestra will be extended this year to all who con- 
tribute to the Serge Koussevitzky Fund of the Or- 
chestra before February 26, ip^p. The meeting will 
be held at Symphony Hall on Wednesday, March 
2nd, at four o'clock. By that time it is confidently 
hoped that the Fund, which, after three months, 
now stands at $130,000, will exceed $200,000. Such 
a showing would indeed amount to tangible evi- 
dence to Dr. Koussevitzky at the meeting of our 
devotion to him and our determination to stand 
steadfastly behind the Orchestra. 

A special program has been arranged by 
Dr. Koussevitzky to follow the meeting, and at 
the conclusion of the music the Trustees and 
Dr. Koussevitzky will receive our members at tea 
in the upper foyer. 

Your generous support before February 26 
this year, either by gift or pledge, would be of 
tremendous help. 

Edward A. Taft 

Chairman, Anniversary Fund 

Gifts to the Anniversary Fund will constitute enroll- 
ment in the Society for the current season. Checks 
may he drawn payable to Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra and may be mailed to Fund Headquarters at 
Symphony Hall, Boston i^. Such gifts are tax de- 
ductible. 



t«] 



CHANGE OF PROGRAM BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 



Instead of the Concerto for Piano and Wind Orchestra, the following will be played: 

Capriccio for Piano and Orchestra •• - - - • - - - Stravinsky 

1» Presto ] 

2, Andante rapsodico ] (played without pause) 

3. Allegro capriccioso, ma tempo giusto ] 



BROOKLYN ACADEMY OF MUSIC FRIDAY EVENING, FEBRUARY 18, 1949 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



THIRD CONCERT 

FRIDAY EVENING, February i8, at 8:30 o'clock 



Stravinsky . 



Program 

IGOR STRAVINSKY Conductino^ 

Ode in Three Parts, for Orchestra 

Eulog\' 
Eclogue 
Epitaph 

Concerto for Piano and Wind Orchestra (with Double- 
Basses) 

I. Lento; Allegro; Lento 
II. Larghissimo 
III. Finale: Allegro 

INTERMISSION 

Concerto in D for String Orchestra 

I. Vivace 
II. Arioso: Andantino 
III. Rondo: Allegro 

Orpheus, Ballet in Three Scenes 

Orpheus weeps for Eurydice — Dance air — Dance of 
the Angel of Death — Interlude; Second Scene — Dance 
of the Furies — Dance Air (Orpheus) — "Pas d'Action" 
— "Pas-de-deux" — "Pas d'Action"; Third Scene — 
AfKDtheosis of Orpheus 



SOLOIST 

SOULIMA STRAVINSKY 



VICTOR RECORDS 



BALDWIN PIANO 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Network (Station WNBC) Monday, 11:30-12:00 P.M. 



Si 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

FIdelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1.25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1.00 

Fidelitone Flooting Point 50c 

I CKIVIU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY BASS 
RECORDS 

Among the many reviews of the new 
album of double bass recordings by 
Serge Koussevitzky, the following are 
quoted: 

Claudia Cassidy (in the Chicago 
Tribune) : 

"Collectors in search of Serge Kous- 
sevitzky's double bass recordings are 
being rescued by a series of circum- 
stances. Perhaps you remember that 
when Boston asked its renowned con- 
ductor what he wanted in token of ad- 
miration and affection in the 25th and 
farewell season, he said he wanted ''a 
big gift" for his orchestra. That gift 
was a backlog of financial security, and 
the fast growing Serge Koussevitzky 
Anniversary fund is the result. To 
augment it, a limited edition of 1,000 
albums of Koussevitzky recordings has 
been made available by the Boston or- 
chestra in cooperation with RCA Victor. 
Each is autographed, holds the portrait 
of the player with his instrument now 
hanging in Koussevitzky's Tanglewood 
home, and features three 12-inch, ruby 
vinylite records of the ^low movement 
from Koussevitzky's double bass con- 
certo, his Chanson Triste and Valse 
Miniature, and his arrangement of a 
largo by Eccles, plus a lullaby by Laska. 
The recordings were made in 1929, and 
you have to hear what they can do with 
the double bass to believe it. Pierre 
Luboshutz is the accompanist. The price 
is $10, including mailing costs. Address 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Sym- 
phony Hall, Boston 15." 

Jay C. Rosenfeld (in the Berkshire 
Eagle) : 

"Immediately discernible are the at- 
tributes which make orchestral music 
under his direction so absorbing; a 
magnificent conception of line, a con- 
tinuously glowing tone and the peerless 
faculty of maintaining and re-instilling 
vigorous urgency in the music. Except 
for a propensity to make his shifts and 
slides very noticeable, the mechanics 
of the playing are formidable. His in- 
tonation has the character associated 
with Casals and Heifetz, the tone has 
a vivid warmth and the bowing the un- 
canny amplitude of those masters who 
know the secret of preserving intensity 
without expending all their resources. 



[41 



"ODE," IN Three Parts for Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, June 17, 1882 



The Ode was composed for the Koussevitzky Music Foundation, Inc., and is dedi- 
cated to the memory of Mme. Natalie Koussevitzky. It was first performed by the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, October 8, 1943. 

It is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
four horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. 

THE coniposer has provided this explanation: "I was asked by the 
Koussevitzky Music Foundation to compose a symphonic piece 
which I have called 'Ode.' The Ode is a chant in three parts for 
orchestra. It is an appreciation of Natalie Koussevitzky 's spiritual con- 
tribution to the art of the eminent conductor, her husband. Dr. Serge 
Koussevitzky. 

'Tart I. 'Eulogy,' praise, a song in sustained melody with accom- 
paniment, the whole in fugal treatment. 

"Part II. 'Eclogue,' a piece in lively mood, a kind of concert 
champetre, suggesting out-of-door music, an idea cherisked by Nat- 
alie Koussevitzky and brilliantly materialized at Tanglewood by her 
husband. 

"Part III. 'Epitaph,' an inscription, serein air, closes this memorial 
triptych." 

[copyrighted] 



CONCERTO FOR PIANO AND WIND ORCHESTRA (with 
Double Basses and Timpani) 

By Igor Stravinsky 
Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, on June 17, 1882 



Composed in 1923-1924, this concerto had its first performance at a Concert 
Koussevitzky in Paris on May 22 of the latter year, the composer taking the piano 
part. Its first performance in this country was given by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra, January 23, 1925, again with Serge Koussevitzky as conductor and the com- 
poser as pianist. The accompaniment is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes 
and English horn, two clarinets, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, four 
trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, and double basses. The score is 
dedicated to Natalie Koussevitzky. 

STRAVINSKY tclls US in his Autobiography how he composed his first 
work in the concerto form in the period of the Wind Octet, when 
the possibilities of wind color unmixed were absorbing his attention. 
He finished the score at Biarritz in April and Koussevitzky, on seeing 
it, urged him to undertake the solo part. "I hesitated at first," he 
writes, "fearing that I should not have time to perfect my technique 
as a pianist, to practice enough, and to acquire the endurance neces- 

[5] 



sary to execute a work demanding sustained effort; but as I am by 
nature always tempted by anything needing prolonged effort, and 
prone to persist in overcoming difficulties, and as also the prospect of 
creating my work for myself and thus establishing the manner in 
which I wished it to be played, greatly attracted me, these influences 
combined to induce me to undertake it." 

After limbering his fingers on Czerny exercises, the composer ap- 
proached the date of performance more than tolerably equipped, 
but not without stage fright, not having adjusted himself to the neces- 
sity of keeping alert to his cues while his attention tended to drift 
to what was happening "in various parts of the orchestra. ... I re- 
member at my debut being seized by just such a lapse of memory, 
though it fortunately had no dire results. Having finished the first 
part of my concerto, just before beginning the Largo which opens 
with a piano solo, I suddenly realized that I had entirely forgotten 
how it started. I whispered this to Koussevitzky. He glanced at the 
score and whispered the first notes. That was enough to restore my 
balance and enable me to attack the Largo." Stravinsky presently over- 
came his fears. He reserved the concerto for his own performance 
and played it in many a city under many a notable conductor, pre- 
sumably without mishap, as often as forty times, a number which 
he proudly records in his book. 

The composer has described his Concerto as "a sort of passacaglia 
or toccata. It is quite in the style of the 17th century — that is the 
17th century viewed from the standpoint of today." It v^^as his first 
essay in the concertante manner, a style which he has since much 
cultivated. At the time he stoutly defended his aesthetic plan of using 
the orchestre d'harmonie, or wind orchestra, with the piano, "as an 
instrumental body more appropriate to the tone of the piano." As is 
well known, he did not adhere to this principle, having since shown 
no reluctance in combining the piano with strings. Stravinsky's crea- 
tive career has been an unceasing adventure in tonal possibilities and 
tonal combinations. 

The following analysis appeared in the program book of the Paris 
concert when the concerto was first performed. 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

CONCERT BY CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA 
Malcolm H. Holmes, Conductor 

' and 

CONSERVATORY CHORUS 

LoRNA Cooke deVaron, Conductor 

BRUCKNER MASS IN E minor 

Jordan Hall, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, February 16 and 17 

at 8:15 p.m. 
Tickets for reserved floor seats free at Jordan Hall Box Office. 



[6] 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




TJi* EMPLOYERS' Liability Axumtux Corpenxiem Ltd. 
The EMPLOYEES' /Ve ImturcMCm Company 
AMESXCAN EMPLOYEBS' /waraae* Compamy 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . meiny, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces £ind smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 



7C/i 





Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 



THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[7] 








Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they c 
you a wealth of their greatest performances k 
encore after encore! Among them: 

• Egmont Overture, Op. 84 — Beethoven. The Bostor^ ^"^ 
phony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. 12-0288, '- 

• Symphony No. 4, in A, Op. 90 ("Italian")— MendelssoU 
The Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Cfl* 
RCA Victor Album DM-1259, $4.75. 



THE WORLDliii 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs through 
the "Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor "Crestwood"! Hear 

your treasured recordings brilliantly reproduced! De luxe automatic record 
changer with "^Silent Sapphire" permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short- 
wave radio. AC Victrola 8V151. "Victrola"— T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 

I 81 





IGOR STRAVINSKY 



• Divertimento — Stravinsky. Igor Stravinsky conducting the 
RCA Victor Symphony Orchestra. Album DM-1202, $4.75. 

• Danses Concertantes — Stravinsky. Included as final side: 
Scherzo a la Russe — Stravinsky. Igor Stravinsky conducting 
the RCA Victor Chamber Orchestra and the RCA Victor Sym- 
phony Orchestra. Album DM-1234, $4.75. 

All pfices ore suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclu- 
»«»• of locol foxes. Price of single record does not include Federal 
MCije tax. ("DM" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 
»«tro.) 

ATEST ARTISTS ARE fWI i 



^l) 



THE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



[9] 



The Concerto is in three movements; and these movements are 
themselves divided as follows: The first movement consists of (a) 
Lento; (b) Allegro; (c) Maestoso. The second movement, after the 
opening Largo, introduces a cadenza (Poco riibato) , which is linked 
with a melodic section, followed by a second melody, the last two 
being stated in a very compact manner. The cadenza then returns, and 
the movement ends with a variant of the Largo passage at the begin- 
ning of the movement, which in this place represents rather a con- 
tinuation of the cadenza. 

The concluding measure of the second movement serves also as 
the subject of the Fugato with which the Finale begins (Allegro, 2-4) . 
The subject, assuming several forms, is heard sometimes in the piano 
part, sometimes in the orchestra, in a slower movement (doubled) , 
although the time-value of the metronomic base does not vary. A 
short melodic episode follows, giving place to another, in imitation. 
This is succeeded by a brief, rhythmic period (tutti) , with a counter- 
point for the piano, ending in a kind of Stretto. This last is brusquely 
interrupted by a reminiscence (Lento, 2-4) of the slow movement and, 
further on, of the music with which the Concerto began. A pause 
separates this return of the opening martial movement from the eight 
measures which conclude the Concerto — a stringendo passage (forte, 
marcatissimo) for the piano, over a syncopated accompaniment in the 
orchestra. 

[copyrighted] 



SOULIMA STRAVINSKY 



SouLiMA Stravinsky was born at Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1910, the 
year The Fire Bird was composed. He has been the pupil of Isidor 
Philipp and Nadia Boulanger. He made his debut as a pianist at the 
age of twenty in a concert tour of France and Switzerland. In 1934 he 
appeared in Paris, playing both the Concerto with Wind Instruments, 
and the Capriccio of Stravinsky, while his father conducted. Touring 
with his father, he has also played with him in the Concerto for Two 
Pianofortes. He gave a recital in Los Angeles last September. 



CONST ANTIN HOUNTASIS 



MAKER AND RKHAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 
240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



[10] 



CONCERTO IN D for String Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaura, near St. Petersburg, June 17, 1882 



The score is signed "Hollywood, August 8, 1946," and was first performed by 
Paul Sacher* and the Chamber Orchestra of Basel, January 21, 1947. It is dedi- 
cated to this orchestra and its leader. The piece was introduced in this country 
by Fritz Reiner, conducting the Pittsburgh Orchestra, January- 16, 1948. It has 
been performed in San Francisco and Mexico City under the composer's direction, 
and by the New York Philharmonic Symphony Society under the direction of 
Leopold Stokowski. 

STRAVINSKY, wTiting to Sachcr and attempting to describe the music, 
was at a loss to provide helpful verbal information about what 
may easily be perceived in the music itself. Neverthless, it can be 
pointed out that in the first movement, a Vivace in 6/8 rhythm, the 
strings are divided in the development. The solo viola and violin are 
set against the orchestral body. This movement is the longest. The 
second, an arioso andantino, 4/4, consists of only forty-three bars. 
The final rondo allegro continues in the concerto grosso style upon 
which the whole work is based. 

Remarks about the Concerto by Charles Stuart (in Tempo, sum- 
mer, 1948) are a retort to critical reviews which the piece encountered 
in London: 

"The salient quality of the Concerto in D is its unity in variety, 
the way in which its disparate bits and pieces key into each other, 
forming a valid whole. It is true that Stravinsky picks up one musical 
idea, puts it down and picks up another. This practice has been 
cited recently as a proof of his musical impotence. It happens to be 
the practice also of Bach, Mozart and the Irreproachables generally. It 
happens to be the way in which all good music is written. 

" 'But,' objects the critic, 'the successive or alternating ideas of 
Bach and Mozart fit together and make a pattern. Those of Stravin- 
sky don't.' 

"To people with a deaf spot for Stravinsky's harmonic and rhythmic 
idioms, every page the man wTites must of necessity be meaningless. 
It is the deaf spot that is to blame, not Stravinsky. Let me say in 
passing that nothing gives a musician more pride and pleasure than 
his deaf spots. He cultivates them anxiously. He is virtuous about 
them. They are his solace and cherished asset. It is so elating to be 
dogmatic and damnatory about music you never really hear and can 
never hope to understand. 



* Works composed for Paul Sacher and his orchestra include Arthur Honegger's Symphony 
for Strings, Martinu's Toccata and Two Canzone, Strauss's Metamorphoseon, Martin's 
Petite Symphonie Concertante, of which all but the second have been performed at Boston 
Symphony concerts. 



"But for some of us, whose ears in this matter are unspotted and 
whole, the Stravinsky idiom, his bar-to-bar texture, the 'feel' of his 
orchestration, the tension and tang of his part- writing, are matters 
of beauty in their own right. And to our way of thinking the musical 
ideas in the average Stravinsky piece are logically sequent and 
cohesive. 

"Which brings me back to the Concerto in D. The scudding, busy 
finale (a Rondo in name though not conspicuously by nature) is 
a cogent reply to the opening Vivace, a quick movement of quite 
different cut and purport; and the elegant middle movement (Arioso) 
replies with equal cogency to both. The Vivace is structurally the 
most complex movement of the three. No doubt the Deaf Spots are 
bewildered here by the moderato middle section. From the chatter and 
flow of innocent 6/8 triplets we plunge into a shadowed half-world 
of syncopation, the harmonies tart yet not without perfume. This 
episode is not only exciting in its own terms: it is also complementary, 
a signal proof of precisely that architectonic faculty which Stravinsky 
has been declared to lack." 

[copyrighted] 



(^^^^ 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 
846 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of sinsrinsT by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 

25 Blagden Street, Boston, Mass. 

[12] 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evening July 16 

Sunday afternoon July 17 

Saturday evening July 23 

Sunday afternoon July 24 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28 

Saturday evening July 30 ^ 

Sunday afternoon .July 31. 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening . .• August 11 

Saturday evening August 13' 

Sunday afternoon August 14' 



Extra concerts 
(Bach-Mozart- 
Haydn- 
Schubert) 



SERIES A 



SERIES B 



SERIES C 



For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood; apply at the sub- 
scription office in Symphony Hall. 



[15I 



ORPHEUS, BALLET IN THREE SCENES 
Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, on June 17, 1882 



The score of this ballet bears the signature at the end "Hollywood, September 23, 
1947-" It was introduced by the Ballet Society at the New York City Center, April 
28, 1948. The choreography was by George Balanchine, the decor by Isamu Noguchi, 
The part of Orpheus was danced by Nicholas Magallanes, Euridice by Maria 
Tallchief. 

The orchestra called for includes: two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English 
horn, two clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, 
timpani, harp and strings. 

The music, which includes the entire ballet, is here presented for the first time 
as a concert number. 

THE indications on the score are as follows: First scene: Orpheus 
weeps for Euridice. He stands motionless with his back to the 
audience. Friends pass bringing presents and offer him sympathy. — 
Air de Danse (Andante con moto). — Dance of the Angel of Death. 

— Interlude (The angel and Orpheus reappear in the gloom of 
Tartarus) . 

Second scene: Pas des Furies (their agitation and their threats) — 
Air de Danse (Orpheus) — Interlude (The tormented souls in Tar- 
tarus stretch out their fettered arms towards Orpheus, and implore 
him to continue his song of consolation.) — Air de Danse (Orpheus 

— Grave) — Pas d' Action (Andantino leggiadrb — Hades, moved by 
the song of Orpheus, grows calm. The Furies surround him, bind his 
eyes, and return Euridice to him.) — Pas de deux (Andante sostenuto 

— Orpheus and Euridice before the veiled curtain) — Interlude 
(Veiled curtain, behind which the decor of the first scene is placed) ~ 

— Pas d' Action (Vivace — The Bacchantes attack Orpheus, seize him, 
and tear him to pieces) . 

Third scene: Apotheosis of Orpheus (Lento sostenuto) . Apollo 
appears. He wrests the lyre from Orpheus and raises his song heaven- 
wards. 

The following description of the ballet was contributed by Arthur 
V. Berger to Musical America: 

"The most striking aspect of Stravinsky's music for Orpheus is, 
perhaps, its repose, its tenderness. It is another masterpiece in the line 
of dramatic works that occupy a towering position among current 
musical achievements. For those of us who know Persephone, based 
on a similar subject, it is more or less what we should expect in 
grandeur and nobility from his treatment of the Orpheus legend. 
But since Persephone is so lamentably neglected, the peculiarly Gallic 
languor of the new score may come as a surprise, and even the more 
limited circle of admirers is aware of an extension of this quality in 
Orpheus. Apollon Musagete, too, which likewise comes to mind, is 
more sculptural by comparison. It is this quality of renewal that is 
among the things determining Stravinsky's position as the first creative 
musician of our time. 

r i4l 



"The restraint of Orpheus is underlined by its sparse orchestration. 
Only for a few measures is there a tutti — when the Bacchantes launch 
their final attack on Orpheus. The moment he falls, the orchestra 
subsides. The isolated tutti is as commanding a stroke as Mozart's 
introduction of the previously tacit trombones in the Statue Scene 
of Don Giovanni. Stravinsky's chord for this tutti — A minor with an 
acidulous G-sharp in the bass — is one of those inspirational twists 
(like the opening chord of the Symphonie de Psaumes) he often gives 
traditional harmonies through well separated notes over an enormous 
pitch range. 

"The Bacchantes scene is the only one confining itself to the more 
typically Stravinskyan, peremptory, interrupted rhythms. Otherwise, 
there is almost continuous, beautifully flowing melodic line. There 
are even tunes for those who must have them to hum as they leave 
the- hall. One in particular, in the way it is underscored, easily serves 
this end. By the same token it fills a strategic dramatic function by 
serving as the strain through which Orpheus moves the Furies. In F 
minor, conventionally modulating to subdominant, it has ornaments 
that inevitably, in the present dramatic context, have suggested Gluck. 
But I think it has Baroque evocations too, and later in the English 
horn, canonically answering the harp, it even suggests Tchaikovsky. 
Precisely its universality as melody, as a sounding-board for the lyricism 
of all time, makes it at once easily accessible to a listener and an in- 
genious symbol for Orpheus, who is, after all, in antiqiie mytholog%% 
music's epitome. 

"Whereas in Apollo and Persephone the complexity of the melodic 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FOURTH CONCERT 

Friday Evenings March l8 



[15] 



lines themselves often establishes a uniqueness that is not always 
present in this score, here the complexity is provided by the way in 
which the melodies are among many strands woven contrapuntally — 
intertwining and disentangling in the way that Balanchine's dancers 
do. 

"The contrapuntal voices, at times canonic and even fugal, would 
often clash bitterly if it were not for the astonishing, softening effect 
of the instrumentation, which gives different timbre to each of two 
clashing tones. As in the case of the orchestral tutti that determines 
the one climax, here again it is suggested that orchestral coloring may 
actually be an organic dimension. The instrument seems to have been 
selected first in each instance, and only subsequently the tones through 
which it is deployed. 

"A counterpoint of two instruments is a recurrent device: two 
bassoons in the middle of the vernal scene of the first tableau; two 
oboes for the pleading theme of Orpheus among the Furies; two horns 
for the Apotheosis in fugal entrances of a motive which, representing 
the union of Orpheus and Euridice in death, appropriately refers to 
their earlier Pas de Deux. The prominence of the harp, which also 
fascinated Stravinsky in the Symphony in Three Movements, need, of 
course, not be accounted for in a score for Orpheus. The impressionistic 
arpeggiated strumming the harp usually brings in its wake when other 
composers score for it gives way here to exquisitely precise lines that 
take part in the counterpoint." 

[copyrighted] 



• THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 

CONCERT BULLETIN 

• THE BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 

PROGRAM 

• THE BOSTON POPS PROGRAM 

(TVsJ) 

The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra 

PUBLICATIONS 

Offer to advertisers, at moderate rates, 
coverage of extensive, discerning audi- 
ences. All spaces are in eye-catching 
positions near the descriptive notes, 
which are widely read. 



Total Circulation More Than 500,000 



For Information and Rates Call 

Mrs. Dana Somes, Advertising Manager 

Tel. CO 6-1492, or write : 

Symphony Hall, Boston 15. Mass. 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Gilman in the 
N. Y. Herald a7id Tribune 

Price I6.00 per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



i6 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 

PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap^ 

Georges Fourel 
Ell gen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 
Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra -Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 



George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Maves 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 

Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 

George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Horns 
Willem Valkeniei 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConath\ 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 

Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansottc 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stemburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 




The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — "It is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 



THE BALDWIN VUM mm\ 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin al$o builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and the BAU)WIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 











' BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



)N. 



m 



^^?. 



H 



^" 



A 



.X 



l*^ 



^ — 




SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
1948- 1949 

Academy of Music, Brooklyn 

Under the auspices of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Soences 
and the Philharmonic SoazTY of Brooklyn 



1948-1949 

BROOKLYN COMMITTEE 



FOR 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra Concerts 



Mr. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Chairman 



Mrs. H. Haughton Bell 
Executive Chairman 



Mrs. Edward C. Blum 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. William G. James 
Chairman Membership 

Dr. Joseph Dana Allen 

Mrs, Ernest Ash 

Mrs. Charles L. Babcock, Jr. 

Hon. William R. Bayes 

Miss Dorothy Betts 

Mrs. George M. Billings 

Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert E. Blum 
Mrs. Bruce Bromley 
Mrs. Samuel T. Brown 
Mrs. Walter Bruchhausen 
Mrs. Irving L. Cabot 
Mrs. Otis Swan Carroll 
Mrs. Oliver G. Carter 
Mrs. Francis T. Christy 
Mrs. Ellwood Colahan 
Mrs. Gordon Weir Col ton 
Mrs. Russell V. Cruikshank 
Mrs. Sidney W. Davidson 
Mrs. Burton Delmhorst 
Mrs. Mary C. Draper 
Mrs. Eugene S. Duffield 
Mrs. Remick C. Eckhardt 
Mrs. Merrill N. Foote 
Mrs. Lewis W. Francis 
Mr. and 

Mrs. George H. Gartlan 
Mrs. Edwin L. Garvin 
Mrs. Charles R. Gay 
Mrs. Silas M. R, Giddings 
Mr. Andrew L. Gomory 
Mrs. William B. Greenman 



Mrs. William H. Good 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Carroll J. Dickson 
V ice-Chairman 

Mrs. Arthur Hallan 

Mrs. William P. Hamilton 

Mr. and 

Mrs. Walter Hammitt 
Mr. Frank R. Hancock 
Mrs. James M. Hills 
Mr. William T. Hunter 
Mrs. Irving G. Idler 
Mrs. George H. Her 
Mrs. Raymond V. Ingersoll 
Mrs. Henry A. Ingraham 
Mrs. Robert F. Ives 
Mrs. Charles Jaffa 
Mrs. Miles Kastendieck 
Mrs. Warner King 
Mrs. Maxwell Lester 
Mrs. Edith Lincoln 
Miss Jessie Lockitt 
Mrs. William H. Lohman 
Mrs. Frederick D. MacKay 
Mrs. Thomas H. McClintock 
Mrs. Edwin P. Maynard, Jr. 
Mrs. Leonard P. Moore 
Miss Emma Jessie Ogg 
Mrs. Dean C. Osborne 
Mrs. William M. Parke 
Mrs. William B. Parker 
Mrs. Frank H. Parsons 
Mrs. William P. Pashley 
Mrs. Charles E. Perkins 
Mr. Charles Pratt 
Mrs. Stewart M. Pratt 



Mrs. Henry J. Davenport 
V ice-Chairman 

Mrs. Luella Wilson Vaile 
Chairman Boxes 

Mrs. Benjamin Prince 
Mr. G. William Rasch 
Mrs. Valentine K. Raymond 
Miss Agnes Ritchie 
Mrs. Charles E. Rogers 
Mrs. Frederick H. Rohlfs 
Mrs. Rupert A. Root 
Mrs. Donald Ross 
Mrs. Irving J. Sands 
Mrs. F. R. Schepmoes 
Mrs. Robert W. Shearman 
Mrs. Frank E. Simmons 
Mrs. Donald G. C. Sinclair 
Mrs. Ainsworth L. Smith 
Miss Arietta H. Smith 
Mrs. E. A. Sunde 
Mrs. Ernest K. Tanner 
Mrs. Hollis K. Thayer 
Mr. Carl H. ToUefsen 
Mrs. Walter Truslow 
Mrs. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Mrs. Peter V. D. Voorhees 
Mrs. Clarence Waterman 
Mrs. Morris Watkins 
Mrs. Walter F. Watton 
Mrs. Walter F. Wells 
Mrs. George N. Whittlesey 
Mrs. William H. Whitton 
Hon. George A. Wingate 
Mrs. Maude B. Wood 
Miss Elizabeth Wright 






.^^^|^e^. 






19^4x^1949 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fourth Concert 

FRIDAY EVENING, March 18 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 

[I] 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
ANNIVERSARY FUND 

of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

The goal for this appeal, which will be the only 
appeal during this Anniversary Year, is $250,000 
net after all expenses of the Orchestra for the current 
yen r have been met. This sum is approximately four 
times as much as the amount contributed by the 
Friends of the Orchestra during the past season. 

All who care to join in honoring Dr. Koussevitzky 
on his twenty-fifth year of service in the only 
manner he wants are invited to enroll as Friends 
of the Orchestra and Contributors to the Serge 
Koussevitzky Fund. 

To enroll, simply send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston 75. ''Big" gifts and 
small will be gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 

Gifts received through March 1 total $142,050. 
Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 

FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Edward A. Taft, Chairman 

KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

All gifts to the Orchestra are tax deductible. 



l«] 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FOURTH CONCERT 

FRIDAY EVENING, March i8, at 8:30 o'clock 



Program 

RICHARD BURGIN Conducting 
Weber Overture to "Euryanthe" 

Brahms Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. go 

I. Allegro con brio 

II. Andante 

III. Poco allegretto 
IV. Allegro 

INTERMISSION 

Bruckner Adagio from the String Quintet 

RiMSKY-KoRSAKOv Suitc from the Opera, "The Fairy Tale 

of Tsar Saltan" (After Pushkin) 
I. Allegretto alia marcia 
II. Introduction to Act II 

IV. The Three Wonders (Introduction to last scene) 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Network (Station WNBC) Monday, 11:30-12:00 P.M. 



rsi 




AT YOUR DEALER'S — A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Pidellfone Waster 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1.25 

Fidelitone DeLuxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 

I CKlVlU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE BERKSHIRE MUSIC 
CENTER, 1949 

Dr. Koussevitzky announces plans for 
the 1949 session of the Berkshire Music 
Center at Tanglewood in Lenox, next 
summer. The school will have a six- 
week session from July 4th to August 
14th, through the period of the Berkshire 
Festival concerts (July 16th to August 
14th). 

Dr. Koussevitzky will direct the 
school with Aaron Copland as Assistant 
Director. Additions to the Faculty in- 
clude Olivier Messiaen, the Parisian 
composer, who will make his first visit 
to America to join Aaron Copland as 
teacher of composition. The members 
of the Juilliard String Quartet (Robert 
Mann, Robert Koff, Raphael Hillyer 
and Arthur Winograd) will assist Gregor 
Piatigorsk^', who will be in charge of 
Chamber Music. Twenty-five members 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra will 
also take part in this department. Among 
the faculty, together with the principals 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
will be Leonard Bernstein, Richard 
Burgin and Eleazar de Carvalho assist- 
ing Dr. Koussevitzky in the conducting 
classes and with the student orchestra. 
Hugh Ross will head the Choral De- 
partment. Robert Shaw, regularly a 
member of the Choral faculty, will be 
on leave of absence, and Mr. Ross will 
be joined by Christopher Honaas, head 
of the Music Department of Rollins 
College in Winter Park, Florida. 

There will be five departments as in 
former seasons: I Orchestral and Choral 
Conducting, II Orchestra and Chamber 
Music, III Composition, IV Opera and 
V Chorus. The Opera Department will 
include a considerably expanded Opera 
and Chamber Orchestra which will per- 
form for the opera productions and will 
give concerts from the chamber or- 
chestra repertory. There will be some 
40 school performances, including con- 
certs by all the departments, by mem- 
bers of the faculty, and visiting artists, 
and a major opera production under the 
direction of Boris Goldovsk\' in the tra- 
dition of Benjamin Britten's "Peter 
Grimes" (American premiere in 1946), 
Mozart's 'Idomeneo" (American pre- 
miere in 1947) and Rossini's "The Turk 
in Italy" (1948). Members of the 
Friends of the Berkshire Music Center, 
an organization of contributors to the 
support of the school, are invited to 
these concerts. 



r4i 



OVERTURE TO "EURYANTHE" 

By Carl Maria von Weber 

Born at Eutin, Oldenburg, December 18, 1786; died at London, June 5, 1826 



IT was in 1823 ^^^^^ Weber completed ''Eiiryanthe/' his "grand heroic- 
romantic" opera for Domenico Barbaja, manager of the Karnth- 
nerthor Theater at Vienna, who had a hopeful eye upon a success com- 
parable to that of "Der Freischiitz." There is every evidence that 
Weber was ambitious for his work and spared no pains with it. 
"Euryanthe" was his longest opera, lasting, as first performed, four 
hours. Unlike "Der Freischiltz," it had a continuous musical score 
with no interruptions of spoken dialogue. Weber completed the score 
without the Overture on August 29, 1823, ^^^ began at once to com- 
pose the Overture, which was not ready until October 19, six days 
before the first performance. On the day following the event, October 
26, the composer wrote to his wife: "My reception, when I appeared 
in the orchestra, was the most enthusiastic and brilliant that one could 
imagine. There was no end to it. At last I gave the signal for the 
beginning. Stillness of death. The Overture was applauded madly; 
there was a demand for a repetition; but I went ahead, so that the 
performance might not be too long drawn out." Yet the success was 
not unqualified; the printed reports were not all favorable. The li- 
bretto in particular was generally denounced as needlessly involved. 
The opera held the stage for hardly more than twenty performances 
in the season. There are degrees of success, and such was the case in 
Vienna in 1823. Schubert, whose ''Rosamunde/' to a text by the 
same librettist, Helmina von Chezy, was mounted on December 20 
of the same season had reason to envy "Euryanthe," for "Rosamunde" 
did not survive two performances. Beethoven, who was in Vienna and 
had a long and cordial meeting with Weber at the time, also envied 
him his undoubted instinct for the theater as evidenced in the score 
of "Der Freischiitz/' which he had studied with exclamations of 
wonderment. 

The overture, after an opening in the characteristic fiery Weberian 
manner, discloses a theme from Adolar's ''Ich hau' auf Gott und meine 
Euryanth' " (Act I) set forth by the wind choirs. The second theme 
(violins) is from Adolar's aria "Wehen mir liXfte Ruh' " (Act II) . 
After a pause of suspense, the composer introduces a largo of fifteen 
measures, pianissimo, for violins, muted and divided, with a tremolo 
in the violas. It is an eerie music intended to suggest the scene of the 
sepulchre. Weber proposed, but abandoned, the idea of having the 
curtain raised in the midst of the overture to reveal the following 

[5l 



tableau: "The interior of Emma's tomb. A kneeling statue of her is 

beside the coffin, which is surmounted by a twelfth-century baldacchino 

[canopy]. Euryanthe prays by the coffin, while the spirit of Emma 

hovers overhead. Eglantine looks on." In a fugato of the development, 

the first theme is inverted. The lyrical second theme brings the 

conclusion. 

r copyrighted] 



SYMPHONY NO. 3, IN F MAJOR, Op. 90 
By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg, May 7. 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, 1897 



Composed in 1883, the Third Symphony was first performed at a concert of the 
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, December 2, 1883, Hans Richter conducting. The 
first American performance was in New York, October 24, 1884, at a Novelty Con- 
cert by Mr. Van der Stucken, The first performance in Boston was by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, under Wilhelm Gericke, on November 8, 1884. 

The Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons 
and contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings, 

THE world which had waited so many years for Brahms' First Sym- 
phony was again aroused to a high state of expectancy when six 
years elapsed after the Second, before a Third was announced as 
written and ready for performance. It was in the summer of 1883, at 
Wiesbaden, that Brahms (just turned fifty) completed the symphony 
which had occupied him for a large part of the previous year. 
Brahms, attending the rehearsals for the first performance, in Vienna, 
expressed himself to Bulow as anxious for its success, and when 
after the performance xt was proclaimed in print as by far his best 
work, he was angry, fearing that the public would be led to expect 
too much of it, and would be disappointed. He need not have 
worried. Those who, while respecting the first two symphonies, had 
felt at liberty to weigh and argue them, were now completely con- 
vinced that a great symphonist dwelt among them; they were only 
eager to hear his new score, to probe the beauties which they knew 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 
Refresher courses in music education and theoretical subjects; courses in 
counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 
individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-September 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 



[6] 




The Treasurer's Report 
that Nobody Wanted to Hear 

It was bad news. Production was up. Sales were up. But 
profits took a nose dive. One item did it ... a hidden 
bombshell ... an embezzlement of several thousand dollars 
by a "faithjul" employee with the company for twenty years. 

This goes on all the time. Your company might be next. 
Let The Employers' Group Man with the Plan show you 
how easy and inexpensive it is to prevent such losses with 
our Dishonesty Protection Plan. 

THE EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

110 Milk St., Boston 7, Mass. 
The Employers' Group Man is The Man with the Plan 




[7] 




THE WORLD'S GREATESI'li 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs 
through the ^^Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor 
'Xrestwood"! Hear your treasured recordings brilliantly repro- 
duced! De luxe automatic record changer with "Silent Sapphire" 
permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short-wave radio. AC. Victrola 
8V151. "Victrola"—!. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



18] 




HAVE YOU HEARD 



I 



I 

^F Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you a wealth of his 
^ greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor — Beethoven. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor; with Frances Yeend; Eunice Alberts; 

David Lloyd; James Pease; and the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus under 
the direction of Robert Shaw. DM-1190, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor 'Red Seal' 
De Luxe Records), $17. 

• Francesco do Rimini, Op. 32— Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. Album DM-1179, $4.75. 

• Symphony No. 5, in B-Flot — Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-1215, $4.75. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclusive of local taxes. 
("DM" and "DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



TISTS ARE 



Otu 



l/felDf^fcfe 



dA 



"^ fCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOOhJS OVER NBC 

\9] 



would be there. The Vienna premiere was a real occasion. There was 
present what Kalbeck called the "Wagner-Bruckner ecclesia militans," 
whose valiant attempt at a hostile demonstration was quite ignored 
and lost in the general enthusiasm. For the second performance, which 
was to be in Berlin, Brahms made conflicting promises to Wiillner 
and Joachim. Joachim won the honor and Brahms repeated the new 
symphony, with Wiillner 's orchestra, three times in Berlin, in the 
month of January. Biilow at Meiningen would not be outdone, and 
put it twice upon the same programme. City after city approached 
Brahms for a performance, and even from France, which to this day 
has remained tepid to Brahms, there came an invitation from the 
Societe des Concerts modernes over the signature of Benjamin Godard. 
When the work was published in 1884 (at an initial fee to the com- 
poser of $9,000), it was performed far and wide. 

If the early success of the Third Symphony was in some part a 
succes d'estime, the music must also have made its way by its own 
sober virtues. Certainly Brahms never wrote a more unspectacular, 
personal symphony. In six years' pause, the composer seemed to have 
taken stock of himself. The romantic excesses which he had absorbed 
from Beethoven and Schumann, he toned down to a fine, even glow, 
which was far truer to the essential nature of this self-continent dreamer 
from the north country. The unveiled sentiment to which, under the 
shadow of Beethoven, he had been betrayed in the slow movement 
of his First Symphony, the open emotional proclamation of its final 
pages; the Schumannesque lyricism of the Second Symphony, its sunlit 
orchestration and clear, long-breathed diatonic melody, the festive 
trumpets of its Finale — these inherited musical traits were no longer 
suitable to the now fully matured symphonic Brahms. His brass hence- 
forth was to be, if not sombre, at least subdued; his emotionalism more 
tranquillized and innig; his erstwhile folklike themes subtilized into a 
more delicate and personal idiom. In other words, the expansive, 
sturdy, the militantly bourgeois Brahms, while outwardly unchanged, 
had inwardly been completely developed into a refined poet quite 
apart from his kind, an entire aristocrat of his art. 

"The peculiar, deep-toned luminosity" of the F major Symphony 
was the result, so it can be assumed, of that painstaking industry 

CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLEVS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[10] 



which was characteristic of Brahms, and there is circumstantial con- 
firmation in the manuscript score which is in the possession of Dr. 
Jerome Stonborough in Vienna. Karl Geiringer has examined the 
manuscript and his description of it is among the fund of valuable 
matter divulged in the writer's "Brahms: His Life and Work." 

"It shows a large number of small pencilled revisions in the orches- 
tration, which the master probably made during the rehearsals. Thus, 
for instance, the change of the clarinets in the first movement, from 
B-flat to A, was not originally planned; and for the second movement 
Brahms wanted to make use of trumpets and drums, but subsequently 
dispensed with these, as not conforming with the mood of the Andante. 
On the other hand, the bassoons, and the trumpets and drums of the 
Finale, were later additions. Such meticulous consideration of the 
slightest subtleties of orchestral colouring belies the thoughtlessly re- 
peated catchword that Brahms was not greatly interested in the prob- 
lems of instrumentation." 

[copyrighted] 



ADAGIO FROM THE STRING QUINTET 

By Anton Bruckner 

Born in Ansfeld, Upper Austria, September 4, 1824; died in Vienna, October 11, 1896 



Bruckner composed his Quintet for two violins, two violas, and 'cello in 1879 
(the Adagio was composed in March) . It was first performed from the manuscript 
at a private concert of the Akademische Wagner-Verein, by the Winkler Quartet, 
in Vienna, November 17, 1881. It was published in 1884, and the Hellmesberger 
Quartet performed it in Vienna, January 8, 1885. The dedication is to the Herzog 
Emanuel of Bavaria. 

UNLIKE Beethoven or Brahms, who wrote chamber music before they 
w^ere ready to venture upon the larger form of the symphony, 
Bruckner was fifty-four and at work upon his Sixth Symphony when, in 
1879, he tried his hand at a chamber work for the only time in his life. 
Joseph Hellmesberger (the elder) had long been after him for such a 
piece. His greatest admirers find symphonic thinking in the Quintet, 
and it is wdth no great conviction that they have tried to describe it as a 
successor to Beethoven's last quartets. Rudolf Louis in his book on 
Bruckner has written about this music: "Its relation to a symphony 
is that of a fresco painter's cartoon to the finished monumental picture." 
It is associated with the probing adagios of the last three symphonies. 
The first theme, with which the movement begins, is marked 
"ausdrucksvoll." The second theme, introduced by the first viola, is 
similar in character, in fact the opening suggests an inversion, and the 
two are closely integiated throughout the development. 

[copyrighted! 

r>ii 



MUSICAL PICTURES: SUITE FOR ORCHESTRA, from "The 
Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan/' Op. ^y 

By Nicholas Andreievitch Rimsky-Korsakov 

Born at Tikhvin, in the government ol Novgorod, March 18, 1844; died at 

St. Petersburg, June 21, 1908 



"The Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan, his Son the Renowned and Mighty Paladin, the 
Prince Guidon Saltanovich, and the Beautiful Tsarevna Lebed" (Swan) , an opera 
in four acts, was begun in 1899 ^"d completed January 31, 1900. The opera 
was produced at a private performance in Moscow in 1900. A suite of "musical 
pictures" was performed at St. Petersburg at a concert of the Imperial Russian 
Musical Society shortly afterwards. The first movement and finale of the suite were 
performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, April 20, 1923. The "Flight of the 
Bumble Bee," a scherzo from the second act which was not published with the 
suite, was performed at these concerts October 24, 1924. The full suite with the 
"Flight of the Bumble Bee" included was performed December 22, 1932, and again 
on February 19, 1936, in commemoration of the centenary of Pushkin's death 
(February 10, 1836) . 

The suite is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, three 
clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and double bassoon, four horns, three trum- 
pets, three trombones and bass tuba, timpani, side drum, bass drum, cymbals, tri- 
angle, small bells, xylophone, celesta, harp and strings. Each movement quotes lines 
from Pushkin's poem, and is opened with a trumpet fanfare. 

PUSHKIN turned with increasing interest in the course of his brief 
career to simple folk fairy tales as poetic subjects. "In them," 
according to the new biography of the poet by Ernest J. Simmons, 
"he is entirely the creator. The story ["Tsar Saltan"] is borrowed, 
as Shakespeare might borrow the plot of a play, but the finished 
product becomes an original work of beauty. Pushkin had learned 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

846 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singring by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by ^Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 

25 Blagden Street, Boston, Mass. 

[12] 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evening: July, i6\ ^ ^ 

JO J -f-^ \ Extra concerts 

Sunday afternoon July 17 [^ (Bach-Mozart- 
Saturday evening July 23 r ^s^^^ert) 

Sunday afternoon July 24J 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28 

Saturday evening July 30 /" SERIES A 

Sunday afternoon ]u\y 31 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 !> SERIES B 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening August 11 

Saturday evening August i3\ SERIES C 

Sunday afternoon August 14' 

For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, address Symphony 
Hall, Boston 15, Mass. 



[ '3 1 



to move easily and surely in this world of complete fantasy. The 
artlessness of the folk is never subordinated to the sophisticated rules 
of art. Meaning, or understanding, or logic, is not allowed to obtrude 
upon the natural laws of folk tale narration. The story moves on, as 
it were, by its own volition. And Pushkin's recognition of this in- 
herent artlessness and his complete acceptance of it serve to make these 
folk tales his most perfect creations." 

Rimsky-Korsakov was fascinated by Pushkin's verses in the folk 
tale style. The fantastic prologue to Pushkin's Russian and Lud- 
milla" became the subject of his early 'Tairy Tales," and in the latter 
part of his career Vladimir Bielsky expanded both the "Tsar Saltan" 
and "The Golden Cock" to the proportions of a libretto for Rimsky- 
Korsakov's purposes in composing an opera on each of the two fairy 
tales. 

Rimsky-Korsakov composed "Tsar Saltan" with enthusiasm. He tells 
us: "In the spring [1899], V. I. Bielsky began to write his splen- 
did libretto, making use of Pushkin as much as was possible, and 
artistically, as well as skillfully, imitating his style. He would hand 
me the scenes, one by one, as they were finished and I set to work on 
the opera. . . . The libretto came to me piecemeal continuously from 
Bielsky." The composer goes on to explain that in his vocal writing 
he carefully adapted to musical form the characteristic reiterated 



DOUBLE BASS RECORDS 

The Anniversary Album of Double 
Bass records by Serge Koussevitzky (pri- 
vate souvenir pressing) is now on sale at 
the Box Office. The proceeds (at $10 
each) will benefit the Koussevitzky 25th 
Anniversary Fund. 

Address mail orders to Symphony 1 all, Boston 15, 
Mass. ($10 includes shipping charge). 



[M] 



dialogue of the two wicked sisters, and the queen Barbarika, the sym- 
metry investing the piece with an intentionally fairy tale character. 
Instrumentally speaking, he made a fairly elaborate use of the system 
of leit-motives in this opera. He also explains how "out of the rather 
longish orchestral preludes to Acts I, II, and IV, I resolved to put 
together a suite under the title Xittle Pictures to the Fairy Tale of 
Tsar Saltan.' " 

The story tells of the handsome and fabulous Tsar Saltan who, 
going about his kingdom incognito, overhears three sisters discussing 
what each would do for the Tsar were she to be his bride. The first 
would bake him fine bread, the second would weave him fine linen, 
the third and youngest would bear him a beautiful heir to the throne. 
The Tsar at once chose the youngest, but made the mistake of allow- 
ing the envious and disappointed sisters to dwell in his palace. The 
Tsaritsa bore him a beautiful son during his absence at the wars, 
but the two sisters, together with the plotting Barbarika, sent 
the king a false message to the effect that the heir was indeed no 
human child, but a monstrous creature in whom nature had no match. 
The Tsar refused to believe this message, and sent word that he was 
returning to see for himself, but again the plotters changed his mes- 
sage to a sentence that the mother and child should be inclosed in a 
barrel and cast upon the sea. For days the two were at the mercy of 
the waves, until the cask was stranded upon a strange shore, the island 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FIFTH AND LAST CONCERT 

Friday Evenings April I^ 



[15] 



of Buyan. The boy grew daily in beauty and strength, and came to 
be called Prince Gvidon. He saved the life of a swan, which, in grati- 
tude, by its magic powers, endowed the island with three wonders. 
The first was a squirrel which whistled folk songs while nibbling nuts 
with golden shells, and extracting kernels of pure emerald. The sec- 
ond was a tempestuous sea which flooded the shore, bearing on its tide 
thirty-three warriors fully armed. The third was a princess as brilliant 
as the sun, whose tresses were illumined with moonbeams, and upon 
whose forehead burned a star. The Prince Gvidon, longing for his 
father, the Tsar, and wishing to entice him to the island, was trans- 
formed by the swan's power into a bumble-bee, and made his way to 
the Tsar's domain. When his mother's rivals, the baker, the weaver, 
and the Queen tried to distract the Tsar's attention by tales of these 
wonders elsewhere, the transformed prince flew into the face of the 
teller and spoiled their story. When the Queen attempted to describe 
the wondrous princess, Gvidon, as a bumble-bee, flew angrily at her. 

The Tsar at length sailed to the island of Buyan, and greeted his 
fair son and the princess, his bride, who was no other than the swan in 
transformed shape. 

[copyrighted] 



• THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 

CONCERT BULLETIN 

• THE BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 

PROGRAM 

• THE BOSTON POPS PROGRAM 

The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra 

PUBLICATIONS 

Coverage: Higher Income Groups 
Positions: All Conspicuous 
Rates: Moderate 



Total Circulation More Than 500,000 



For Information and Rates Call 

Mrs. Dana Somes, Advertising Manager 

Tel. CO 6-1492, or write : 

Symphony Hall, Boston 15, Mass. 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

malytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
[OHN N. BuRK, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Oilman in the 
N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.oo per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



[ >6] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 

PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap^ 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard " 
Emil Kornsand 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 
Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 

Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 
Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Llo\d Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Duftesne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra- Bassoon 
Boaz Filler 



George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 

Charles \'an Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 

Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon MarjoUet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Obofs 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 

Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 
£b Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Horns 

W'illem \'alkeniei 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter \f;icdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Martel L:i fosse 
Hanv Heiforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jato!) Rnichman 
I nrien Hansotte 
Jr)hn Coffey 
Josef Oiosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stemburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



mmzKY 




lali!ituin 



The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — ^1t is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIIII PliKO COMPAM 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 






BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1 948 -I 949 

Academy of Music, Brooklyn 

Under the auspices of the Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sctences 
and the Philharmonic Sooety of Brooklyn 



1948-1949 
BROOKLYN COMMITTEE 

FOR 



The Boston Symphony Orchestra Concerts 



Mr. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Chairman 



Mrs. H. Haughton Bell 
Executive Chairman 



Mrs. Edward C. Blum 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. William G. James 
Chairman Membership 

Dr. Joseph Dana Allen 

Mrs. Ernest Ash 

Mrs. Charles L. Babcock, Jr. 

Hon. William R. Bayes 

Miss Dorothy Betts 

Mrs. George M. Billings 

Mr. and 

Mrs. Robert E. Blum 
Mrs. Bruce Bromley 
Mrs. Samuel T. Brown 
Mrs. Walter Brucjihausen 
Mrs. Irving L. Cabot 
Mrs. Otis Swan Carroll 
Mrs. Oliver G. Carter 
Mrs. Francis T. Christy 
Mrs. Ellwood Colahan 
Mrs. Gordon Weir Colton 
Mrs. Russell V. Cruikshank 
Mrs. Sidney W. Davidson 
Mrs. Burton Delmhorsi 
Mrs. Mary C. Draper 
Mrs. Eugene S. Duffield 
Mrs. Remick C. Eckhardt 
Mrs. Merrill N. Foote 
Mrs. Lewis W. Francis 
Mr. and 

Mrs. George H. Gartlan 
Mrs. Edwin L. Garvin 
Mrs. Charles R. Gay 
Mrs. Silas M. R. Giddings 
Mr. Andrew L. Gomory 
Mrs. William B. Greenman 



Mrs. William H. Good 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Carroll J. Dickson 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Arthur Hallan 

Mrs. William P. Hamilton 

Mr. and 

Mrs. Walter Hammitt 
Mr. Frank R. Hancock 
Mrs. James M. Hills 
Mr. William T. Hunter 
Mrs. Irving G. Idler 
Mrs. George H. Her 
Mrs. Raymond V. Ingersoll 
Mrs. Henry A. Ingraham 
Mrs. Robert F. Ives 
Mrs. Charles Jaffa 
Mrs. Miles Kastendieck 
Mrs. Warner King 
Mrs. Maxwell Lester 
Mrs. Edith Lincoln 
Miss Jessie Lockitt 
Mrs. William H. Lohman 
Mrs. Frederick D. MacKay 
Mrs. Thomas H. McClintock 
Mrs. Edwin P. Maynard, Jr. 
Mrs. Leonard P. Moore 
Miss Emma Jessie Ogg 
Mrs. Dean C. Osborne 
Mrs. William M. Parke 
Mrs. William B. Parker 
Mrs. Frank H. Parsons 
Mrs. William P. Pashley 
Mrs. Charles E. Perkins 
Mr. Charles Pratt 
Mrs. Stewart M. Pratt 



Mrs. Henry J. Davenport 
Vice-Chairman 

Mrs. Luella Wilson Vaile 
Chairman Boxes 

Mrs. Benjamin Prince 
Mr. G. William Rasch 
Mrs. Valentine K. Raymond 
Miss Agnes Ritchie 
Mrs. Charles E. Rogers 
Mrs. Frederick H. Rohlfs 
Mrs. Rupert A. Root 
Mrs. Donald Ross 
Mrs. Irving J. Sands 
Mrs. F. R. Schepmoes 
Mrs. Robert W. Shearman 
Mrs. Frank E, Simmons 
Mrs. Donald G. C. Sinclair 
Mrs. Ainsworth L. Smith 
Miss Arietta H. Smith 
Mrs. E. A. Sunde 
Mrs. Ernest K. Tanner 
Mrs. Hollis K. Thayer 
Mr. Carl H. Tollefsen 
Mrs. Walter Truslow 
Mrs. Adrian Van Sinderen 
Mrs. Peter V. D. Voorhees 
Mrs. Clarence Waterman 
Mrs. Morris Watkins 
Mrs. Walter F. Watton 
Mrs. Walter F. Wells 
Mrs. George N. Whittlesey 
Mrs. William H. Whitton 
Hon. George A. Wingate 
Mrs. Maude B. Wood 
Miss Elizabeth Wright 



i924\\Ci949 



^^ 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fifth' Concert 

FRIDAY EVENING, April 15 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 



The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 



Richard C. Paine 

Philip R. Allen 
John Nicholas Brown 
Alvan T. Fuller 
Jerome D. Greene 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Francis W. Hatch 



Treasurer 

M. A. De Wolfe Howe 
Roger I. Lee 
Lewis Perry 
Henry B. Sawyer 
Raymond S. Wilkins 
Oliver Wolcott 



George E. Judd, Manager 



[1] 



BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL, 1949 

TANGLEWOOD, LENOX, MASSACHUSETTS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

PROGRAMS 

SERIES A Vivaldi Orchestral Concerto in D minor 

Thursday Eve- Strauss "Death and Transfiguration" 

NiNG, July 28 ^ - r — ^^ . Tx . 

'' ' Br.\hms Symphony No. 2, m D major 

Beethoven Overture to "Egmont" 

Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 4, in G major 

Saturday Eve- (S oloist: Claudio Arra u) 

NING, July 30 Liszt A Faust Symphonv 

(In commemoration of the 200th Anniversary 
of the birth of Goethe) 

Leonard Bernstein, conducting 
ciixTr.Av ATTTirD Schumann Overture to "Manfred" 

SUNDAY after- c u n., • t>w • 

NOON Tulv ^i Schumann Symphony No. 4, in D minor 

Stravinsky "Le Sacre du Printemps" 

SERIES B Tchaikovsky Serenade for String Orchestra 

^ „ Tchaikovsky Violin Concerto 

Thursday Eve- ^5^^^.^^. ^^^^^^ ^^.^^^^^ 

NING, August 4 ^ i ^ 

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4, in F minor 

Roussel Suite in F major 

MiLHAUD Violoncello Concerto No. 2 

Saturday Eve- • (Soloist: Gregor Piatigorsky) 

NING. August 6 Messiaen "L'Ascension" 

Franck Symphony in D minor 

Eleazar de Carvalho, conducting 

Q Aftfd- William Schuman Symphony for Strings 

NOON. August 7 ViLLA-LoBos Maudu-Carara 

Strauss "Thus Spake Zarathustra" 

SERIES C Leonard Bernstein, conducting 

Thursday 'Eve- Schubert Symphony No. 4 ("Tragic") 

NING, August 1 1 Shostakovitch Symphony No. 7 

Haydn Symphony in G major. No. 88 

Saturday Eve- 

NING, August IS Britten Symphony with Chorus 

(First performance) 

C. P. E. Bach Concerto for Orchestra 

Copland "Quiet City" 

Sunday After- j3^3^33y "La Mer" 

noon, August 14 

Beethoven .Symphony No. 5, in C minor 

Extra Concerts — Bach-Mozart Programs July 16, 17, 23, 24. 
For further information apply at subscription office. Symphony 
Hall. 

[2] 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

FIFTH CONCERT 

FRIDAY EVENING, April 15, at 8:30 o'clock 



Progrsim 

C. p. E. Bach Concerto in D major for Stringed Instruments 

(Arranged for Orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg) 

I, Allegro moderato 
II. Andante lento molto 
III. Allegro 

Debussy "La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques 

I. De I'aube a midi sur la mer 
II. Jeux de vagues 
III. Dialogue du vent et de la mer 

INTERMISSION 

Beethoven Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92 

I. Poco sostenuto" 

II. Allegretto 

III. Presto; Assai meno presto; Tempo primo 

I\'. Allegro con brio 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

The Boston Symphony Orchestra in Rehearsal is broadcast weekly on 
the N.B.C. Network (Station WNBC) Monday, 11:30-12:00 P.M. 



[3] 




kAT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 
Fidelifone Supreme $2.50 
Fidelitone Master 1 .50 
Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 
Fidelitone Deluxe.. 1.00 
Fidelitone Flooting Point. 50c 
, ■ tKlflU/ Incorporated 
i CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY BASS 
RECORDS 

Among the many reviews of the new 
album of double bass recordings by 
Serge Koussevitzky, the following are 
quoted' 

Claudia Cassidy (in the Chicago 
Tribune) : 

''Collectors in search of Serge Kous- 
sevitzky's double bass recordings are 
being rescued by a series of circum- 
stances. Perhaps you remember that 
when Boston asked its renowned con- 
ductor what he wanted in token of ad- 
miration and affection in the 25th and 
farewell season, he said he wanted "a 
big gift" for his orchestra. That gift 
was a backlog of financial security, and 
the fast growing Serge Koussevitzky 
Anniversary fund is the result. To 
augment it, a limited edition of 1,000 
albums of Koussevitzky recordings has 
been made available by the Boston or- 
chestra in cooperation with RCA Victor. 
Each is autographed, holds the portrait 
of the player with his instrument now 
hanging in Koussevitzky's Tanglewood 
home, and features three 12-inch, ruby 
vinylite records of the slow movement 
from Koussevitzky's double bass con- 
certo, his Chanson Triste and Valse 
Miniature, and his arrangement of a 
largo by Eccles, plus a lullaby by Laska. 
The recordings were made in 1929, and 
you have to hear what they can do with 
the double bass to believe it. Pierre 
Luboshutz is the accompanist. The price 
is $10, including mailing costs. Address 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Sym- 
phony Hall, Boston 15." 

Jay C. Rosenfeld (in the Berkshire 

Eagle) : 

"Immediately discernible are the at- 
tributes which make orchestral music 
under his direction so absorbing; a 
magnificent conception of line, a con- 
tinuously glowing tone and the peerless 
faculty of maintaining and re-instilling 
vigorous urgency in the music. Except 
for a propensity to make his shifts and 
slides very noticeable, the mechanics 
of the playing are formidable. His in- 
tonation has the character associated 
with Casals and Heifetz, the tone has 
a vivid warmth and the bowing the un- 
canny amplitude of those masters who 
know the secret of preserving intensity 
without expending all their resources. 



[4] 



CONCERTO IN D MAJOR FOR STRINGS 

By Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach 
Bom at Weimar, March 8, 1714; died at Hamburg, December 14, 1788 

Arranged for orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg 
Born at Vilna, July 4, 1883 



Emanuel Bach composed this concerto for viols (with a concertino of quinton, 
viola d'amore, viola da gamba and basse da viole) . The date of composition is not 
ascertainable. The concerto was arranged by Maximilian Steinberg in 1909 for flute, 
two oboes (the second replaced in the slow movement by the English horn, 
labelled "oboe alto" in the score) , bassoon, horn and strings. 

DR. KoussEvrrzKY became acquainted with this concerto as per- 
formed by the Society of Ancient Instruments in Paris, a set of 
viols then being used. It was at his suggestion that Maximilian Stein- 
berg made the present orchestral arrangement. 

Steinberg is known as Director of the Conservatory at Leningrad, 
in which position he succeeded Glazounov on the retirement of that 
musician. Steinberg received his musical education in this conserva- 
tory and studied under both Rimsky-Korsakov and Glazounov. He 
has composed a considerable amount of music, orchestral, vocal, 
chamber and for the stage. He married in 1908 the daughter of 
Rimsky-Korsakov, and it was for this occasion that Stravinsky, then 
a student at the Conservatory, composed his "Fireworks." 

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, second son of Maria Barbara, was 
prepared for a legal career and attended the Universities at Leipzig 
and at Frankfort-on-the-Oder. But a Bach was not easily weaned from 
the traditional profession of his kind. Though his father did not see 
fit to put this one among his numerous sons through an intensive 
musical preparation, the boy attended the Thomasschule at Leipzig 
and no doubt learned still more at home, where his receptive facul- 
ties were alert to the much music-making that went on there. Being 
left-handed, he could not have played a bowed instrument, but from 
childhood acquitted himself admirably upon the clavier 0/ organ. 
It is told that at eleven he could glance over his father's shoulder and 
forthwith play the music he had seen. He composed profusely, even 
at this age. Completing his musical studies at Frankfort, he played 
for Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia as well as the Markgraf Friedrich 
Wilhelm, and had the reigning monarch been more musically inclined 
would probably have been installed as court musician. When the 
younger Friedrich succeeded his father in 1740 this musical enthusiast 
soon made the twenty-four-year-old Bach cembalist of the royal chapel. 

[5] 



Emanuel Bach was never very contented with his position. Frederick 
the Great, being conservative in taste, favored the compositions of 
the brothers Graun in his court, and of Johann Joachim Quantz, his 
flute master, over the more daring and provocative concertos and 
sonatas of the Bach who was nevertheless by his wide repute a dis- 
tinct ornament to the royal retinue. Bach likewise found the endless 
necessity of accompanying his monarch's performances upon the flute 
burdensome. If Frederick, who was inclined to take liberties with 
tempo, imposed his kingly word upon questions of musical taste. Bach 
would stand staunchly for his rights. Karl Friedrich Fasch, his assistant, 
reported Bach's remark that "the King might be the autocrat of his 
kingdom, but enjoyed no prescriptive pre-eminence in the realm of 
art." 

Bach sought release from his position, to which as a Prussian sub- 
ject (by marriage) he was bound. In 1767, he was at last given his 
freedom, and was promptly appointed by the Princess Amalia, the 
King's sister-in-law at Hamburg, as her Kapellmeister. For twenty-one 
years, until his death at the age of seventy-five, Emanuel Bach played 
the clavier and the organ, composed voluminously, and went down 
into history as "the Hamburg Bach." 

Sebastian Bach's organ music, in Burney's opinion, courted "what 
was new and difficult, without the least attention to nature and 
facility." His vocal wTiting was "dry and labored," as compared to 
the "taste" his son displayed. The writer highly praised one of 
Emanuel's twenty-two settings of the "Passion," being apparently not 
even aware that the elder Bach had himself done something note- 
worthy in that line. Nor had he anything to say for the chamber 
music of the father, giving all his attention to the son's "more elegant 
and expressive compositions." 

Burney fully appreciated the importance of Emanuel Bach's in- 
novations. "If Haydn ever looked up to any great master as a model, 
it seems to have been C. P. Em. Bach: the bold modulation, rests, 
pauses, free use of semitones, and unexpected flights of Haydn re- 
mind us frequently of Bach's early works more than of any other 
composer. . . . Em. Bach used to be censured for his extraneous 
modulation, crudities, and difficulties; but, like the hard words of 
Dr. Johnson, to which the public by degrees became reconciled, every 
German composer takes the same liberties now as Bach, and every 
English writer uses Johnson's language with impunity." 

Emanuel Bach's plain leadership in the establishing of the sonata 
form is the more impressive when one notes the veneration in which 
he was held by his successors. Haydn deliberately devoted himself to 
the assimilation of his form, and Mozart acknowledged in the strong- 
est terms the value to posterity of his book, "Search Toward the 

[6] 




Three Words 

that Saved a New School from "Flunking Out" 



To the citizens of a small New England town, things looked bad lor 
awhile. Their new school . . . only halt completed . . . was in trouble. 
The contractor building the school ran into financial difficulties. His 
assets w^ere attached. He couldn't finish the job. 

But three words . . . Bonded by Employers' . . . saved that school. For- 
tunately, the job was bonded by an Employers' Group Insurance Com- 
pany. And under the terms of our Contract Bond we furnished the money 
to complete the construction and give the town its new school. 

The Insurance Alan Serves America 




BONDING SERVICE BY 

The Employers' Group 

Insurance Cotnpanies 

no MILK STREET, BOSTON 7, MASS. 

THE EMPLOYERS" LIABILITY ASSURANCE CORP.. LTD 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS' INSURANCE CO. • THE EMPLOYERS' FIR£ INSURANCE CO. 



[7] 



True Method of Clavier Playing." There is no denying that he gave 
a great initial impulsion toward a fluent and rounded style of in- 
strumental manipulation and thematic development. He was one 
of those musicians who come at a moment when a new vista in 
music is due to be opened up; lacking perhaps greatness in the full 
sense, he yet possessed enough daring and adventure to reach intui- 
tively toward the new way which is in any case on the verge of dis- 
closure. Such a composer has shaken off the shackles of outworn tra- 
dition, but he has not the stature to create a new world for that he 
has rejected. He dreams and gropes, has recourse to the intuitive art 
of improvisation — that trancelike state of mind upon which com- 
posers once relied, but which is now lost to the world. Reichardt, 
who visited Emanuel Bach at Hamburg in 1774, observed him in the 
very act of improvisation: "Bach would become lost for hours in new 
ideas and a sea of fresh modulations. . . . His soul seemed absent 
from the earth. His eyes swam as though in some delicious -dream. 
His lower lip drooped over his chin, his face and form bowed ap- 
parently lifeless over the keyboard." 

[ COPYRIGHTED 1 



"THE SEA" (Three Orchestral Sketches) 
By Claude Debussy 

Bom at Saint-Germain (Seine-et-Oise) , France, August 22, 1862; 
died at Paris, March 25, 1918 



It was in the years 1903-05 that Debussy composed "La Mer." It was first per- 
formed at the Concerts Lamoureux in Paris, October 15, 1905. The first per- 
formance at the Boston Symphony concerts was on March 2, 1907, Dr. Karl Muck 
conductor (this was also the first performance in the United States) . 

"La Mer" is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, 
three bassoons, double bassoon, four horns, three trumpets, two cornets-a-pistons, 
three trombones, tuba, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, glockenspiel (or celesta) , 
timpani, bass drum, two harps, and strings. 

Debussy made a considerable revision of the score, which was published in 1909. 

WHEN Debussy composed "La Mer: Trois Esquisses Symphoni- 
ques," he was secure in his fame, the most argued conaposer in 
France, and, to his annoyance, the most imitated. "UApres-midi d'un 
Faune'* of 1894 and the Nocturnes of 1898 were almost classics, and 
the first performance of "Pellias et M^lisande" was a recent event 
(1902) . Piano, chamber works, songs were to follow "La Mef with 
some regularity; of larger works the three orchestral "Images" were to 
occupy him for the next six years. "Le Martyr de St. Sebastien'* was 
written in 1911; "Jeux" in 1912. 

[8] 



\ 



In a preliminary draft* of "La Mer** Debussy labeled the first 
movement "Mer Belle aux lies Sanguinaires" ; he was attracted prob- 
ably by the sound of the words, for he was not familiar with Corsican 
scenery. The title "Jeux de Vagues" he kept; the finale was originally 
headed "Le Vent fait danser la mer." 

There could be no denying Debussy's passion for the sea: he fre- 
quently visited the coast resorts, spoke and wrote with constant en- 
thusiasm about "my old friend the sea, always innumerable and beauti- 
ful." He often recalled his impressions of the Mediterranean at Cannes, 
where he spent boyhood days. It is worth noting, however, that 
Debussy did not seek the seashore while at work upon his "La Mer" 
His score was with him at Dieppe, in 1904, but most of it was written 
in Paris, a milieu which he chose, if the report of a chance remark 
is trustworthy, "because the sight of the sea itself fascinated him to 
;uch a degree that it paralyzed his creative faculties." When he went 
CO the country in the summer of 1903, two years before the completion 
of "La Mer," it was not the shore, but the hills of Burgundy, whence 
he wrote to his friend Andre Messager (September 12) : "You may 
not know that I was destined for a sailor's life and that it was only 
quite by chance that fate led me in another direction. But I have al- 
ways retained a passionate love for her [the sea]. You will say that 
the Ocean does not exactly wash the Burgundian hillsides — and my 
seascapes might be studio landscapes; but I have an endless store of 
memories, and to my mind they are worth more than the reality, 
whose beauty often deadens thought." 

Debussy's deliberate remoteness from reality, consistent with his 
cultivation of a set and conscious style, may have drawn him from 
salty actuality to the curling lines, the rich detail and balanced 
symmetry of Hokusai's "The Wave." In any case, he had the famous 
print reproduced upon the cover of his score. His love for Japanese 
art tempted him to purchases which in his modest student days were 
a strain upon his purse. His piano piece, "Poissons d'or" of 1907, was 
named from a piece of lacquer in his possession. 

• This draft, dated "Sunday, March 5 at six o'clock in the evening," is in present posses- 
sion of the Eastman School of Music at Rochester. 

[copyrighted] 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Kjeller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 

Refresher courses in music education and' theoretical subjects; courses in 

counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 

individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-Septcmber 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 

[9] 



SYMPHONY NO. 7 IN A MAJOR, Op. 92 

By LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 

Born at Bonn, December 16 (?), 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827 



The Seventn Symphony, finished in the summer of 1812, was first performed on 
December 8, 1813, in the hall of the University of Vienna, Beethoven conducting. 

It is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two 
trumpets, timpani and strings. The dedication is to Moritz Count Imperial von 
Fries. 

BEETHOVEN was long in the habit of wintering in Vienna proper, and 
summering in one or another outlying district, where woods and 
meadows were close at hand. Here the creation of music would closely 
occupy him, and the Seventh Symphony is no exception. It was in the 
summer of 1812 that the work was completed.* Four years had elapsed 
since the Pastoral Symphony, but they were not unproductive years. 
And the Eighth followed close upon the Seventh, being completed 
in October, 1812. Beethoven at that time had not yet undertaken 
the devastating cares of a guardianship, or the lawsuits which were 
soon to harass liim. His deafnesj^, although he still attempted to 
conduct, allowed him to hear only the louder tones of an orchestrii. 
He was not without friends. His fame was fast growing, and his 
income was not inconsiderable, although it showed for little in the 
haphazard domestic arrangements of a restless bachelor. 

The sketches for the Seventh Symphony are in large part indeter- 
minate as to date, although the theme of the Allegretto is clearly 
indicated in a sketchbook of 1809. Grove is inclined to attribute the 
real inception of the work to the early autumn of 1811, when Bee- 
thoven was staying at Teplitz, the fashionable watering place near 
Prague where he later met Goethe and where, in 1811, he seems to 
have enjoyed himself in a congenial gathering of intellectuals and 
musical friends. 

But under just what circumstances Beethoven composed this 
symphony — or any of his major works, for that matter — must remain 



* The manuscript score was dated by the composer "1812; Slten "; then follows the 

vertical stroke of the name of the month, the rest of which a careless binder trimmed off, 
leaving posterity peripetually in doubt whether it was May or July. 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachuseits 

Accredited in the art of sinking by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 

mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 

[10] 



conjectural. Beethoven met at Teplitz Amalie Sebald, toward whom 
then and a year later there is evidence that he cherished tender feelings. 
It was in the summer of 1812 that he wTOte his impassioned letter to 
the "Immortal Beloved" — and thereupon, in a sudden access of that 
divine energy he alone could command, he began and completed the 
Eighth Symphony. 

It would require more than a technical yardstick to measure the true 
proportions of the Seventh symphony —the sense of immensity which it 
conveys. Beethoven seems to have built up this impression by wilfully 
driving: a sinq-le rhvthmic fissure throug^h each movement, until the 
music attains (particularly in the body of the first movement, and in 
the Finale) a swift propulsion, an effect of cumulative growth which 
is akin to extraordinary size. 

The long introduction (Beethoven had not used one since his 
Fourth Symphony) unfolds two vistas, the first extending into a 
succession of rising scales, which someone has called "gigantic stairs," 
the second dwelling upon a melodious phrase in F major which, 
together with its accompaniment, dissolves into fragments and evapo- 
rates upon a point of suspense until the rhythm of the Vivace, which 
is indeed the substance of the entire movement, springs gently to life 
(the allegro rhythm of the Fourth Symphony was born similarly but 
less mysteriously from its dissolving introduction). The rhythm of 
the main body of the movement, once released, holds its swift course 
almost without cessation until the end. There is no contrasting theme. 
When the dominant tonality comes in the rhythm persists as in the 
opening movement of the Fifth Symphony, which this one resembles 
and outdoes in its pervading rhythmic ostinato, the "cellule" as 
d'Indy would have called it. The movement generates many subjects 
within its pattern, which again was something quite new in music. 
Even the Fifth Symphony, with its violent, dynamic contrasts, gave 
the antithesis of sustained, expansive motion. Schubert's great 
Symphony in C major, very different of course from Beethoven's 
Seventh, makes a similar effect of size by similar means in its Finale. 
Beethoven's rhythmic imagination is more virile. Starting from three 
notes it multiplies upon itself until it looms, leaping through every 
part of the orchestra, touching a new secret of beauty at every turn. 
VV^agner called the symphony "the Dance in its highest condition; the 
happiest realization of the movements of the body in an ideal form." 
If any other composer could impel an inexorable rhythm, many times 
repeated, into a vast music — it was Wagner. 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 



[•>] 



In the Allegretto Beethoven withholds his headlong, capricious 
mood. But the sense of motion continues in this, the most agile of his 
symphonic slow movements (excepting the entirely different Allegretto 
of the Eighth). It is in A minor, and subdued by comparison, but 
pivots no less upon its rhythmic motto, and when the music changes to 
A major, the clarinets and bassoons setting their melody against triplets 
in the violins, the basses maintain the incessant rhythm. The form 
is more unvarying, more challenging to monotony than that of the 
first movement, the scheme consisting of a melody in three phrases, the 
third a repetition of the second, the whole repeated many times 
without development other than slight ornamentation and varied 
instrumentation. Even through two interludes and the fugato, the 
rhythm is never broken. The variety of the movement and its replen- 
ishing interest are astounding. No other composer could have held 
the attention of an audience for more than a minute with so rigid a 
plan. Beethoven had his first audience spellbound with his harmonic 
accompaniment, even before he had repeated it with his melody, 
woven through by the violas and 'cellos. The movement was encored 
at once, and quickly became the public favorite, so much so that 
sometimes at concerts it was substituted for the slow movements of 
the Second and Eighth Symphonies. Beethoven was inclined, in his 
last years, to disapprove of the lively tempo often used, and spoke of 
changing the indication to Andante quasi allegretto. 

The third movement is marked simply "presto/' although it is a 
scherzo in effect. The whimsical Beethoven of the first movement is 
still in evidence, with sudden outbursts, and alternations of fortissimo 
and piano. The trio, which occurs twice in the course of the move- 
ment, is entirely different in character from the light and graceful 
presto, although it grows directly from a simple alternation of two 
notes half a tone apart in the main body of the movement. Thayer 
reports the refrain, on the authority of the Abbe Stadler, to have 
derived from a pilgrims* hymn familiar in Lower Austria. 

The Finale has been called typical of the "unbuttoned" (aufge- 
knopft) Beethoven. Grove finds in it, for the first time in his music, 
"a vein of rough, hard, personal boisterousness, the same feeling which 
inspired the strange jests, puns and nicknames which abound in his 
letters. Schumann calls it "hitting all around" ("schlagen um sich'*). 
"The force that reigns throughout this movement is literally prodi- 
gious, and reminds one of Carlyle's hero Ram Dass, who had 'fire 
enough in his belly to burn up the entire world.' " Years ago the 
resemblance was noted between the first subject of the Finale and 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



[12] 



Beethoven's accompaniment to the Irish air "Nora Creina," which he 
was working upon at this time for George Thomson of Edinburgh.* 
It is doubtful whether a single hearer at the first performance of the 
Seventh Symphony on December 8, 1813, was fully aware of the 
importance of that date as marking the emergence of a masterpiece 
into the world. Indeed, the new symphony seems to have been looked 
upon as incidental to the general plans. The affair was a charity concert 
for war victims.f Johann Nepomuk Malzel's new invention, the 
"mechanical trumpeter," was announced to play marches "with full 
orchestral accompaniment," but the greatest attraction of all was 
Beethoven's new battle piece, Wellington's Victory, or the Battle of 
Vittoria, which Beethoven had designed for Malzel's "Pan-harmoni- 
can" but at the inventor's suggestion rewritten for performance by a 
live orchestra. This symphony was borne on the crest of the wave of 
popular fervor over the defeat of the army of Napoleon. When 
Wellington's Victory was performed, with its drums and fanfares and 
God Save the King in fugue, it resulted in the most 'sensational 
popular success Beethoven had until then enjoyed. The Seventh 
Symphony, opening the programme, was well received, and the 
Allegretto was encored. The new symphony was soon forgotten when 
the English legions routed once more in tone the cohorts of Napoleon's 
brother in Spain. 

Although the Seventh Symphony received a generous amount of 
applause, it is very plain from all the printed comments of the time 
that on many in the audience the battle symphony made more of an 
impression than would have all of the seven symphonies put together. 
The doubting ones were now ready to accede that Beethoven was a 
great composer after all. Even the discriminating Beethoven enthusi- 
asts were impressed. When the Battle of Vittoria was repeated, the 
applause, so wrote the singer Franz Wild, "reached the highest ecstasy," 
and Schindler says: "The enthusiasm, heightened by the patriotic 
feeling of those memorable days, was overwhelming." This music 
brought the composer directly and indirectly more money than 
anything that he had written or was to write. 

The initial performance of the Symphony, according to Spohr, was 
"quite masterly," a remark, however, which must be taken strictly 



* In an interesting article, "Celtic Elements in Beethoven's Seventh Symphony" (MitsiccU 
Quarterly, July, 1935 ) , James Travis goes so far as to claim : "It is demonstrable that the 
themes, not of one, but of all four movements of the Seventh Symphony owe rhythmic and 
melodic and even occasional harmonic elements to Beethoven's Celtic studies." 

However plausibly Mr. Travis builds his case, basing his proofs upon careful notation, 
it is well to remember that others these many years have dived deep into this s3rmphony in 
pursuit of special connotations, always with doubtful results. D'Indy, who called it a "pastoral" 
symphony, and Berlioz, who found the scherzo a "ronde des paysans^," are among them. The 
industrious seekers extend back to Dr. Carl Iken, who described in the work a revolution, 
fully hatched, and brought from the composer a sharp rebuke. Never did he evolve a more 
purely musical scheme. 

t The proceeds were devoted to the "Austrians and Bavarian? wounded at Hanau" in 
defense of their country against Napoleon (once revered by Beethoven). 

[»3] 



according to the indifferent standards of his time, rather than our own. 
The open letter which the gratified Beethoven wrote to the Wiener 
Zeitung thanked his honored colleagues "for their zeal in contributing 
to so exalted a result." The letter was never published, and Thayer 
conjectures that the reason for its withdrawal was Beethoven's sudden 
quarrel with Malzel, whom he had singled out in this letter with 
particular thanks for giving him the opportunity "to lay a work of 
magnitude upon the altar of the Fatherland." 

The concert was repeated on Sunday, December 12, again with full 
attendance, the net receipts of the two performances amounting to 
4,000 florins, which were duly turned over to the beneficiaries. 
Schindler proudly calls this "one of the most important movements in 
the life of the master, in which all the hitherto divergent voices save 
those of the professional musicians united in proclaiming him worthy 
of the laurel. A work like the Battle Symphony had to come in order 
that divergent opinions might be united and the mouths of all op- 
ponents, of whatever kind, be silenced." Tomaschek was distressed thai 
a composer with so lofty a mission should have stooped to the "rude 
materialism" of such a piece. "I was told, it is true, that he himself 
declared the work to be folly, and that he liked it only because with 
it he had thoroughly thrashed the Viennese." Thayer assumes that 
Beethoven's musical colleagues who aided in the performance of the 
work "viewed it as a stupendous musical joke, and engaged in it con 
amore as in a gigantic professional frolic." 

The Seventh Symphony had a third performance on the second of 
January, and on February 27, 1814, it was performed again, together 
with the Eighth Symphony. Performances elsewhere show a somewhat 
less hearty reception for the Seventh Symphony, although the Alle- 
gretto was usually immediately liked and was often encored. 
Friedrich Wieck, the father of Clara Schumann, was present at the 
first performance in Leipzig, and recollected that musicians, critics, 
connoisseurs and people quite ignorant of music, each and all were 
unanimously of the opinion that the Symphony — especially the first 
and last movements — could have been composed only in an unfor- 
tunate drunken condition (' trunkenen Zustdnde") . 

[copyrighted] 



[M] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^^°\^°^d^^^Z"^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E. . Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5. 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis ; 

Overture to "Egmont" 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3, 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetzj, Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin 

coin Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto ; Air from "Semele" (Dorothy May nor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

KhatcliH ton rial) Piano Concerto (Soloist: William Kapell) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201 ) ; E-fiat (184) ; C major 

(338); Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokotieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March ; "Peter and 
the Wolf" ; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite ; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" ; "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) : 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole. Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 • 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording ) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5: "Pohjola's DMiighter"; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (Sanroma) ; Song of the Volga Rargemen 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5. 6 : Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberou 

[15] 




SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 




~Mi'HPMWM,i/ 



Recording EXCLUSIVELY for RCA Victor, they fa 
you a wealth of their greatest performances 
encore after encore! Among them: 



• Mc 



\a Mere L'Oye Suite — Ravel. The Bosfon Symphony 
chestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor. DM-1268, $3.50. 
• Symphony No. 4, in A, Op. 90 ("Italian")— MendeN 
The Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Conduii 
RCA Victor Album DM- 1259, $4.75. | 



THE WORLD'S GIes 



r i6 1 




HAVE YOUl 





1 



mPj... 



JEANETTE MacDONALD 



• Depuis le jour from "Louise" — Chorpentier, and Je veux 
vivre dans ce reve from "Romeo and Juliet" — Gounod. Jean- 
ette MacDonald. Record 15850, $1.25. 

• Operetta Favorites. Album includes Smoke Gets in Your 
Eyes, They Didn't Believe Me, Donkey Serenade, Romany 
Life, four others. Jeanette MocDonald. MO-1071, $4. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, ex- 
clusive of local taxes. Price of single record does not include Federal 
Excise tax. ("DM" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



EST ARTISTS ARE 



Ony 



»D THE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



d^ 



r«7] 



To the 

Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra 



At a Testimonial Dinner to be held in honor of 
Dr. Koussevitzky in Symphony Hall, Boston, on 
May 2nd, the Friends o£ the Orchestra will present 
to Dr. Koussevitzky a scroll bearing the names of 
all who, at his request, have joined in making the 
biggest gift ever made to the Orchestra in its long 
history. 

The scroll ^vill include not only the 3,300 names 
of those ^vho have already enrolled, but iji addi- 
tion the names of all who may desire to take the 
opportunity between now and May 2nd to par- 
ticipate in this fitting tribute to our great Con- 
ductor. In the scroll reference will also be made to 
contributions that have come to us through our 
radio listeners. 

Those whose honored names are listed on the 
following pages are members of our Society out- 
side the Boston area. . 

To them in particular I have been asked by the 
Trustees to express their deep gratitude for loyal 
and generous support during this Anniversary 
Year. 

Edward A. Taft 
Chairman^ Anniversary Fund 

Those who may desire to enroll before April 30th may 
do so simply by sending a check payable to Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra, addressed to the Friends of the Orches- 
tra, Symphony Hall, Boston 15, Massachusetts. Such gifts 
are tax deductible. 



[18] 



Non-resident Friends of the Boston 

Syjnphony Orchestra and 

Contributors to the Anniversary Fwid 

in Honor of Serge Koussevitzky 



Season of 1948-1949 



Dr. and Mrs. George Abeloff— Biooklyn, X.Y. 

Mr. Herbert Abraham— Xe^v York City 

Mrs. Georoe Abrich— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Laurence Achilles— New York City 

Mrs. ^Villiam Ackerman— New York City 

Miss Edith Adler— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. ^Valter Adler— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. John G. Aldrich— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Putnam C. Aldrich— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Allen— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. Harold L. Ailing— Rochester, X.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Lloyd V. Almirall— Xe^\" York 
City 

American Committee for the AVeizmann In- 
stitute of Science, Inc., Xew York City 

Lt. Col. John L. Ames— ^Vashington, D.C. 

Mrs. Copley Amory— "Washington, D.C. 

Miss Cora G. Amsden— Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Anderson— Providence.. 
R.I. 

Mr. Philip T. Andrews— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Vincent Andre^vs— So. Attleboro, Mass. 

Mrs. R. Edwards Annin, Jr.— East Greenwich, 
R.I. 

Anonymous— Providence, R.I. 

Arnold. Mrs. George C— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. George C. Arvedson— Detroit, Mich. 

Mr. and Mrs. Randolph Ashtori— Morrisville. 

Pa. 
Mr. Fred B. Avakian— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Donald S. Babcock— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Margaret L. Babcock— Seekonk. Mass. 
Miss Katherine F. Backus— Toledo, Ohio 
Mrs. Cornelia M. Baekeland— X'ew^ York City 
Mr. George A. Baker, Jr.— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Harvev A. Baker— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. John H. Baker— Xew York City 
Mrs. Edward L. Ballard— Xew York City 
Mr. Frederick C. Balz— Englewood, X'.J. 
Miss Helen L. Bass— Cranford, X.J. 
Dr. and Mrs. Reuben C. Bates— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Vernal W. Bates— Branford, 

Conn. 
Miss Jane Bauer— Upper Montclair, N.J. 
Mr. Emil J. Baumann— Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Mr. Gerald F. Beal-New York Citv 
Mrs. Howard W. Beal— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Jean Bedetti— Miami Beach, 

Fla. 



Beetho\en Club of Providence— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Frank Begrisch— Xew York Citv 
Beinecke Foundation— Xew York City 
Mrs. Albert M. Bell-Long Island, X.Y. 
Mrs. Haughton Bell— Brooklvn, X.Y. 
Miss Mar\- Benedict— Santa Barbara, Calif. 
Dr. and Mrs. Emanuel \V. Benjamin— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Miss Georgina Bennett— Hackensack, X'.J. 
Mrs. Winchester Bennett— Xew Haven, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar F. Berg— Brooklyn, X.Y, 
Mrs. Emilie Berger— East Greenwich, R.I. 
Mrs. Henri L. Berger— Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Anna Berley— Crowpond, X.Y. 
Dr. Beatrice Bergman— Xew York City 
Mr. Louis K. Berman— Xew York City 
Mrs. Henry J. Bernheim— Xew York City 
Mr. Theodore F. Bernstein— X'ew York City 
Miss Dorothy L. Betts— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Rene Bickart— X'ew York City 
Mrs. A. W. Bingham, Jr.— X'e^v York City 
Miss Mary Piatt Birdseye— X'e-^v^ York City 
Blackstone \'alley Music Teachers' Society— 

Pawtucket, R.I. 
Miss Margaret G. Blaine— Xew York City 
Mr. Michael Blasco— X'ew York City 

Mr. Jacob Blaustein— Baltimore, Md. 
Misses Ada and Janet Blinkhorn— Providence, 
R.I. 

Miss Muriel F. Bliss— Attleboro, Mass. 

Hon. and Mrs. Robert Woods Bliss— Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Dr. Rhea C. Blue-W^ashington, D.C. 

Mrs. Edward C. Blum— Brooklvn, X.Y. 

Mrs. Julius Blum— Xew York Citv 

Mr. Robert E. Blum-Brooklyn, X.Y. 

Miss Mildred A. Blumenthal— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Sidney Blumenthal— Xew York City 

Mrs. David Blumstein— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. Henry Boehm— Xew^ York City 

Dr. Walter S. Boemstein— X^ew York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Benjamin Bogin— Springdale, 
Conn. 

Mr. A. Bolnick— Elmer, X.J. 

Mr. E. Bonoff-^Voodmere, X.Y. 

Mr. Adolphe E. Borie— Santa Barbara, CaHf. 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Bowden— Irv'ington, 
N.Y. 

Mr. Alfred C. Bowman— Long Island, X.Y. 

Dr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Braids— Providence, 
R.I. 



[•9 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mrs. Selma M. Breitenbach— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brier— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. N. E. Brill— New York City 

Mrs. Richard de Wolfe Brixey— New York City 

Mrs. Elsie S. Bronson— Basye, Va. 

Mr. and Mrs. Curtis B. Brooks— Providence, 
R.I. 

Miss Clara Jane Brown— Waterport, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. John Nicholas Brown— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mrs. Robert P. Brown— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Herbert S. Brussel— New York City 

Miss Billy Bryant— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. C. Warren Bubier— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. Charles W. Bubier, Sr.— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Walker Buckner— New York City 

Miss R. Ethel Bugbee— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Arthur M. Bullowa— New York City 

Dr. and Mrs. Alex M. Burgess— Providence, 
R.I. 

Dr. C. C. Burlingame— Hartford, Conn. 

Mr. J. Campbell Burton— New York City 

Miss Alice D. Butterfield— New York City 

Mrs. Duncan Buttrick— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. F. H. Cabot— New York City 

Mrs. Samuel Hyde Cabot— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. John Hutchins Cady— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Maria L. Camardo— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Wallace Campbell— Peace Dale, R.I. 

Mrs. D. H. Cardozo, Jr.— New York City 

Mrs. Andrew G. Carey— New York City 

Mrs. H. B. Carey— Farmington, Conn. 

Miss Edith M. L. Carlborg— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Sigfrid H. Carlson— Wallum Lake, R.I. 

Miss Gertrude Carpenter— Upper Montclair, 
N.J. 

Mrs. Gilbert Congdon Carpenter— East Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mr. J. N. Carpenter— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. James W. Carpenter— Manhasset, N.Y. 

Miss Mary E. Carpenter— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Otis Swan Carroll— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Miss Anne Carter— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Fred S. Carver— Short Hills, N.J. 

Mrs. W. R. Castle— Washington, D.C. 

Mrs. E. Gerry Chadwick— New York City 

Dr. and Mrs. Francis Chafee— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Gladys E. Chamberlain— New York City 

Mrs. B. D. Chambers— Columbia, S.C. 

Chaminade Club— Edgewood, R.I. 

Mme. Avis Bliven Charbonnel— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. Thomas Cheyne— New York City 

Miss Ottilie Chirite— Detroit, Michigan 

Chopin Club of Providence, R.I. 

Miss Louise Clancy— Riverside, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger T. Clapp— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederic S. Clark, Jr.— New York 
City 

Mrs. Henry Cannon Clark— Westport, N.Y. 

[20] 



Miss Sydney Clarke— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Elizabeth Clever— New York City 

Mrs. Sidney Clifford -Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Chalmers D. Clifton— New York City 

Mrs. Jennings Clymer— Philadelphia, Penn. 

Mrs. Henry E. Cobb— Bronx ville, N.Y. 

Miss Marian C. Coffin— New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. William A. Coffin— Englewood, N.J. 

Miss Dinah Cohen— Bronx, N.Y. 

Mrs. Frank Cohen— New York City 

Dr. Herman Cohen— Bronx, N.Y. 

Miss Miriam Cohen— New York City 

Mr. Wilfred P. Cohen— New York City 

Miss Constance Coleman— New York City 

Mrs. Dayton Colie— South Orange, N.J. 

Mr. Oilman Collier— New York City 

Mr. James C. Collins— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. G. W. Colton-Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Dr. A. Lambert Cone— New York City 

Mrs. G. Maurice Congdon— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. W. P. Conklin— Farmington, Conn. 

Miss Theresa R. Coolidge— New York City 

Mrs. Stanley M. Cooper— New Britian, Conn. 

Mrs. Grace M. Cox— New York City 

Miss Kathryn D. Cox— Manchester, Conn. 

Miss Margaret Cranford— Greenwich, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace F. Creasy— Cranston, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gordon K. Creighton— Long 
Island, N.Y. 

Mrs. F. S. Crofts— Stamford, Conn. 

Miss Anna C. Cromwell— Summit, N.J. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick W. Crone— Jackson 
Heights, N.Y. 

Mrs. Charles Cross— San Francisco, Calif. 

Mrs. Gammell Cross— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Parsons Cross— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Miss Maytie Case Crowell— Manchester, Conn. 

Miss Mary C. Cro; well— Warren, R.I. 

Mrs. Joseph H. Cull— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Waldo E. Cummer— Jacksonville, Fla. 

Mrs. Charles C. Cushman— East Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. H. W. Cutler— New York City 

Miss Mary Daboll— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Emma H. Dahlgren— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Murray S. Danforth— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Lewis H. Davidson— Englewood, N.J. 
Mrs. William H. P. Davisson— Glen Cove, N.Y. 
Mrs. Daniel A. de Menocal— New York City 
Mr. Vincent Dempsey— University City, Mo. 
Mr. W. W. Dempster— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Leopold Demuth— New York City 
Mr. John Deveny— Glendale, Calif. 
Mrs. Paul C. DeWolf— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Myrtle T. Dexter-Central Falls, R.I. 
Mr. Frederick Dietrich— New York City 
Mrs. Robert E. Dietz— New York City 
Mrs. Clarence C. Dittmer— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Charles W. Dodge— Rochester, N.Y. 
Mrs. L. K. Doelling-New Rochelle, N.Y. 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mr. Max Doft— Long Island, New York 
Mrs. Wallace B. Donham— Hamilton, N.Y. 
Dr. and Mrs. George B. Dorff— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Edith A. Dresser— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Elsie J. Dresser— West Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. Robert B. Dresser— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Marian Drury— Portland, Conn. 
Miss Ethel DuBois— New York City 
Mrs. George DuBois— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. A. H. Duerschner— Flushing, N.Y. 
Mr. Charles E. Duquette, Jr.— Commicut, R.I. 
Miss Flora E. Dutton— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Margaretta L. Dwight— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Charles R. Easton— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. C. E. Eaton— Orange, N.J. 

Mrs. Edward R. Eberle— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Florence L. Eccles— Waterbury, Conn. 

Mrs. Edna Eckstein— Long Island, N.Y. 

Miss Cornelia Ann Eddy— New Orleans, La. 

Miss Edith W. Edwards— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Gurney Edwards— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. William H. Edwards— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Carl Ehlermann— New York City 

Mr. Louis H. Ehrlich— New York City 

Mrs. H. G. Einstein— New York City 

Mrs. Lewis A. Eldridge— Great Neck, N.Y. 

Mrs. N. M. Elias— New York City 

Mrs. Frank M. Eliot— Washington, D.C. 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis Elliott— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Emerson— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. Robert S. Emerson— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mrs. Edward A. Emery— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Gertrude J. Emery— Woonsocket, R.I. 

Mr. Howard M. Ernst— Harrison, N.Y. 

Mr. Irving N. Espo— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Esty— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Miss Anna L. Evans— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Edmund C. Evans— Malvern, Pa. 

Mrs. William H. Evans, Jr.— Detroit, Mich. 

Miss Caroline S. Eveleth— W^indsor Locks, 
Conn. 

Mrs. Walter G. Everett— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Howard L. Fales— Glendale, R.I. 

Mrs. Edwin A. Farnell— Forestdale, R.I. 

Miss Helen M. Farwell— Lancaster, Pa. 

Mr. Jenner R. Fast— Hillsdale, N.J. 

Mrs. W. R. Fawcett— Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mr. Edward M. Fay— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. W. Rodman Fay— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Feiner— Providence, 

R.l. 
In Memory of Mrs. Pauline B. Fels— New York 

City 
Dr. J. Lewis Fenner— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Dana H. Ferrin— Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Mr. Sampson R. Field— New York City 
Mr. John L. Firth— Evanston, 111. 
Miss Louise M. Fish— Pawtucket, R.L 



Miss Mary R. Fitzpatrick— New York City 

Misses Grace and Joan Fletcher— Warren, R.I. 

Miss Rebecca P. Flint— Troy, N.Y. 

Mrs. Oscar Foley— Tacoma, W^ash. 

Mr. and Mrs. George L. Foote— New York City 

Mrs. James S. Ford— AVilmington, Del. 

Mr. Sumner Ford— New York City 

Miss Helen Foster— Buffalo, N.Y. 

Miss Flora Fox— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. J. Dwight Francis— Santa Bar- 
bara, Calif. 

Mrs. Lewis W. Francis— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

In Memory of Mrs. Marie Franklin— New 
York City 

Mrs. Clarke F. Freeman— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Hovey T. Freeman— Providence, 
R.I. 

W. P. H. F. and M. E. B. 

Mr. Arthur L. Friedman— New York City 

Mr. Stanleigh P. Friedman— New York City 

Miss Helen Frisbie— Waterbury, Conn. 

Miss E. W. Frothingham— Tarrytown, N.Y. 

Miss Edna B. Fry— East Orange, N.J. 

Miss Margaret A. Fuller— Providence, R.L 

Miss Marjorie Fuller— Stamford, Conn. 



Mr. Stephen Lee Gaillard— Bronxville, N.Y. 
Mrs. Guy P. Gannett— Cape Elizabeth, Maine 
Mr. and Mrs. B. Gardner— New York City 
Miss Frances M. Gardner— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. Herman Gardner— New York City 
Miss Marion A. Gardner— New York City 
Mrs. Emil H. Gartner,— Edgewood, R.L 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Gately— Providence, 

R.L 
Mr. and Mrs. Leslie N. Gebhard— Taunton, 

Mass. 
Miss Katharine R. Geddes— Toledo, Ohio 
Mrs. Leo Gershman— Providence, R.L 
Dr. Donald F. Gibson— Danbur)', Conn. 
Mr. J. S. Gilbertson— So. Glastonbury, Conn. 
Mrs. Arthur L. Gillett— Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. Frederick Huntington Gillett— Washing- 
ton, D.C. 
Mrs. P. H. Glassberg— New York City 
Mr. David M. Glassford-Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. R. H. I. Goddard, Jr.— Providence, R.L 
Mr. A. J. Goldfarb-New York City 
Mr. Emanuel Goldman— New York City 
Mr. Arthur J. Goldsmith— New York City 
Mrs. M. H. Goodkind— New York City 
Mr. Walter Goodkind— New York City 
Jacob and Libby Goodman Foundation— New 

York City 
Mr. and Mrs. John D. Gordan— New York Cit) 
Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hale Goss— Providence, 

R.L 
D. S. Gottesman Foundation— New York City 
Mr. Keith H. Goudey— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. Harry L. Grant— Providence, R.L 
Mr. V. Brent Graves— New York City 
Mrs. Percy R. Gray— Brooklyn, N.Y. 



[21] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Miss Charlotte M. Greene— Warren, R.I. 
Mrs. E. Milo Greene— Westport, Conn. 
Miss Iris Greene— Woonsocket, R.I. 
Mrs. Marion Thompson Greene— New York 

City 
Mrs. W. B. Greenman— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Bertha C. Greenough— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Helen M. Greenough— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. William Bates Greenough— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Rose Greenwald— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. George E. Gregory— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. George H. Gribbin— Hastings- 

on-Hudson, N.Y. 
Miss Grace C. Griswold— Kent, Conn. 
Mr. \Valter W. Gross— New York City 
Mr. Mortimer Grunauer— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Liang Guh— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Baldwin Guild— Hastings-on- 

Hudson, N.Y. 
Mrs. Luther Gulick— Bronxville, N.Y. 
Mrs. Leo S. Guthman— Chicago, 111. 

Mr. James A. Haertlein— Maracaibo, 

Venezuela 
Miss Anna C. Hallock— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. N. Penrose Hallowell— New 

York City 
Dr. Edmund H. Hamann— Riverside, Conn. 
Mrs. Edward C. Hammond— New London, 

Conn. 
Mrs. Jerome J. Hanauer— New York City 
Mr. Frank R. Hancock— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. George F. Handel— New York City 
Miss Edith G. Hardwick-Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. F. M. G. Hardy— Redding, Conn. 
Miss Louise Harris— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Jean L. Harry— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Henry C. Hart— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. S. F. Hartman— New York City 
Miss Anna Hartmann— Shorewood, Wis. 
Mrs. J. C. Hartwell— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Samuel C. Harvey— New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Jonathan H. Harwood— East Greenwich, 

R.I. 
Miss Elizal)eth Hatchett— New York City 
Miss Jane J. Hawley— New York City 
Mrs. Harold B. Hayden— Plattsburgh, N.Y. 
Mrs. David S. Hays— New York City 
Miss Dorothy M. Hazard— Cranston, R.I.' 
Mr. and Mrs. Clifford D. Heathcote— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Mrs. Irving Heidell— New York City 
Miss E. Adele Heller— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. E. S. Heller- New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Louis L. Hemingway— New 

Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. S. B. Hemingway— New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Ellwood Hendrick— New York City 
Miss Bessie Hepstonstall— Edgewood, R.I. 
Mr. Jacques Hermann— New York City 
Mrs. Ross V. Hersey— Providence, R.I. 



Mrs. Daniel C. Hey, Jr.— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Paul Heymann— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. David B. Hill-Glendale, Calif. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick Whiley Hilles— Ham- 
den, Conn. 

Mr. Robert L. Hilliard— Kingston, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Samuel M. Himmelblau— West 
Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Frank L. Hinckley— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Walter A. Hirsch— New York City 

Mrs. Benjamin Lewis Hirshfield— New York 
City 

Mr. Harold K. Hochschild— New York City 

Mrs. Paul H. Hodge— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Arthur Hodges— Lakeville, Conn. 

Mrs. H. Hoermann— Roseland, N.J. 

Mrs. Kenneth Hoffman— Darien, Conn. 

Mr. and Mrs. Henry Hofheimer— New York 
City 

Mrs. Lester Hofheimer— New York City 

Mrs. Bernard J. Hogue— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. G. M. Hollstein— New York City 

Mrs. Regina Holz^vasser- New York City 

Mr. Henry Homes— New York City 

Miss Myra H. Hopson— Kent, Conn. 

Mr. Edwin R. Horn— Allentown, Penn. 

Mrs. C. H. Horner— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Priscilla P. Horr— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Rosalie Housman— New York City 

Mrs. E. H. Howard— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Eva Howell— Mt. Vernon, N.Y. 

Mrs. James W. Hubbell— Scarsdale, N.Y. 

Miss Alice M. Hudson— East Orange, N.J. 

Mrs. Lea Hudson— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. B. W. Huebsch— New York City 

Mrs. Karl Humphrey— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Alice Arnold Hunt— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Carlos F. Hunt— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Charlotte A. Hunt— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. John C. Hunt— Washington, Conn. 

Miss Ruth Hunt— East Orange, N.J. 

Mrs. R. L. Hutchins— New York City 

Miss Libbie H. Hyman— Millwood, N.Y. 

Mr. Hans A. Illing— Los Angeles, Calif. 

Miss Gertrude V. Ingersoll— New York City 

Dr. and Mrs. Howard H. Ingling— Springfield, 
Ohio 

Mrs. Arthur Ingraham— Little Compton, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Earle Nye Ingraham— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Miss Louise M. Irelin— New York City 

Mrs. Leopold Jaches— New York City 
Mrs. F. Ell is 'Jackson— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Lilian Jackson— Garden City, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Jacobson— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. George W. Jacoby— New York City 
Mrs. H. K. James— Hamden, Conn. 
Mr. Halsted James— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Sidney Jarcho— New York City 
Miss Edith L. Jarvis— New York City 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mrs. Edward P. Jastram— Providence, R.I. 

Mr, Philip S. Jastram— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Pierre Jay— New York City 

Mrs. Theodore C. Jessup— Ridgefield, Conn. 

Mr. Charles Jock^vig— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Melvin F. Johnson— Shreveport, La. 

Miss Dorothy E. Joline— Xew^ York City 

Mrs. Theodore H. Joseph— Mamaroneck, N.Y. 

Mr. George E. Judd, Jr.— Oklahoma City, 

Okla. 
Mr. AVilliam M. Judd— New York City 
Mrs. Stanley Judkins— Larchmont, N.Y. 

Mrs. A. W. Kaflfenbiirgh— New York City 

Mr. Leo B. Kagan— New^ York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Stuart B. Kaiser— Washington, 

D.C. 
Miss Sarah F. Kaminsky— New^ York City 
Mr. Maxim Karolik— Newport, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Oscar Karrel— New York City 
Mrs. B. S. Kaufman— New^ York City 
Mrs. Herbert M. Kaufmann— New^ York City 
Mrs. F. Kaulsen, Jr.— New^ York City 
Mrs. George A. Keeney— Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Mrs. Sidney A. Keller— New^ York City 
Mr. and Mrs. A. Livingston Kelley— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard A. Kellev— \'alley Falls, 

R.I. 
Mr. William D. Kelley, Jr.-Wallingford, 

Conn. 
Miss Florence B. Kelly— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Florence M. Kemp— New^ Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Frederick B. Kent— Barrington, R.I. 
Miss Jane Kerley— New^ York City 
Mr. H. D. Kesten-Saddle River, N.J. 
Mrs. Willard A. Kiggins— Summit, N.J. 
Mrs. AVarner King— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Eugene A. Kingman— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Thomas J. Kingston— Merchantville, N.J. 
Miss Ellen Kirk— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. M. H. Klebar— New York City 
Mr. Frederick B. Klein— Yonkers, N.Y. 
Mrs. H. C. Knapp-Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Victor W. Knauth— New York 

City 
Miss Edith Kneeland— New York City 
Miss Anita E. Knight— New^ York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Alfred A. Knopf— New York 

City 
Mrs. Elsa Koenig— Los Angeles, Calif. 
Mrs. Paul H. Kolb— Winston-Salem, N.C. 
Mr. Louis Konigsberg— New^ York City 
Mr. David P. Kopeck— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Lewis Henry Koplik— New^ York City 
Mr. ^Villiam A. Koshland— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto L. Kramer— New York 

City 
Mrs. Fred Krause— New York City 
Miss Sarah Kreutzenauer— New York City 
Mr. Paul R. Ladd— Providence, R.I. 
David and Joan Landman— New York City 
Mr. Jacob Landy— New York City 



Mrs. J. B. Lane— New York City 

Mrs. Jesse E. Langsdorf— New York City 

Miss E. Gertrude Lawson— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Benjamin Lazrus— New York City 

Mr. Elliott H. Lee— New York City 

Miss Stella Lee— New^ Y'ork City 

Mr. and Mrs. Clement Lenom— New York City 

Miss Priscilla H. Leonard— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mr. William Lepson— New York City 

Mrs. Austin T. Levy— Harrisville, R.I. 

Miss Esther Levy— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Richard Lewinsohn— Brooklyn, 

N.Y. 
Mr. Daniel Lieberfeld— New York City 
Mrs. Joseph L. Lilienthal— New York City 
Mrs. Richard F. Lindsay— Honolulu, T.H. 
Miss Marion Litchfield— New" York City 
Willoughby Little Foundation— Providence, 

R.I. 
Dr. Henry D. Lloyd— Little Compton, R.I. 
Mrs. M. I. Lock^^'ood— New" York City 
Ed^v'in Loewy Foundation, Inc.— New York 

City 
Mr. Ronald S. Longlev— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. Farnsworth Loomis— Tuxedo Park, N.Y. 
Mr. J. E. Lopez— New York Citv 
Miss Helen D. Loring— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. George Y. Loveridge— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 
Mrs. Madeline M. Lo^v- New York City 
Mrs. Ralph G. Lumb— Paw^tucket, R.I. 
Mr. J. M. Richardson Lyeth— New York City 
Miss Margaret H. Lyman— New" York Citv 

Mr, Hugh F. MacColl— Providence, R.I. 

MacDow^ell Club— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Vivien Ma cKenzie— Santa Barbara, Calif. 

Mrs. Kenneth B. MacLeod— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Janet S. MacLeod— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Norman D. MacLeod— Kenyon, R.I. 

Commodore and Mrs. Gary Magruder— James- 
town, R.I. 

Dr. and Mrs. Herbert L. Mahood— Maple- 
wood, N.J. 

Mrs. Theodore R. Malsin— Scarborough, N.Y. 

Mrs. G^vendoline Manuel— Brooklvn, N.Y. 

Mr. Allen Markoff— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Samuel F. MarkofE— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Frederick \V. Marks, Jr.— New 
York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Marks— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mr. W. G. Marquette— PIeafant\iile, N.Y. 

Mrs. Albert E. Marshall— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Margaret Marshall— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Christina K. Martin— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Everett Martine— Palisades, N.Y. 

Mr. Charles E. Mason, Jr.— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Gabriel R. Mason— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Stanley H. Mason— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Hazen Y. Mathewson— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Frank W. Matteson— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Katharine Matthies— Sevmour, Conn. 

Miss Elaine A. Mauger— Pro\ idence, R.I. 

[23] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mrs. Charles H. May— New York City 
Mrs. Edgar Mayer— Tarry town, N.Y. 
Mrs. Edwin Mayer— New York City 
Mr. David H. McAlpin— New York City 
Mr. Alan J. McBean— Bronxville, N.J. 
Mrs. Jay C. McClure— New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Irving J. McCoid— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Robert McKelvy— New York City 
Mr. David H. McKillop-Washington, D.C. 
Dr. Christie E. McLeod— Middletown, Conn. 
Miss Helen McPherson— New York City 
Mr. J. Thomas McQuaid— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Miss Helen M. McWilliams— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Pauline A Mean— New York City 
Miss Cecille L. Meeker— Cleveland, Ohio 
Miss Wilhelmine S. Meissner— Bayside, N.Y. 
Miss Hortense Mendel— New York City 
Mr. Ralph J. Mendel -New York City 
Mr. Nils Menendez— Los Angeles, Calif. 
Mr. Paul A. Merriam— Edge wood, R.I. 
Mrs. Charles H. Merriman— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. E. Bruce Merriman— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Marie Mesrobian— Forest Hills, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. G. Pierce Metcalf— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Houghton P. Metcalf— Middleburg, Va. 
Mrs. Jesse H. Metcalf— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Alfred Meyer— New York City 
Mrs. K. G. Meyer— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Otto Meyer— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Miller— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mr. Alex Miller— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Arthur H. Miller— New York City 
Mrs. M. J. Miller- Westfield, N.J. 
Mrs. Rosalie W. Miller— Mt. Pleasant, Mich. 
Mrs. R. D. Moffett— New York City 
Miss J. Edith Monahan— New York City 
Mrs. G. Gardner Monks— Washington, D.C. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward Montchyk— South 

Orange, N.J. 
Miss Eva A. Mooar— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Taylor More— New York City 
Miss Frances K. Morris— Menlo Park, Calif. 
Miss Ruth Morris— New York City 
Miss Alice L. Morse— New York City 
Mr. William H. Mortensen— Hartford, Conn. 
Mrs. David P. Moulton— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Mowry— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Irene L. Mulick— Cranston, R.I. 
Miss A. Andrea Munster— East Greenwich, 

R.I. 
Miss Linda Musser— Muscatine, Iowa 



Mr. and Mrs. George W. Naumburg— New 

York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Walter W. Naumburg— New 

York City 
Miss Evelyn Necarsulmer— New York City 
Miss Grace M. Neill— Woodstock, Conn. 
Miss M. Louise Neill— Woodstock, Conn. 
Miss Katharine B. Neilson— Buffalo, N.Y. 
Dr. Harold Neuhof— New York City 



Mr. and Mrs. Andrew H. Neuss— Bayonne, 
N.J. 

Mr. John S. Newberry, Jr.— Grosse Pomte 
Farms, Mich. 

Mr. and Mrs. Alfred H. Newburger— New 
York City 

Dr. Anne Newhall— Los Alamos, New Mexico 

Mr. and Mrs. John W. Nickerson— West Hart- 
ford, Conn. 

Mrs. J. K. H. Nightingale— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. J. K. H. Nightingale, Jr.— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. E. W. Nolte-New York City 

Miss Lillie Norman— New York City 

Mrs. Bertha Obermeyer— New York City 
Miss Marian O'Brien— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. Robert J. Ogborn— New York City 
Miss Emma Jessie Ogg— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Barbara Quint Oldman— Eggertsville, 

N.Y. 
Mrs. Sydney Olliver-Hollis, N.Y. 
Mrs. George H. Opadyke— West Hartford, 

Conn. 
Miss Ida Oppenheimer— New York City 
Dr. and Mrs. Seymour Oppenheimer— New 

York City 
Mr. Edwin M. Otterbourg— New York City 



Miss Bertha Pagenstecher— New York City 
Miss Alice Temple Parkin— New York City 
Miss Esther Pauline Parsons— Johnston, R.I. 
Dr. and Mrs. Harold J. Pearce— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Henry H. Pease— New York City 
Mrs. Frederick S. Peck— West Barrington, R.I. 
Miss Hilda M. Peck— Bristol, Conn. 
Mrs. VV. H. Peckham— Sloatsburg, N.Y. 
Mr. Dwight A. Peirce— Scotia, N.Y. g 

Mrs. Lionelle Perera— New York City Jj 

Mrs. Charles E. Perkins— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Jess Perlman— Madison, Conn. 
Mr. Max Perlstein— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Peters— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Carl H. Pforzheimer— Purchase, N.Y. 
Miss Lillian Phelps— San Antonio, Texas 
Mr. Norman A. Phemister— Long Island, N.Y. 
Mrs. Clarence H. Philbrick— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. George F. Phillips— Bristol Highlands, 

R.I. 
Miss Jean R. Phillips— Washington, D.C. 
Mrs. Max Pick— New York City 
Mrs. Francis C. Pinkham— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Albert R. Plant— Providence, 

R.I. 
Miss Janet F. Piatt— Milford, Conn. 
Mrs. George A. Plimpton— Berkeley, Calif. 
Miss Grace L. Plimpton, Hartford, Conn. 
Miss Mary L. Plimpton— Hartford, Conn. 
Mr. and Mrs. C. B. Podmaniczky— Brooklyn, 

N.Y. 
Mrs. Emery M. Porter— Providence, R.I. 



[24] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Continued) 



Mr. George Eustis Potts— Ormond Beach, Fla. 

Mrs. T. I. Hare Powel— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Alvin L. Powell— Glen Ridge, N.J. 

Miss Dorothy Powell— New York City 

Mr. Ralph A. Powers— New London, Conn. 

Mrs. William Prall— New York City 

Mrs. F. E. Pratt— New York City 

Mrs. H. Irving Pratt, Jr.— Long Island, N.Y. 

Miss Rose Presel— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. James Quan— New York City 

Mrs. Albert E. Rand— Barrington, R.L 
Mrs. Alice K. Ratner— San Francisco, Calif. 
Mr. and Mrs. Alan M. Ravenal— Providence, 

R.L 
Miss Jeanne E. Raymond— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. Frederic B. Read— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. Ludwig Regensteiner— Cranston, R.L 
Mrs. A. William Reggio— Washington, D.C. 
Mrs. Clara B. Relyea— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. John Harsen Rhoades— New York City 
Miss Dorothy L. Rice— Providence, R.L 
Miss Eva Rich— New York City 
Mr. Charles A. Riegelman— New York City 
Mr. Martin L. Riesman— Providence, R.L 
Miss Helen E. Roby— Detroit, Mich. 
Mrs. John L. Rochester— Buffalo, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Roitman— Cranston, 

R.L 
Mr. Edward Ronicker— West Milton, Ohio 
Mrs. Moritz Roos— New York City 
Miss Hilda M. Rosecrans— New York City 
Mr. Abraham Rosenbaum— Bronx, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Edwin Rosenberg— New York 

City 
Miss Bertha Rosenthal— New York City 
Mr. Laurence B. Rossbach— New York City 
Mr. Michael Rostovtzeff— New Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Aaron H. Rubenfeld— Scarsdale, N.Y. 
Mrs. T. Rubinsky— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Ralph C. Runyon— New York City 
Miss Sarah B. Russell— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Thomas W. Russell— Hartford, Conn. 

Mrs. Aaron B. Salant— New York City 
Lady Salter— New York City 
Mr. Charles F. Samson— New York City 
Mr. F. B. Sappington— Frederick, Md. 
Mr. Jacob H. Scheuer— New York City 
Mrs. David Scheyer— Birmingham, Mich. 
Mr. Henry G. Schiff-New York City 
Mrs. Fred Schloss— New York City 
Mrs. Emy Schlossinger— New York City 
Mr. Adolf Schmid— Leonia, N.J. 
Dr. David Schoen— Long Island, N.Y. 
Mr. Arthur Schooley— Kansas City, Mo. 
Miss Helen E. Schradieck— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Carl Schraysshuen— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. J. Schullinger— New York City 
Mr. Arthur A. Schwarz— Providence, R.L 
Mr. Harry A. Schwartz— Providence, R.L 
Mr. Richard S. Schwartz— Chicago, 111. 



The Misses Scott— New York City 
Miss Sarah Eayes Scott— Darien, Conn. 
Miss Edith Scoville— New York City 
Mrs. Wallace M. Scudder— Newark, N.J. 
Miss May Seeley— New York City 
Mrs. Carl Seeman— New York City 
Mrs. Isaac W. Seeman— New York City 
Mrs. George Segal— Long Island, N.Y. 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester F. Shaal— Edgewood, R.L 
Mr. Philip M. Shapiro— AVashington, D.C. 
Dr. and Mrs. Ezra A. Sharp— Providence, R.L 
Miss Ellen D. Sharpe— Providence, R.L 
Mr. and Mrs. Henry Dexter Sharpe— Provi- 
dence, R.L 
Mr. Edwin F. Sherman— Barrington, R.L 
Miss Elizabeth P. Sherman— Plainville, Conn. 
Miss Florence Sherman— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss Helen M. Shire— New York City 
Dr. and Mrs. E. Shorr— New York City 
Mrs. Reinhard Siedenburg— Greenwich, Conn. 
Mrs. Robert E. Simon— New York City 
Mr. Ben Sinel— Pawtucket, R.L 
Mrs. B. A. Sinn— New York City 
Dr. Olga Sitchevska— New York City 
Mrs. Caroline Sizer— Ne^v Haven, Conn. 
Mrs. Waldron Slutter— Garden City, N.Y. 
Miss Alice E. Smith— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. Edgar L. Smith— New York City 
Miss Gertrude Robinson Smith— New York 

City 
Miss Hope Smith— Providence, R.L 
Miss Jean Barclay Smith— Lemoyne, Pa. 
Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Smith— Providence, R.L 
Mrs. William Smith— New York City 
Miss Marion E. Solodar— New York City 
Mrs. I. S. Solomon— New York City 
Mr. Albert Spalding— New York City 
Mrs. Ernest H. Sparrow— New York City 
Miss Frieda S. Spatz— New York City 
Mr. and Mrs. Girard Spencer— New York City 
Miss Ada Sperber— New York City 
Mrs. Harold E. Squire— Mount Vernon, N.Y. 
Mrs. Philip B. Stanley— New Britain, Conn. 
Mr. Lewis M. Stark— New York City 
Miss Sophie B. Steel— Sloatsburg, N.Y. 
Mrs. Arthur Stein— New York City 
Mr. Julius Steiner— New York City 
Mrs. Albert M. Steinert— New York City 
Mr. Meyer Stern— North Bergen, N.J. 
Mrs. William Stanford Stevens— New York 

City 
Mr. M. H. Stieglitz— New York City 
Mrs. W. M. Stobbs— Attleboro, Mass. 
Mrs. Elias A. Stoler— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mr. Jacob C. Stone— New York City 
Mrs. Morris E. Storyk— New York City 
Miss A. W. Stowell— Bronxville, N.Y. 
Miss Aline C. Stratford— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. Irwin Strauss— Ne^y York City 
Mrs. J. M. Strauss— New York City 
Mrs. B. W. Streifier— Kew Gardens, N.Y. 
Mrs. M. E. Strieby— Maplewood, N.J. 
Dr. George T. Strodl— New York City 



[25] 



FRIENDS OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA (Concluded) 



Mrs. S. J. Stroheim— New York City 
Mrs. James R. Strong— Short Hills, N.J. 
Mr. S. Clarence Stuart— New York City 
Mrs. Arthur P. Sumner— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. M. A. Sunderland— New York City 
Mrs. Walter I. Sundlun— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Helen T. Sutherland— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. and Mrs. Aaron Sverdlik— New York City 
Mr. Simon Sverdlik— New York City 
Miss Jean Swift— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Helen Sylvester— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Eliza F. W. Taft— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Louise Talma— New York City 
Mr. Paul Tamarkin— Providence, R.I. 
Mrs. Jerome Tannenbaum— New York City 
Miss Frances Taussig— New York City 
Mrs. W. F. Terradell-Plainfield, N.J. 
Mr. Thornton C. Thayer— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Mrs. John Henry Thompson— Farmington, 

Conn. 
Mrs. R. C. Thomson— Montclair, N.J. 
Miss Ruth F. Thomson— Pawtucket, R.I. 
Mrs. Edward L. Thorndike— New York City 
Mrs. Paul Tishman— New York City 
Miss Margaret E. Todd— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. S. H. Tolles, Jr.— Cleveland, Ohio 
Mr. Stirling Tomkins— New York City 
Mr. Joseph H. Towle— Philadelphia, Penn, 
Mrs. R. H. Trott— Providence, R.I. 
Miss Elsie R. Trowbridge— New Haven, Conn. 
Miss Ruth True— Spring Valley, N.Y. 
Mr. Howard M. Trueblood— New York City 
Miss Alice Tully— New York City 
Mr, Robert C. Turnbull— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Marie E. Uhrhock Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. Carl J. Ulmann— New York City 

Mrs. Sophie Kerr Underwood— New York City 

Miss Dorothy Utterback— Lincoln, Nebraska 

Mrs. W. E. VanBoskirk— Cranford, N.J. 

Miss Catherine S. VanBrunt— Kitchawan, N.Y. 

Mr. and Mrs. Byron E. VanRaalte— Hewlett, 
N.Y. 

Dr. and Mrs. T. Wayland Vaughan, Washing- 
ton, D.C. 

Miss Anne T. Vernon— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Richmond Viall— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Seth C. Vining— Los Angeles, Calif. 

Mrs. Edwin C. Vogel— Greenwich, Conn. 

Mrs. Tracy Voorhees— New York City 

Miss Hazel M. Walker— Pawtucket, R.I. 

Mrs. Helen W. Walker— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Ashbel T. W^all— Providence, 

R.I. 
Mrs. Frederic A. Wallace— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Edwin J. Walter— New York City 
Miss Anne S. Wanag— Brooklyn, N.Y. 
Miss M. Beatrice Ward— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Allen Ward well— New York City 
Mr. Eugene Warren— Troy, N.Y. 



Mrs. George B. Waterhouse— Apponaug, R.I. 

Mr. Phillips R. Weatherbee— Providence, R.I. 

In memory of Mrs. George H. Webb— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Miss Mabel Webb— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Dr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Webber— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mrs. Arthur P. Weeden— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Elizabeth G. Weeks— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. F. C. Weems— New York City 

Dr. and Mrs. Arthur Weil— New Haven, Conn. 

Mr. Leon J. Weil— New York City 

Mr. Robert C. Weiriberg— New York City 

Mr. Louis Weisberg— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Mark Weisberg— Providence, 
R.I. 

Miss Deborah D. Weisel— Springfield, Mo. 

Mr. and Mrs. John H. Wells— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Conrad B. Wessell— Wilmington, N.C. 

Miss Mary Wheatland, New Haven, Conn. 

Mrs. A. R. Wheeler— Newport, R.I. 

Mrs. L. R. Wheeler— New York City 

The Mary C. Wheeler School— Providence, 
R.I. 

Miss Ruth A. Whipple— Cranston, R.I. 

Mrs. Gustave J. S. White— Newport, R.I. 

Mrs. Osborne White— Kentfield, Calif. 

Miss Rosa White— Larchmont, N.Y. 

Mrs. Robert H. Whitmarsh— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Helen L. Whiton— Westerly, R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. George N. Whittlesey— Brook- 
lyn, N.Y. 

Mrs. H. VanWyck Wickes— Rye, N.Y. 

Mr. Herbert W. Widmann— Providence, R.I. 

Mrs. Anna U. Wilcox— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Morton Wild— New York City 

Mr. Irwin Wile— New York City 

Mr. and Mrs. Louis P. Willemin, Jr.— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mr. G. Wightman Williams— Washington, 
D.C. 

Mrs. Grace E. Williams— Providence, R.I. 

Dr. and Mrs. H. W. Williams— Providence, 
R.I. 

Mr. and Mrs. Charles P. Williamson— Provi- 
dence, R.I. 

Mrs. Hugh D. Wilson— Passaic, N.J. 

Miss Ellen Winsor— Malvern, Penn. 

Miss Mary Withington— New Haven, Conn. 

Misses Anna and Tillie Wolff— Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Misses Blanche M. and Ellen A. Wolff- 
Brooklyn, N.Y. 

Mr. Claude M. Wood— Providence, R.I. 

Miss Mabel Woolsey— Providence, R.I. 

Mr. Carroll M. Wright— New York City 

Mr. Lucien Wulsin— Cincinnati, Ohio 

Mr. Philip Wyman— Cincinnati, Ohio 

Miss Pearl Yanofsky— New York City 
Mr. Ellis L. Yatman— Providence, R.I. 
Mr. Art Yellen-Buffalo, N.Y. 

Mrs. August Zinsser— Ridgefield, Conn. 



[26] 



MUSIC AND THE SATANIC 

By Ernest Newman 
The Sunday Times, London, January 2, 194^ 



SPEAK of the Devil and he is sure to appear, for he is the most 
sociable of the Immortals; and once he has settled down with you 

it is difficult to get rid of him. Take my own case of late. For some 
weeks it was my agreeable duty to think about him in connection with 
the Don Juan saga. Then, for pure pleasure's sake, I turned to the 
brilliant dialectic of the scene in hell in "Man and Superman," where, 
as usual, the Devil talks better sense than anyone else, though Mr. 
Shaw, apparently, does not think so. Next I read that we are to have 
another broadcast of "Enoch Soames." Then I am invited to Sadler's 
Wells to see "Schwanda," with it most companionable of all operatic 
Devils. 

And now, to crown all, I have received from the American publisher 
Mr. Alfred Knopf a copy of Thomas Mann's new novel, "Doctor 
Faustus," in the 25th chapter of which is an astounding dialogue, of 
quite Goethean power, between the Devil and the latest Faust, a 
fictitious modern German composer named Adrian Leverkiihn. (I 
shall return to the book in more detail one of these days.) Manifestly 
Beelzebub does me the honour of desiring as much of my society as 
he can get just now; and I beg to assure him that no caller could be 
more welcome. I have always found him the most stimulating of 
company and the prince of conversationalists; and if I had a soul 
which I could flatter myself was worth his or anyone's purchase I 
should be delighted to have a friendly business talk on the subject 
with him. 

So far as music is concerned the Devil is a modern creation, for only 
our subtly harmonic modern music can do him anything like justice. 
But to do that, of course, a composer must have something of the 
Devil in himself; it was for lack of this that Cesar Franck painted so 
unconvincing a portrait of Satan in the "Beatitudes." Berlioz was the 
first to blaze this particular trail. He was a greater portent than the 
historians have yet recognised. Before him, most of the greatest achieve- 
ments of music had been in the sphere of the ethical, or at a very short 
remove from it. Berlioz had nothing whatever of the northern ethical 
in his musical make-up. As I have pointed out on previous occasions, 
he was primarily a southern visuel; he had the keenest of eyes for the 
shapes and colours of things in his field of vision, and he painted what 
he saw and delighted in. He could call a "sacred trilogy" the "Child- 
hood of Christ," for example, without feeling the smallest interest 

[27] 



in the religious aspect of the subject; what fascinated him were the 
human figures and the local backgrounds against which they stood 
defined. So it was again with the great Requiem Mass; at the slightest 
hint of encouragement in the text, or, indeed, without any that is 
immediately perceptible to us, he abandons the ethical to concentrate 
on an apocalyptic visual image. 

Shocked critics in the 19th century censured him for what they 
called his excessive realism; and even today people who ought to know 
better screw their mouths into a patient smile, as at a child whom 
grown-ups feel they must indulge for a moment in his funny little 
whimsies, when they listen to such movements as the orgy of brigands 
in "Harold in Italy." Why it should be any more beneath the dignity 
of art to paint the orgies of brigands in the Abruzzi than to paint the 
ecstasies of angels in heaven I have never been able to understand. 
At any rate Berlioz, when describing his brigands, was painting 
creatures he had seen; while I have yet to meet with a composer with 
any first-hand acquaintance with angels in their natural habitat. All 
the musicians can do with these is to perform variant after variant on 
a few conventional and now worked-out formulae; Berlioz's brigands 
have at least a musical life entirely their own and his. 

Music had to be emancipated from its age-long thraldom to the 
celestial before it could 'tackle successfully the no less interesting in- 
fernal. The old way of dealing musically with the Devil was to treat 
him, as Weber does in the Wolfs Glen scene in "Der Freischiitz" as 
merely the wicked reverse side of the virtuous. Berlioz saw him as he 
is and takes the sympathetic interest in him that so great a power 
deserves — the final scene of the "Damnation of Faust" was only a 
momentary concession to convention. 

His Mephistopheles and the witches of the last movement of the 
Fantastique are not simply the unlit side of the good but evil shining 
by its own light. Since Berlioz's day the satanic has come more and 
more into its own in music. In vain did Luther cry out against the 
Devil having all the best tunes to himself: most modern composers 
write better music for their sinners than for their saints, a reflection 
which may have occurred the other evening to others besides myself 
as they listened to the broadcast of Liszt's "Christus" and then remem- 
bered his Mephisto Waltz. Ormuzd seems to have had his day in music, 
and what a glorious day it has been! Ahriman is now due for an 
innings. I should like to live to see the day when the right music is 
found for that tremendous talk between the Devil and Adrian 
Leverkiihn. 



[28] 



Academy of Music, Brooklyn 



SIXTY-NINTH SEASON, 1949-1950 
FIVE CONCERTS BY THE 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor 



On Five FRIDAY Evenings 

at 8:30 

NOVEMBER 11 

DECEMBER 9 

JANUARY 13 

FEBRUARY 17 

MARCH 17 



AUSPICES 

The Brooklyn Institute of Arts and Sciences 
The Philharmonic Society of Brooklyn and a Brooklyn Committee 
Renewals of subscription for the 1949-50 series by the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
may now be made. New subscriptions will be accepted in order of receipt of appli- 
cation. 

Mail Orders Given Prompt Attention. A seating plan and order blank will be sent 
on application. 

Telephone: STerling 3-6700 
Address: Academy of Music, 50 Lafayette Avenue, Brooklyn, N.Y. 



[29] 



i^' 






.,,■,■!>;;' "^- ' 



:#-'# 












li '" i^¥ ■■■■'■-■ ? 

S#: >^. ■ ::';;. /^? _B;^, 



.:.: ^-^:;--^ _|r 






s? ^' 



^^« 






>.fi> sy 












LIST OF WORKS 

Performed in the Brooklyn Series 
DURING THE SEASON 1948-1949 



C. p. E. Bach Concerto in D major tor Stringed Instruments 

(Arranged for Orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg) 

V April 15 

Beetho\en Symphony No. 7, in A major, Op. 92 V April 15 

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68 II Jan. 14 

Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90 IV March 18 

Bruckner Adagio from the String Quintet IV March 18 

Co WELL Hymn and Fuguing Tune No. 2 II Jan. 14 

Debussy "La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques V April 15 

Dl\moxd •. .Rounds for String Orchestra II Jan. 14 

Hanson Concerto in G major for Pianoforte and 

Orchestra, Op. 36 II Jan. 14 

Soloist: Rudolf Firkusnv 

Prokofieff Symphony No. 3, Op. 100 I Nov. 12 

Ravel Concerto for Piano and Orchestra I Nov. 1 2 

Soloist: Jesus Maria Sanroma 

"Daphnis et Chloe," Ballet (Second Suite) I Nov. 12 

RiMSKV-KoRSAKOV Suitc from the Op&ra, "The Fairy Tale 

of Tsar Saltan" (After Pushkin) IV March 18 

Stravinsky Capriccio, for Piano and Orchestra III Feb. 18 

Soloist: Soulima Stravinsky 

Concerto in D for String Orchestra III Feb. 18 

Ode in Three Parts, for Orchestra III Feb. 18 

Orpheus, Ballet in Three Scenes III Feb. 18 

AVeber Overture to "Euryanthe" IV March 18 

IGOR STRAVINSKY conducted the concert on Felmiary 18, RICHARD BURGIN 
on March 18 

[31] 



DOUBLE BASS RECORDS 

By Serge Koussevitzky 

The Anniversary Album of Double 
Bass records by Serge Koussevitzky (pri- 
vate souvenir pressing) is now on sale at 
the Box Office. The proceeds (at $10 
each) will benefit the Koussevitzky 25th 
Anniversary Fund. 

Address mail orders to Symphony Hall, Boston 15, 
Mass. ($10 includes shipping charge). 



• THE BOSTON SYMPHONY 

CONCERT BULLETIN 

• THE BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 

PROGRAM 

• THE BOSTON POPS PROGRAM 

The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra 

PUBLICATIONS 

CoTerage: Higher Income Groups 
Positions: All Conspicuous 
Rates: Moderate 



Total Circulation More Than 500,000 



For Information and Rates Call 
Mrs. Dana Somes, Advertising Manager 
Tel. CO 6-1492, or write : . 
Symphony Hall, Boston 15, Mass. 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mi. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Oilman in the 
N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.oo per volume 

Address. SYMPHONY HALL, 

. BOSTON, MASS. 



[32] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston EIcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofeky 
Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovid 
Einar Hansen 
D^iniel Eisler 

Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minoi Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Meivin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 
Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap^ 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 

Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 

Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 

Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakii 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 

Manuel Valerio 
Atlilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 
E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra Bassoon 
Boaz Filler 

Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 

Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Oros7 

Tuba 

Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stembuig 
Charles Smith 



Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



iiiiii:* 




lal6tom 



The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — 'Mt is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWm PIAKO COMPAQ 

160 Boylston St., Boston . Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
faldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON, HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 



Cambridge Programmes 






r/'i 







r" 



•■1 



?9 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



\ 



X 



iiiiii/i 



^7?/^^ 



r> 



\if — 



wv^^ 



"iWJ 



H 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948-1949 

Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [<^arvard University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 
PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 



Violins 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 
Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir ResnikofiE 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 

Vorman Carol 
Carlos Pinfield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 
Frank Zecchino 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 
Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 



Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 



George Humphrey 
Louis Artieres 

Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon MarjoUet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 

George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valeric 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
El ford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






i924\Vvi949 



I* 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
First Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, October 26 

with historical and descriptive notes by 

John N. Burk 



The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Henry B. Sawyer . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Jacob J. Kaplan 

Alvan T. Fuller Roger I. Lee 

Jerome D. Greene Lewis Perry 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



^EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
^ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




Tlie EMPLOTEBS* LimUUty Attanma Corp»nuiom I 
The EWLOTEItS' fire ImtuniK* Comtpmtty 
AMERICAN EKPLOTEBS' Imummm Ctmfmmf 



Dear Friends; 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back eind watch the flaunes when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . majiy, many persons die each year from' 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls them boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create am atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family emd 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 





Your local Employers' Group insurance agent, 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[2] 



Sanders Theatre, Cambridge \Harvard Umversity'^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FIRST CONCERT 



TUESDAY EVENING, October 26 



Program 

RICHARD BURGIN Conducting 

Brahms Symphony No. 3 in F major. Op. 90 

I. Allegro con brio 

II. Andante 

III. Poco allegretto 
IV. Allegro 

INTERMISSION 

Bruckner Adagio from the String Quintet 

RiMSKY-KoRSAKOv Suite from the Opera, "The Fairy Tale 

of Tsar Sakan" (After Pushkin) 
I. Allegretto alia marcia 
II. Introduction to Act II 

IV. The Three Wonders (Introduction to last scene) 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 



live 
again 
these 
moments . . . 

realistically reproduced 
with the 




AT -YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 

FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 



PERMO 






Incorporated 

Chicago 26 



VALEDICTORY 

» » An ancient and distinguished 
orchestra has taken on new lustre 
and fame under the leadership of 
Dr. Serge Koussevitzky. For almost 
^ 25 years he has given, in the words 
of Harry Cabot, speaking for the 
trustees, "the most brilliant lead- 
ership and the most devoted serv- 
ice which the orchestra has ever 
enjoyed from anybody." 

We knew that Dr. Koussevit- 
zky's resignation would come some 
time, but we have put off think- 
ing of it as a thing that might be 
wished away in the same fashion 
we have begrudged the ending of 
a particularly luminous concert. 
More than anybody else in the 
list of distinguished conductors, 
he has fulfilled Colonel Higgin- 
son's specification of a "permanent 
orchestra under a permanent con- 
ductor." 

In the past quarter of a century, 
he has guided an orchestra which 
had emerged from a series of crises 
to new and golden heights of dis- 
tinction and beauty, recasting, 
reshaping, retraining until the 
merger of leader and men into a 
unified whole has made the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra rare and 
unique — a possession of incom- 
putable value — in the world. 

— From an editorial in the Promdence 
Journal, April 11, 1948 



U] 



SYMPHONY NO. 3, IN F MAJOR, Op, 90 
By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, 1897 



Composed in 1883, the Third Symphony was first performed at a concert of the 
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, December 2, 1883, Hans Richter conducting. The 
first American performance was in New York, October 24, 1884, at a Novelty Con- 
cert by Mr. Van der Stucken. The first performance in Boston was by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, under Wilhelm Gericke, on November 8, 1884. 

The Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassooiu 
and contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings. 

THE world which had waited so many years for Brahms' First Sym- 
phony was again aroused to a high state of expectancy when six 
years elapsed after the Second, before a Third was announced as 
written and ready for performance. It was in the summer of 1883, at 
Wiesbaden, that Brahms (just turned fifty) completed the symphony 
which had occupied him for a large part of the previous year. 
Brahms, attending the rehearsals for the first performance, in Vienna, 
expressed himself to Biilow as anxious for its success, and when 
after the performance .1 was proclaimed in print as by far his best 
work, he was angry, fearing that the public would be led to expect 
too much of it, and would be disappointed. He need not have 
worried. Those who, while respecting the first two symphonies, had 
felt at liberty to weigh and argue them, were now completely con- 
vinced that a great symphonist dwelt among them; they were only 
eager to hear his new score, to probe the beauties which they knew 
would be there. The Vienna premiere was a real occasion. There was 
present what Kalbeck called the "Wagner-Bruckner ecclesia militans/' 
whose valiant attempt at a hostile demonstration was quite ignored 
and lost in the general enthusiasm. For the second performance, which 
was to be in Berlin, Brahms made conflicting promises to Wiillner 
and Joachim. Joachim won the honor and Brahms repeated the new 
symphony,, with Wullner's orchestra, three times in Berlin, in the 
month of January. Biilow at Meiningen would not be outdone, and 
put it twice upon the same programme. City after city approached 
Brahms for a performance, and even from France, which to this day 
has remained tepid to Brahms, there came an invitation from the 
Societe des Concerts modernes over the signature of Benjamin Godard. 
When the work was published in 1884 (at an initial fee to the com- 
poser of $9,000), it was performed far and wide. 

If the early success of the Third Symphony was in some part a 
succes d'estime, the music must also have made its way by its own 

[5] 



sober virtues. Certainly Brahms never wrote a more unspectacular, 
personal symphony. In six years' pause, the comf)oser seemed to have 
taken stock of himself. The romantic excesses which he had absorbed 
from Beethoven and Schumann, he toned down to a fine, even glow, 
which was far truer to the essential nature of this self-continent dreamer 
from the north country. The unveiled sentiment to which, under the 
shadow of Beethoven, he had been betrayed in the slow movement 
of his First Symphony, the open emotional proclamation of its final 
pages; the Schumannesque lyricism of the Second Symphony, its sunlit 
orchestration and clear, long-breathed diatonic melody, the festive 
trumpets of its Finale — these inherited musical traits were no longer 
suitable to the now fully matured symphonic Brahms. His brass hence- 
forth was to be, if not sombre, at least subdued; his emotionalism more 
tranquillized and innig; his erstwhile folklike themes subtilized into a 
more delicate and personal idiom. In other words, the expansive, 
sturdy, the militantly bourgeois Brahms, while outwardly unchanged, 
had inwardly been completely developed into a refined poet quite 
apart from his kind, an entire aristocrat of his art. 

"The peculiar, deep-toned luminosity" of the F major Symphony 
was the result, so it can be assumed, of that painstaking industry 
which was characteristic of Brahms, and there is circumstantial con- 
firmation in the manuscript score which is in the possession of Dr. 
Jerome Slonborough in Vienna. Karl Geiringer has examined the 
manuscript and his description of it is among the fund of valuable 
matter divulged in the writer's "Brahms: His Life and Work." 

"It shows a large number of small pencilled revisions in the orches- 
tration, which the master probably made during the rehearsals. Thus, 
for instance, the change of the clarinets in the first movement, from 
B-flat to A, was not originally planned; and for the second movement 
Brahms wanted to make use of trumpets and drums, but subsequently 
dispensed with these, as not conforming with the mood of the Andante. 
On the other hand, the bassoons, and the trumpets and drums of the 
Finale, were later additions. Such meticulous consideration of the 
slightest subtleties of orchestral colouring belies the thoughtlessly re- 
peated catchword that Brahms was not greatly interested in the prob- 
lems of instrumentation." 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

MUSIC RESEARCH LABORATORY by NICOLAS SLONIMSKY 
A weekly seminar for two hours Monday afternoons at 4 p.m. The purpose 
is to quicken music appreciation and to recognize and label various musical 
phenomena; also to examine musical problems of today, modern composi- 
tion, musical lexicography, and national music in all countries. 
For further information, apply to the Dean. 
290 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

[6] 



"Like the first two symphonies, the Third is introduced by a 
'motto/ " * also writes Geiringer; "this at once provides the bass for 
the grandiose principal subject of the first movement, and dominates 
not only this movement, but the whole Symphony. It assumes a par- 
ticularly important role in the first movement, before the beginnmg 
of the recapitulation. After the passionate development the waves of 
excitement calm down, and the horn announces the motto, in a mystic 
E-flat major, as a herald of heavenly peace. Passionless, clear, almost 
objective serenity speaks to us from the second movement. No Andante 
of such emotional tranquillity is to be found in the works of the 
youthful Brahms. Particularly attractive is the first theme of the fol- 
lowing Poco Allegretto, which (in spite of its great simplicity)^ is 
stamped with a highly individual character by its constant alternation 
of iambic and trochaic rhythms. Further, Brahms contrived to make 
the concise threefold form of the work more effective by orchestrating 
the da capo of the first part in quite a different manner. Such a 
mixture of simplicity and refinement is characteristic of Brahms in his 
later years. The Finale is a tremendous conflict of elemental forces; 
it is only in the Coda that calm returns. Like a rainbow after a thun- 
derstorm, the motto, played by the flute, with its message of hope and 
freedom, spans the turmoil of the other voices." 

Walter Niemann stresses the major-minor character of the sym- 
phony, pointing how the F major of the first movement and the 
dominant C major of the second is modified to C minor in the third, 
and F minor in long portions of the Finale. This is the procedure by 

* P-A-F. "The best known of his germ-motiv^" (Robert Haven Schauffler : "■nie Unkn^^^^ 
Brahms"). 'Vas a development of his friend Joachim's personal motto J'-^'^-, ,[^^'AJ*°°'L 
toTFreiaber einsavt (Free but lonely), which young Johannes x»od^fied for h^^ own use 
into F-A-F, Frei aber froh (Free but glad). The apparent illogicality °J^ \^ %i^""J .^°"^ 
used to puke me. Why free but glad? Surely there should be no 'ifs' or ^^^s ^o *he happi 
ness conferred by freedom! Later, however, when I learned of Brahms peasant streak the 
reason forSe ^uf appeared. According to the Dithmarsh countijman's t^^^ft^^^jl ^°^^^lt? 
[ootfJee person withoa? fixed duties or an official position should ^^^^^^^f . ^^ ^^^^ef hfs 
feeUng that he is no better than a vagabond. Brahms the musician was able to conquer this 
conventional sense of inferiority, but Brahms the man — never. 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Gilman in the 
N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.00 per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Record Shop 

opposite "Tech" 

One of the largest stocks of 
records in New England. Rec- 
ords from over sixty American 
and foreign companies. Mail 
orders shipped anywhere. 

THE FISHER radio-phono- 
graph and Television — sole 
distributors. 

Ample parking space in rear 

90 A\ASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. Kl 7.66fi6 



[7] 




Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you 

a wealth of his greatest performances for encore after encore! 

Among them: 

# Symphony No. 9, in D Minor — Beethoven. With Frances Yeend, soprano; 
Eunice Alberts, contralto; David Lloyd, tenor; James Pease, boss; 

the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus, Robert Shaw directing, and the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. Album DM-n90, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor 
*Red Seal' De Luxe Records), $17. 

# Francesco da Rimini, Op. 32 — ^Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony 
Orchestra. Album DM-1179, $4.75. 

# Symphony No. 5, in B-Flat — Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Album DM-1215, $4.75. 

Prices include Federal excise tax and are subject to change without notice. 
(**DM" and ''DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extro.) 




The newest Crestwood Is everything you've wanted in a 
radio-phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out 
unit. Rich tone of the "Golden Throat." AM, short wave, 
FM radio. Plays up to 12 records automatically. 
"Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC. Victrolo 612V4. 
("Victrolo"— T.M. Reg. U.S. Pot. OfF.) 



[8] 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 



A 



A 





^h 



HAVE YOU HEARD THE RCA VICTOR SHOWl 
SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



was that the strange tone of the wind instruments was less pleasing 
than ours but that this was amply atoned for by the wonderful 
ensemble. 

Considering the tone of individual instruments, the French seem 
to cultivate a homogeneous manner of playing expressly designed for 
rendering French orchestral music. Their style and tone are strongly 
national. 

Debussy's colouristic or impressionistic use of wind requires tone 
colours as piquant, strongly characterised and as distinct from each 
other as possible. This is particularly noticeable in the lower wind. 
In French orchestras it is impossible to confuse the horns, with their 
bright globular sound, almost bell-like, with the bassoons, whose 
hoarse tones strangely resemble human speech, while their trombones 
make a thin shivering noise like a Wimshurst machine, (they use 
narrow bore trombones of the type known over here as peashoot- 
ers, and still, as in Berlioz' day, dispense with any form of Bass Trom- 
bone, which noble instrument contributes so much to the sonority of 
our own brass) . 

Hence, though we hear little about individual wind artists (with 
the notable exception of the Paris school of flute-playing), the Conser- 
vatoire orchestra playing Ravel, etc., is one of the richest treats con- 
temporary music has to offer. 

Comparing the French style with the German, which was heard here 
on several occasions before the war, we find that the latter is similarly 
bound up with the music of Wagner, Mahler, etc. It is perhaps because 
their phrases follow each other in a continuous melodic stream that 
German wind colours are more subtly diverse. 

Again considering the lower wind, horns, bassoons and trombones 
lack the bizarre and sharply contrasted hues of the French, and in- 



For Discriminating Theatre Goers 

^Boston Tributary Theatres 

Repertory Productions 

(A Friday and Saturday Evening Series) 

Oct. 8-9, "The Shoemaker's Holiday"; Oct. 15-16, "Ghosts"; Oct. 22-23, 
"Anna Christie" ; Oct. 29-30, "The Playboy of the Western World." 

Productions staged and lighted by ELIOT DUVEY 
Settings designed by MATT HORNER 

The Children's Theatre SERIES — Saturday Afternoons at 2:30 

Adele Thane, Director 

Oct. 2 — "Robin Hood" ; Oct. 16 — "The Emperor's New Clothes" 
Also Coming: "Tom Sawyer," "The Little Princess," "A Christmas Carol." 

Ticket Prices: 60c, 90c, $1.20, $1.80 (Tax IncL) Tel. Res. — COpley 7-0377 
Season Subscription Books : $4, $6, $8, $12 

All Performances at New I^ngland Mutual Hall 

[12] 



cline so much towards a universal round vocal tone that it is often 
quite easy to confuse them in the orchestra. Actual instruments show 
this characteristic developing early in the nineteenth century, though 
oboes appear at first sight to be exceptions. The French cultivated the 
smooth blending tone, and the Germans the shrill nasal tone. How- 
ever, surely enough Strauss, writing in 1905, strongly advocated the 
general adoption of the French style, while the Paris Conservatoire 
oboists now seem to produce the prominent "trumpet-like" tone to 
which Strauss objected in Germany. 

Through this, coupled wdth curiously instinctive mannerisms in 
articulation and phrasing, no orchestra can play Mahler or Strauss 
with quite such effect as one which speaks German. 

I did not hear the Czech orchestra which came here before the war, 
but their performances on records show yet another national charac- 
teristic, concerning style rather than tone (which resembles the Ger- 
man) . Dr. Burney having been "frequently told that the Bohemians 
were the most musical people of, perhaps all Europe," found on his 
visit in 1772 that children were taught music and instruments even 
in small village schools. He also noted that the Bohemians were "re- 
markably expert in the use of wind instruments in general." (A local 
informant told him that the Bohemians were most expert on the oboe 
and the Moravians on "tube or clarion") . 



Sanders Theatre . Cambridge 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Tuesday Evenings December /^, ^94^ 
at 8.30 o'clock 



['3 1 



The influence of such a background may be traced in the orches- 
tral works of Smetana and Dvorak. Just as their melody is largely in- 
spired by folk-music, so may the characteristically naive phrases they 
allot to wind instruments be the outcome of a folk-technique on 
band instruments. People brought up amongst domestic instrumental 
performance from their earliest intelligent years, come to relish the 
sound of each instrument in an intimate domestic way, and react with 
the strongest feelings to their simplest phrases. Thus it may be that 
Dvorak can luxuriate convincingly in obvious little fanfares and 
ingenuously simple utterances by wind instruments which would sound 
vilely corny in the works of composers of other nations, and which 
Czech musicians can render with a tenderness born of childhood 
affection. 

Proceeding now to the Amsterdam Orchestra, we noted that the 
wind players were eclectic with regard to tone (broadly speaking 
their upper woodwind resembled our own, the trumpets and trom- 
bones French, and the bassoons and horns German) and they had 
no quaint national style like the three schools mentioned above. But 
they urge us straight on to the question of ensemble. 

The whole point about precise ensemble is that without it music 
loses its rhythm and goes lame. Details like the following indicate 
the greatness of the Concertgebouw Orchestra. Beethoven's Eighth 
Symphony, ist movement, 2nd subject on wind in three octaves (flute, 
oboe, bassoon) ; all three players not only stressed the passage in ex- 
actly the same way, but also used the same vibrato, conferring on it 
a rhythmical lightness I have never heard before. Again, the Fantastic 
Symphony, Part IV (March) , 8th and 16th bars of the main tune; the 
brass end on a crochet which is usually played staccato by some in- 
struments and long by others at the same time. The whole Dutch brass 
played it long and I shall always remember the effect of it. 

[copyrighted] 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOUJ^S 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 
240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[14] 



MUSICAL PICTURES: SUITE FOR ORCHESTRA, from "The 
Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan/' Op, 57 

By Nicholas Andreievitch Rimsky-Korsakov 

Born at Tikhvin, in the government of Novgorod, March 18, 1844; died at 

St. Petersburg, June 21, 1908 



"The Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan, his Son the Renowned and Mighty Paladin, the 
Prince Guidon Saltanovich, and the Beautiful Tsarevna Lebed" (Swan) , an opera 
in four acts, was begun in 1899 and completed January 31, 1900. The opera 
was produced at a private performance in Moscow in 1900. A suite of "musical 
pictures" was performed at St. Petersburg at a concert of the Imperial Russian 
Musical Society shortly afterwards. The first movement and finale of the suite were 
performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, April 20, 1923. The "Flight of the 
Bumble Bee," a scherzo from the second act which was not published with the 
suite, was performed at these concerts October 24, 1924. The full suite with the 
"Flight of the Bumble Bee" included was performed December 22, 1932, and again 
on February 19, 1936, in commemoration of the centenary of Pushkin's death 
(February 10, 1836) . 

The suite is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, three 
clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and double bassoon, four horns, three trum- 
pets, three trombones and bass tuba, timpani, side drum, bass drum, cymbals, tri- 
angle, small bells, xylophone, celesta, harp and strings. Each movement quotes lines 
from Pushkin's poem, and is opened with a trumpet fanfare. 

PUSHKIN turned with increasing interest in the course of his brief 
career to simple folk fairy tales as poetic subjects. "In them," 
according to the new biography of the poet by Ernest J. Simmons, 
"he is entirely the creator. The story [''Tsar Saltan"] is borrowed, 
as Shakespeare might borrow the plot of a play, but the finished 
product becomes an original work of beauty. Pushkin had learned 
to move easily and surely in this world of complete fantasy. The 
artlessness of the folk is never subordinated to the sophisticated rules 
of art. Meaning, or understanding, or logic, is not allowed to obtrude 
upon the natural laws of folk tale narration. The story moves on, as 
it were, by its own volition. And Pushkin's recognition of this in- 
herent artlessness and his complete acceptance of it serve to make these 
folk tales his most perfect creations." 

Rimsky-Korsakov was fascinated by Pushkin's verses in the folk 
tale style. The fantastic prologue to Pushkin's Russian and Lud- 
milla" became the subject of his early 'Tairy Tales," and in the latter 
part of his career Vladimir Bielsky expanded both the "Tsar Saltan" 
and "The Golden Cock" to the proportions of a libretto for Rimsky- 
Korsakov's purposes in composing an opera on each of the two fairy 
tales. 

Rimsky-Korsakov composed "Tsar Saltan" with enthusiasm. He tells 

[15] 



us: "In the spring [1899], V. I. Bielsky began to write his splen- 
did libretto, making use of Pushkin as much as was possible, and 
artistically, as well as skillfully, imitating his style. He would hand 
me the scenes, one by one, as they were finished and I set to work on 
the opera. . . . The libretto came to me piecemeal continuously from 
Bielsky." The composer goes on to explain that in his vocal writing 
he carefully adapted to musical form the characteristic reiterated 
dialogue of the two wicked sisters, and the queen Barbarika, the sym- 
metry investing the piece with an intentionally fairy tale character. 
Instrumenfcally speaking, he made a fairly elaborate use of the system 
of leit-motives in this opera. He also explains how "out of the rather 
longish orchestral preludes to Acts I, II, and IV, I resolved to put 
together a suite under the title 'Little Pictures to the Fairy Tale of 
Tsar Saltan.' " 

The story tells of the handsome and fabulous Tsar Saltan who, 
going about his kingdom incognito, overhears three sisters discussing 
what each would do' for the Tsar were she to be his bride. The first 
would bake him fine bread, the second would weave him fine linen, 
the third and youngest would bear him a beautiful heir to the throne. 
The Tsar at once chose the youngest, but made the mistake of allow- 
ing the envious and disappointed sisters to dwell in his palace. The 
Tsaritsa bore him a beautiful son during his absence at the wars, 
but the two sisters, together with the plotting Barbarika, sent 
the king a false message to the effect that the heir was indeed no 
human child, but a monstrous creature in whom nature had no match. 
The Tsar refused to believe this message, and sent word that he was 
returning to see for himself, but again the plotters changed his mes- 
sage to a sentence that the mother and child should be inclosed in a 
barrel and cast upon the sea. For days the two were at the mercy of 
the waves, until the cask was stranded upon a strange shore, the island 
of Buyan. The boy grew daily in beauty and strength, and came to 
be called Prince Gvidon. He saved the life of a swan, which, in grati- 
tude, by its magic powers, endowed the island with three wonders. 
The first was a squirrel which whistled folk songs while nibbling nuts 
with golden shells, and extracting kernels of pure emerald. The sec- 
ond was a tempestuous sea which flooded the shore, bearing on its tide 
thirty-three warriors fully armed. The third was a princess as brilliant 
as the sun, whose tresses were illumined with moonbeams, and upon 
whose forehead burned a star. The Prince Gvidon, longing for his 
father, the Tsar, and wishing to entice him to the island, was trans- 
formed by the swan's power into a bumble-bee, and made his way to 
the Tsar's domain. When his mother's rivals, the baker, the weaver, 
and the Queen tried to distract the Tsar's attention by tales of these 
wonders elsewhere, the transformed prince flew into the face of the 
teller and spoiled their story. When the Queen attempted to describe 
the wondrous princess, Gvidon, as a bumble-bee, flew angrily at her. 

The Tsar at length sailed to the island of Buyan, and greeted his 

fair son and the princess, his bride, who was no other than the swan in 

transformed shape. , 

[copyrighted] 

[16] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SCHEDULE OF CONCERTS, Season 1948-1949 



OCTOBER 




18 


Cambridge 


(3) 


5 


Wellesley 




21-22 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XIII) 


8-^ 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. I) 


23 


Boston 


(Sun. d) 


12 


Boston 


(Tues. A) 


25 


Boston 


(Tues. F) 


15-16 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. II) 


28-29 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XIV) 


19 


Providence 


(1) 








22-23 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. Ill) 


FEBRUARY 




24 


Boston 


(Sun. a) 








26 


Cambridge 


(0 


1 


Providence 


(3) 


29-30 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. IV) 


4-5 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XV) 


J *J 






8 


Cambridge 


(4) 


NOVEMBER 




11-12 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XVI) 


2 


Boston 


(Tues. B) 


16 


New York 


(Wed. 3) 


5-€ 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. V) 


17 


Newark 


(0 


9 


New Haven 


(1) 


18 


Brooklyn 


(3) 


10 


Ne^v York 


(Wed. 1) 


19 


New York 


(Sat. 3) 


11 


Hunter College 




22 


Boston 


(Tues. G) 


12 


Brooklyn 


(1) 


25-26 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XVII) 


13 


New York 


(Sat. 1) 


27 


Boston 


(Sun. e> 


16 


Providence 


(2) 








19-20 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. VI) 


MARCH 






21 


Boston 


(Sun. b) 


1 


Providence 


(4) 


23 


Boston 


(Tues. C) 


4-5 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XVIII) 


26-27 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. VII) 


8 


Cambridge 


(5) 


30 


Pittsburgh 




11-12 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XIX) 


DECEMBER 




14 


Hartford 










1^ 


New Haven 


(2) 


1 


Cleveland 




16 


New York 


(Wed. 4) 


2 


Cincinnati 




17 


Newark 


(2) 


3 


Chicago 




18 


Brooklyn 


(4) 


5 


Milwaukee 




19 


New York 


(Sat. 4) 


6 


Ann Arbor 




22 


Boston 


(Tues. H) 


7 


Detroit 




25-26 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XX) 


8 


Rochester 




27 


Boston 


(Pension Fund) 


10-11 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. VIII) 


/ 

29 


Providence 


(5) 


14 


Cambridge 


(2) 




\*// 


17-18 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. IX) 


APRIL 






21 


Boston 


(Tues. D) 








22-23 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. X) 


1-2 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XXI) 


28 


Boston 


(Pension Fund) 


5 


Cambridge 


(6) 


31-Jan. 


1 Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XI) 


8-9 
12 


Boston 
Philadelphia 


(Fri.-Sat. XXII) 


JANUARY 




13 


New York 


(Wed. 5) 


2 


Boston 


(Sun. c) 


14 


New Brunswick 




4 


Boston 


(Tues. E) 


»5 


Brooklvn 


(5) 


7-8 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XII) 


16 


New York 


(Sat. 5) 


11 


Springfield 


\ / 


19 


lioston 


(Tues. I) 


12 


New York 


(Wed. 2) 


22-23 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat.XXIII) 


13 


Washington 




24 


lioston 


(Sun. f) 


»4 


Brooklyn 


(2) 


26 


Boston 


(Spec, concert) 


»5 


New York 


(Sat. 2) 


29-30 


Uoston 


(Fri.-Sat. XXIV) 




m^ 






laldluin 



'/^, 



The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — 'Mt is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 



THE BALDWIK PUP COMPANY 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON, HOWARD pianos and tke BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 




BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1 948- I 949 

Sanders Theatre, Cambridge \^^arvard University] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 
Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir ResnikoS 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 
Frank Zecchino 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 
Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 
Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 

Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhape 
Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 
Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 
George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 
Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 
Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 

Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 
E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Second Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, December 14 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 



The TRUSTEES of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallo well Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis \V. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 



George E. Judd, Manager 



[1] 



EMPLOYERS' GROIF 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYERS* Liability Auurmee Corporation Ltd. 
The EMPLOYERS' Fire Iiuurtmc* Compcaiy 
AMERICAif EMPLOYERS' /luunine* Componx 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from' 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 





Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[«] 



Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [Harvard Unwersity] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SECOND CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, December 14 

Program 

C. p. E. Bach Concerto in D major for Stringed Instruments 

(Arranged for Orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg) 
I. Allegro moderato 
II, Andante lento molto 
III. Allegro 

Irving Fine -» Toccata Concertante 

( Conducted by the composer) 

HoNEGGER Symphony for Strings 

I. Molto moderato 
II. Adagio mesto 
III. Vivace, non troppo 

INTERMISSION 

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68 

I. Un poco sostenuto; Allegro 

II. Andante sostenuto 

III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso 

IV. Adagio; Allegro non troppo, ma con brio 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 



[5] 




What finer gift this 
Christmas than a superb 

Fidelitone Phonograph 
Needle ... to gi\e 

countless hours of musical 
enjoyment to your friends. 

Fidelitone 

PHONOGRAPH NEEDLES 



a wide selection 

at your favorite 

record shop 
• • . up to ftt?e dollars 

PERMO, ^itcMfi^yiated 

Chicago 26 



KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY 
FUND ESTABLISHED 

The establishment of the Serge Kous- 
sevltzky Anniversary Fund of the Bos- 
ton Symphony Orchestra has been an- 
nounced by the Orchestra's Trustees. 
The sum asked is $250,000 for use 
without restrictions for cultural and edu- 
cational development by the Orchestra, 
and as a cushion against emergencies. It 
is to be a revolving fund in the sense 
that any withdrawals in any one year 
are to be restored as soon as practicable. 
The Trustees consider the Anniversary 
Fund as a prudent step in "long term 
planning." 

Henry B. Cabot, President of the 
Trustees^ has stated in a communica- 
tion to the Friends of the Orchestra: 
"For twenty-five years our Orchestra 
has been under the inspired directorship 
of Serge Koussevitzky. ... It is proper 
that we who enjoy the concerts of our 
Orchestra and take pride in its continu- 
ing success should seize this occasion 
to record in tangible form our apprecia- 
tion of Dr. Koussevitzky's magnificent 
contribution to the fame of our historic 
institution. It is hoped that many others 
will care to join us in paying tribute to 
a worthy conductor who has served us 
so long and with such integrity and de- 
votion. It is his desire that any such 
expression should take the form of a 
gift to the Orchestra." 

Dr. Koussevitzky, in a letter to Edward 
A. Taft, the chairman, has warmly en- 
dorsed this plan. See page 12 

All communications concerning the 
Fund should be sent to Mr. Edward A. 
Taft, Symphony Hall, Boston. 




[4] 



^^^P 



CONCERTO IN D MAJOR FOR STRINGS 
By Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach 

Born at Weimar, March 8, 1714; died at Hamburg, December 14, 17^ 

Arranged for orchestra by Maximilian Steinberg 

Born at Vilna, July 4, 1883 



Emanuel Bach composed this concerto for viols (with a concertino of quinton, 
viola d'amore, viola da gamba and basse da viole) . The date of composition is not 
ascertainable. The concerto was arranged by Maximilian Steinberg in 1909 for flute, 
two oboes (the second replaced in the slow movement by the English horn, 
labelled "oboe alto" in the score) , bassoon, horn and strings. 

DR. KoussEViTZKY became acquainted with this concerto as per- 
formed by the Society of Ancient Instruments in Paris, a set of 
viols then being used. It was at his suggestion that Maximilian Stein- 
berg made the present orchestral arrangement. 

Steinberg is known as Director of the Conservatory at Leningrad, 
in which position he succeeded Glazounov on the retirement of that 
musician. Steinberg received his musical education in this conserva- 
tory and studied under both Rimsky-Korsakov and Glazounov. He 
has composed a considerable amount of music, orchestral, vocal, 
chamber and for the stage. He married in 1908 the daughter of 
Rimsky-Korsakov; and it was for this occasion that Stravinsky, then 
a student at the Conservatory, composed his "Fireworks." 

Carl Philipp Emanuel Bach, second son of Maria Barbara, was 
prepared for a legal career and attended the Universities at Leipzig 
and at Frankfort-on-the-Oder. But a Bach was not easily weaned from 
the traditional profession of his kind. Though his father did not see 
fit to put this one among his numerous sons through an intensive 
musical preparation, the boy attended the Thomasschule at Leipzig 
and no doubt learned still more at home, where his receptive facul- 
ties were alert to the much music-making that went on there. Being 
left-handed, he could not have played a bowed instrument, but from 
childhood acquitted himself admirably upon the clavier or organ. 
It is told that at eleven he could glance over his father's shoulder and 
forthwith play the music he had seen. He composed profui-ely, even 
at this age. Completing his musical studies at Frankfort, he played 
for Friedrich Wilhelm I of Prussia as well as the Markgraf Friedrich 
Wilhelm, and had the reigning monarch been more musically inclined 
would probably have been installed as court musician. When the 
younger Friedrich succeeded his father in 1740 this musical enthusiast 
soon made the twenty-four-year-old Bach cembalist of the royal chapel. 

Emanuel Bach was never very contented with his position. Frederick 

[5l 



the Great, being -conservative in taste, favored the compositions of 
the brothers Graun in his court, and of Johann Joachim Quantz, his 
flute master, over the more daring and provocative concertos and 
sonatas of the Bach who was nevertheless by his wide repute a dis- 
tinct ornament to the royal retinue. Bach likewise found the endless 
necessity of accompanying his monarch's performances upon the flute 
burdensome. If Frederick, who was inclined to take liberties with 
tempo, imposed his kingly word upon questions of musical taste. Bach 
would stand staunchly for his rights. Karl Friedrich Fasch, his assistant, 
reported Bach's remark that "the King might be the autocrat of his 
kingdom, but enjoyed no prescriptive pre-eminence in the realm of 
art." 

Bach sought release from his position, to which as a Prussian sub- 
ject (by marriage) he was bound. In 1767, he was at last given his 
freedom, and was promptly appointed by the Princess Amalia, the 
King's sister-in-law at Hamburg, as her Kapellmeister. For twenty-one 
years, until his death at the age of seventy-five, Emanuel Bach played 
the clavier and the organ, composed voluminously, and went down 
into history as "the Hamburg Bach." 

Sebastian Bach's organ music, in Burney's opinion, courted "what 
was new and difficult, without the least attention to nature and 
facility." His vocal writing was "dry and labored," as compared to 
the "taste" his son displayed. The writer highly praised one of 
Emanuel's twenty-two settings of the "Passion," being apparently not 
even aware that the elder Bach had himself done something note- 
worthy in that line. Nor had he anything to say for the chamber 
music of the father, giving all his attention to the son's "more elegant 
and expressive compositions." 

Burney fully appreciated the importance of Emanuel Bach's in- 
novations. "If Haydn ever looked up to any great master as a model, 
it seems to have beenC. P. Em. Bach: the bold modulation, rests, 
pauses, free use of semitones, and unexpected flights of Haydn re- 
mind us frequently of Bach's early works more than of any other 
composer. . . . Em. Bach used to be censured for his extraneous 
modulation, crudities, and difficulties; but, like the hard words of 
Dr. Johnson, to which the public by degrees became reconciled, every 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

Four Year Degree Course Three Year Diploma Course 

Artist's Diploma One Year Preliminary Course Master's Degree 

Courses arranged for special students 

For further information, write the Dean 
290 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

[6] 



German composer takes the same liberties now as Bach, and every 
English writer uses Johnson's language with impunity." 

Emanuel Bach's plain leadership in the establishing of the sonata 
form is the more impressive when one notes the veneration in which 
he was held by his successors. Haydn deliberately devoted himself to 
the assimilation of his form, and Mozart acknowledged in the strong- 
est t^rms the value to posterity of his book, "Search Toward the 
True Method of Clavier Playing." There is no denying that he gave 
a great initial impulsion toward a fluent and rounded style of in- 
strumental manipulation and thematic development. He was one 
of those musicians who come at a moment when a new vista in 
music is due to be opened up; lacking perhaps greatness in the full 
sense, he yet possessed enough daring and adventure to reach intui- 
tively toward the new way which is in any case on the verge of dis- 
closure. Such a composer has shaken off the shackles of outworn tra- 
dition, but he has not the stature to create a new world for that he 
has rejected. He dreams and gropes, has recourse to the intuitive art 
of improvisation — that trancelike state of mind upon which com- 
posers once relied, but which is now lost to the world. Reichardt, 
who visited Emanuel Bach at Hamburg in 1774, observed him in the 
very act of improvisation: "Bach would become lost for hours in new 
ideas and a sea of fresh modulations. . . . His soul seemed absent 
from the earth. His eyes swam as though in some delicious dream. 
His lower lip drooped over his chin, his face and form bowed ai> 
parently lifeless over the keyboard." 

[copyrighted] 



BOUND VOLUMES »f the 
'Boston Symphony Orchestra 

Concert Bulletins 

Containing 
analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Oilman in the 
N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.00 per volume 

Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Record Shop 

opposite "Tech" 

One of the largest stocks of 
records in New England. Rec- 
ords from over sixty American 
and foreign companies. Mail 
orders shipped anywhere. 

THE FISHER radio-phono- 
graph and Television — sole 
distributors. . 

Ample parking space in rear 
90 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE? ^ 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. Kl 7.66a6 



[7] 




ojiimj 




# # 





Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bring you a wealth of their 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

# "Classical" Symphony in D, Op. 25 — Prokofieff. Serge Koussevifzky conducting 
Symphony Orchestra. DM-1241, $3.50. In manual sequence, $1 extra. 

# Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80 — Brahms. Serge Koussevitzky conducting the Ba 
Symphony Orchestra. 12-0377, $1.25. 

# The Donkey Serenade from "The Firefly" — FrimI, and Gypsy Love Song from "Tht 
— Herbert. James Melton, with the RCA Victor Orch., Frank Block, Cond. 10-1424,$! 

# Ave Maria — Scott-Schubert, and Serenade — Black-Schubert. James Melton, withthel 
Frank Black, Cond. 12-0153, $1.25. 
Prices include Federal excise tax and are subject to change without notice. 



The nev/est Crestwood is everything you've wanted in a radio- 
phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out unit. Rich 
tone of the "Golden Throat." AM, short wave, FM radio. Plays up to 
12 records automaHcally. "Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC 
Victrola 612V4. ("Victrolo"— T.M. Reg. U.S. Pot. Off.) 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 




[8] 



DUSSEVITZKY 



Teller" 
tor Orch., 




MELTON 



f 



Yc/Df?J&»^^ 



tf^b 



^A»D THE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 

f9l 



TOCCATA CONCERTANTE 

By Irving Fine 

Born in Boston, December 3, 1914 



The Toccata Conpertante, composed in the summer of 1947, is scored for two 
flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, two clarinets and bass clarinet, 
two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, and 
tuba, timpani, side drum, bass drum, cymbals, piano and strings. 

There is a dedication "To my wife." ^ 

THE following description of the score has been provided by the 
composer. 

"The word toccata is commonly used to describe improvisatory dis- 
play pieces for keyboard instruments. It has also been used in con- 
nection with concerted music of a fanfare-like character. It is in this 
latter sense that I have used the term. In writing this piece, I was 
aware of a certain affinity with the energetic music of the Baroque 
concertos. Hence the qualifying adjective, concertante. Moreover, this 
adjective seemed particularly appropriate because of the solistic nature 
of much of the orchestration, especially in the second theme group and 
closing sections of the exposition and recapitulation. 

The piece is roughly in sonata form. There is a short, fanfare-like 
introduction containing two motives which generate most of the sub- 
sequent thematic material. The following exposition contains a first 
section which makes prominent use of an ostinato and is rather in- 
determinate in tonality. A transitional theme, announced by the trum- 
pet and continued by the flute and bassoon, is abruptly terminated 
and followed by a second theme group, more lyrical in character. In 
this section the thematic material is chiefly entrusted to solo wind 
instruments supported by string accompaniment. The whole of the 
exposition is concluded by additional woodwind dialogue and scat- 
tered references to some of the preceding material. There are several 
episodes in the development, one of the most prominent being a fugato 
announced by the clarinets and based on the opening ostinato. There 
is no break between the development and recapitulation, the return 
of the first material commencing at the climax of the development. 
The second and closing sections of the exposition are recapitulated in 
.the main tonality without significant changes except for a few in in- 




TELEVISION PHONOGRAPH RECORDS 

COLUMBIA LONG PLAYING RECORDS 

AND PLAYER ATTACHMENTS 

Tfte Gramophone 

Monthly British Record Review 

126 MT. VERNON STREET. BOSTON. MASS. 

{footof Beacon Hill) 

CApitol 7-9840 



[10] 



strumentation and texture. The whole piece is rounded off by an 
extended coda. 

Irving Fine studied piano with Frances L. Grover, majored in music 
at Harvard University (A.B. 1937, A.M. 1938) where he studied theory 
and composition under Walter Piston, Edward Burlingame Hill, and 
A. Tillman Merritt. He continued his studies with Nadia Boulanger 
in Cambridge and France. For several years he was assistant conduc- 
tor of the Harvard Glee Club and Choir. At present he is Assistant 
Professor of Music at Harvard University. Since 1947 he has been a 
member of the faculty of the Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood. 

The following works have been published: Three Choruses from 
Alice in Wonderland (1943) ; A cantata — The Choral New Yorker 
(1944) ; Sonata for Violin a?id Piano (1946) ; and the Suite — Music 
for Piano (1947) . He has composed: Music for Modern Dance (1941) ; 
a Partita for Woodwind Quintet (1948) ; incidental music to Alice in 
Wonderland; and miscellaneous pieces for piano and voice. 

[copyrighted] 



SYMPHONY FOR STRING ORCHESTRA 

By Arthur Honegger 

Born at Le Havre, March 10, 1892 



The Symphonic pour Orchestra a Cordes is dated 1941. It was published in 1942 
with a dedication to Paul Sacher* and has been performed by him in Basel and 
other Swiss cities. The first American performance was by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra, December 27, 1946, Charles Munch conducting. Dr. Koussevitzky opened 
the 1947 Berkshire Festival with this Symphony on July 24, 1947, and conducted 
it in the Friday and Saturday series, October 31, November 1, 1947 and October 
8, 1948. 



* Paul Sacher is the conductor of the orchestra of the CoHegium Musicum Zurich, founded In 
1941. It was for him and his orchestra that Richard Strauss composed his recent 

* 'Metamorphoaen. " 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

J46 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singring by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 . Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
ANNIVERSARY FUND 

of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

The goal for this appeal, which will be the only 
appeal during this Anniversary Year, is $250,000 
net after all expenses of the Orchestra for the current 
year have been met. This sum is approximately four 
times as much as the amount contributed by the 
Friends of the Orchestra during the past season. 

All who care to join in honoring Dr. Koussevitzky 
on his twenty-fifth year of service in the only 
manner he wants are invited to enroll as Friends 
of the Orchestra and Contributors to the Serge 
Koussevitzky Fund. 

To enroll, simply send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston 15. "Big" gifts and 
small will be gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 

Gifts received to December 1 total $77,102. 
Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 

FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Edward A. Taft, Chairman 

KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

All gifts to the Orchestra are tax deductible. 



ri2] 



AT the end of the printed score is written, "Paris, October, 1941." 
XJl Willi Reich, writing from Basel for the Christian Science Monitor, 
May 19, 1945, remarked that the Symphony for Strings "embodies 
much of the mood of occupied Paris, to which the composer remained 
faithful under all difficulties." 

The first movement opens with an introductory Molto moderato, 
pp, with a viola figure and a premonition in the violins of things to 
come. The main Allegro brings full exposition and development. The 
introductory tempo and material returns in the course of the move- 
ment for development on its own account and again briefly before 
the end. 

The slow movement begins with a gentle accompaniment over which 
the violins set forth the melody proper. The discourse is intensified to 
ff, and gradually subsides. 

The finale, 6/8, starts off with a lively, rondo-like theme in duple 
rhythm, which is presently replaced by another in the rhythmic 
signature. The movement moves on a swift impulsion, passes through 
a tarantella phase, and attains a presto coda, wherein the composer 
introduces a chorale in an ad libitum trumpet part, doubling the first 
violins. (The choral theme is the composer's own.) 

M. Honegger Conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra as guest, 
January 11-12, 1929, presenting his Chant de Nigamon, Prayer 
of Judith from the Opera Judith, and three songs from La Petite 



Sanders Theatre . Cambridge 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

Tuesday Evenings yanuary 1 8^ ^949 
at 8.30 o'clock 

THOR JOHNSON Conducting 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge 
Koussevitzky conducting, are given each Monday, 1:30-2 WBZ, on 
the National Broadcasting Company Network. 



[»S] 



Sirene (Soloist — Cobina Wright) , Pastorale d'£.te, Horace Vic- 

torieux, Rugby, Piano Concertino (Soloist — Mme. Andree Vaurabourg 

Honegger), Pacific 2-^-1, 

Rugby (1928) approximates Pacific 2-^-1 as a musical depiction 

of human rather than mechanical energy. The Symphony for full 

orchestra, dedicated to the Koston Symphony Orchestra on its Fiftieth 

Anniversary, was composed in 1930 and performed here February 13, 

1931. His Mouvement Symphonique No. 3 was performed at these 

concerts November 3, 1933. He has since composed a Prelude, Arioso 

et Fughette sur le nom de Bach (1933) and a Nocturne (1939) and 

Symphonie Liturgique for Orchestra, two choral works in 1939: 

Nikolaus von der Flue (a Swiss national hero; this was performed 

in New York, May 8, 1941) and "Dance of Death" (after Holbein) , 

an opera — L'Aiglon (with Ibert, 1938), incidental music to Jeanne 

d'Arc au Bucher (Paul Claudel, 1938), the ballets Le Cantique des 

Cantiques (1938) , and The Call of the Mountain on an Alpine 

subject, produced in Paris in the summer of 1945. M. Honegger has 

completed his Fourth Symphony. He has composed numerous chamber 

works. 

[copyrighted] 



SYMPHONY IN C MINOR, NO. 1, Op. 68 

By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, '1897 



The First Symphony of Brahms had its initial performance November 4, 1876, 
at Carlsruhc, Otto Dessoff conducting. 

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings. 
The trombones are used only in the finale. 

THE known fact that Brahms made his first sketches for the sym- 
phony under the powerful impression of Beethoven's Ninth, which 
he had heard in Cologne for the first time in 1854, may have led his 
contemporaries to preconceive comparisons between the two. Walter 
Niemann, not without justice, finds a kinship between the First Sym- 

CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 
S40 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[14] 



phony and Beethoven's Fifth through their common tonality of C 
minor, which, says Niemann, meant to Brahms "hard, pitiless struggle, 
daemonic, supernatural shapes, sinister defiance, steely energy, drama- 
tic intensity of passion, darkly fantastic, grisly humor." He calls it 
"Brahms' Pathetic Symphony." 

The dark and sinister side of the C minor Symphony seems to have 
taken an unwarranted hold on the general consciousness when it was 
new. For a long while controversy about its essential character waxed 
hot after every performance. W. F. Apthorp bespoke one faction when 
he wrote in 1878 of the First Symphony that it "sounds for the most 
part morbid, strained and unnatural; most of it even ugly." Philip 
Hale, following this school of opinion, some years later indulged in a 
symbolic word picture, likening the symphony to a "dark forest" where 
"it seems that obscene, winged things listen and mock the lost." But 
Philip Hale perforce greatly modified his dislike of the music of 
Brahms as with the passage of years its oppressive aspects were somehow 
found no longer to exist. 

Instead of these not always helpful fantasies of earlier writers or a 
technical analysis of so familiar a subject, let us turn to the characteris- 
tic description by Lawrence Gilman, the musician who, when he 
touched upon the finer things in his art, could always be counted upon 
to impart his enthusiasm with apt imagery and quotation: 

The momentous opening of the Symphony (the beginning of an 
introduction of thirty-seven measures, Un poco sostenuto, 6-8) is one 
of the great exordiums of music — a majestic upward sweep of the 
strings against a phrase in contrary motion for the wind, with the 
basses and timpani reiterating a somberly persistent C. The following 
Allegro is among the most powerful of Brahms' symphonic move- 
ments. 

In the deeply probing slow movement we get the Brahms who is 
perhaps most to be treasured: the musical poet of long vistas and 
grave meditations. How richly individual in feeling and expression 
is the whole of this Andante sostenuto! No one but Brahms couJd 
have extracted the precise quality of emotion which issues from the 
simple and heartfelt theme for the strings, horns, and bassoon in the 
opening pages; and the lovely complement for the oboe is inimitable 
— a melodic invention of such enamouring beauty that it has lured 
an unchallengeably sober commentator into conferring upon it the 

JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 
256 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



[»5] 



attribute of "sublimity." Though perhaps "sublimity" — a shy bird, 
even on Olympus — is to be found not here, but elsewhere in this 
symphony. 

The third movement (the Poco allegretto e grazioso which takes the 
place of the customary Scherzo) is beguiling in its own special loveli- 
ness; but the chief glory of the symphony is the Finale. 

Here — if need be — is an appropriate resting-place for that diffi- 
dent eagle among epithets, sublimity. Here there are space and air 
and light to tempt its wings. The wonderful C major song of the 
horn in the slow introduction of this movement (Piii Andante, 4-4), 
heard through a vaporous tremolo of the muted strings above softly 
held trombone chords, persuaded William Foster Apthorp that the 
episode was suggested to Brahms by "the tones of the Alpine horn, 
as it awakens the echoes from mountain after mountain on some of 
the high passes in the Bernese Oberland." This passage is interrupted 
by a foreshadowing of the majestic chorale-like phrase for the trom- 
bones and bassoons which later, when it returns at the climax of the 
movement, takes the breath with its startling grandeur. And then 
comes the chief theme of the Allegro — that spacious and heartening 
melody which sweeps us onward to the culminating moment in the 
Finale: the apocalyptic vision of the chorale in the coda, which may 
recall to some the exalted prophecy of Jean Paul: "There will come 
a time when it shall be light; and when man shall awaken from 
his lofty dreams, and find his dreams still there, and that nothing has 
gone save his sleep." 

[COPYRIGHTF.rt] 



Bequests mad^ by will 
to the 

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

will help to 
perpetuate a great musical tradition. 

Such bequests are exempt from estate taxes. 



[16] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra serge koussevitzkv 

y £ »/ .M//jrr Director 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in I) iiuijor 

Bach, J. S Braiiflenl)iirjr Coiicortos No. 2, 3. 4. 5. 

Suites Xo. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Xos. 2. 3. 8. and \) : Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony. "Harold in Italy" (Trimrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture. "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Xos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifctzi. Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico." "Appalachian Sprint^." "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strinjjs 

Orieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto Xo. 12). Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Flanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto (Soloist: William Kapell) 

Lladov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 ("Italian") 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) : Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings ( E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kije," Suite : "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March ; "Peter and 
tne Wolf" ; "Romeo and Juliet." Suite ; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Cbout" 

Rachmaninoff "Tsle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloo." Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane. Rapsodie Espagnole. Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" : Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5: "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5: "Pohjola's Daughter"; 

"Tapiola"; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever." "Semper Fidells" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring." "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (SanromA): Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4. H. 0: Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 




Pal6tt>in 



The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — "It is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 



THE BiLDWini PliWO COMPAHY 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 







ili^ 




'% :^ 



BOSTON 
SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
I 948- 1 949 

Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [3^arva/'d University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 
PERSONNEL 
VioUNS Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 



Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 
Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladhnir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 

Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 

Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 
Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 
Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 

Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans W^emer 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhard t 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 



Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Filler 

Horns 
Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 

Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 

Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






i9^4\ACi949 



I* 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
. Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Third Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, January 18 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis \V. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



fi] 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
ANNIVERSARY FUND 

of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

The goal for this appeal, which will be the only 
appeal during this Anniversary Year, is $250,000 
net after all expenses of the Orchestra forthe current 
year have been met. This sum is approximately four 
times as much as the amount contributed by the 
Friends of the Orchestra during the past season. 

All who care to join in honoring Dr. Koussevitzky 
on his twenty-fifth year of service in the only 
manner he wants are invited to enroll as Friends 
of the Orchestra and Contributors to the Serge 
Koussevitzky Fund. 

To enroll, simply send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston 75. ''Big'' gifts and 
small will be gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 

Gifts received through January 12 total $121,833. 
Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 

FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Edward A. Taft, Chairman 

KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

All gifts to the Orchestra are tax deductible. 



[«] 



Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [Harvard University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



THIRD CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, January 18 



Program 

THOR JOHNSON Conducting 
Mozart Symphony in D major, "Haffner" (K. 385) 

I. Allegro con spirito 

II. Andante 

III. Menuetto 

IV. Finale: Presto 

Vaughan Williams "J^^" "~ ^ Masque for Dancing 

I. Introduction, Pastoral Dance, Satan's Appeal to God, Saraband of 

the Sons of God 
II. Satan's Dance of Triumph 

III. Minuet of the Sons and Daughters of Job 

IV. Job's Dream, Dance of Plague, Pestilence, Famine and Battle 

V. Dance of Job's Comforters, Elihu's Dance of Youth and Beauty, 
Pavane of the Sons of Morning 

INTERMISSION 

Smetana "Vltava" ("The Moldau"), Symphonic Poem 

Strauss Suite from "Der Rosenkavalier" 

{First performance at these concerts) 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 



[51 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelifone 1.25 

Fidelitone Deluxe.. 1.00 

Fidelitone Floating Point. 50c 

I CKIVlU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY MUSIC 
FOUNDATION 

1942: Nicolai Berezowsky — Symphony 

No. 4 
Benjamin Britten — Opera, "Peter 

Grimes" 
Samuel Barber — Composition (in 

preparation) 
Bohuslav Martinu — Symphony 
No. I 

1943: Bela Bartok — Concerto for Or- 
chestra 

Igor Stravinsky — Ode 

William Schuman — Symphony 
for Strings 

William Bergsma — Second String 
Quartet 

Robert Palmer — String Quartet 

1944: Darius Milhaud — Symphony 

No. 2 
Aaron Copland — Symphony No. 3 
Nikolai Lopatnikofi — Concertino 

for Orchestra 
Burrill Phillips — Overture for 

Orchestra, "Tom Paine" 

194S: Olivier Messiaen — Symphony 
(in preparation) 

Heitor Villa-Lobos — Madona 

Howard Hanson — Piano Con- 
certo 

Lukas Foss — Capriccio for 'Cello 
and Piano 

Alexei Haieff — Eclogue for 
'Cello and Piano 

David Diamond — Symphony 
No. 4 

Harold Shapero — Symphony (for 
Classical Orchestra) 

Nikolai Nabokov — "The Return 
of Pushkin" (Soprano and Or- 
chestra) 

1946: Walter Piston — Symphony No. 3 

Marc Blitzstein — "The Little 

Foxes," Opera (in preparation) 

1947: Roy Harris — Symphony (in 
preparation) 

Francesco Malipiero — Fourth 
Symphony 

Arnold Schonberg — composition 
for symphony orchestra, narra- 
tor and chorus, "Survivor from 
Warsaw" 

Bias Galindo — composition for 
instrument with piano (in prep- 
aration) 

Earl George — composition for 
instrument with piano (in prep- 
aration) Arioso (for 'Cello and 
Piano) 

1948: Randall Thompson — Symphony 
Arthur Honegger — Composition 
for Orchestra 



f4] 



THOR JOHNSON 

THOR Johnson, who is the conductor of the Cincinnati Symphony 
Orchestra, was born in Wisconsin Rapids, Wisconsin, June lo, 
1913, the son of the Rev. Herbert Bernhardt Johnson and the grand- 
son of a NorTvegian sea captain who had settled in that state. He gi'ew 
up in ^V^inston-Salem, North CaroHna, and attended the University 
of North CaroHna, winning his B. A. in music, and later a Master's 
degree in music at the University of Michigan. He was awarded the 
Beebe Foundation Scholarship in 1935 which allowed him two years 
in Europe. He studied at Salzburg with Felix Weingartner, Bruno 
Walter, and Nicolai Malko, and with Hermann Abendroth at the 
Leipzig Conservatory. Joining the faculty of the University of Michi- 
gan in 1938, he organized and conducted the Little Symphony of Ann 
Arbor. In the same summer he established and conducted the Ashe- 
ville Mozart Festival. For two years he conducted the Grand Rapids 
Symphony and the May Festival of the University at Ann Arbor. The 
summers of 1940 and 1941 he spent at the Berkshire Music Center in 
the conducting class of Serge Koussevitzky. He enlisted in the Army 
in 1942, and at Fort Monmouth, New Jersey, organized and con- 
ducted soldier symphony orchestras, going to England with the 
American University Symphony Orchestra. Returning to civilian status, 
he was appointed in the autumn of 1947 to his present post in 
Cincinnati. 



SYMPHONY IN D MAJOR f Haffner") , K. No. 385 
By Wolfgang Amadeus Mozart 

Born, at Salzburg, January 27, 1756; died at Vienna, December 5, 1791 



This symphony was composed in July, 1782 (as a serenade) , and shortly performed 
in Salzburg. The music in revised form was played at a concert given by Mozart in 
Vienna, March 22, 1783. 

It is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, 
two trumpets, timpani, and strings. 

"This symphony," wrote Philip Hale, "was played in Boston at concerts of the 
Orchestral Union, December 21, 1859, and May i, 1861. No doubt there were 
earlier performances." 

The "first performance at the concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra was 
on January 10, 1885. There were later performances in 1909, 1916, 1923 (Bruno 
Walter conducting) , 1926, January 20, 1933 (Albert Stoessel conducting) , January 
^3' '939 (Georges Enesco conducting), October 17, 1941, and December 21, 1945 
(Fritz Reiner). Bruno Walter conducted it at a Tuesday concert, March 18, 1947. 

SOMETIMES composers have by chance left a written record of their 
progress in the composing of a particular work, and the attendant 
circumstances. The information can be illuminating; in the case of the 
"Haffner" Symphony, as referred to in Mozart's letters to his father, 
it is astonishing. This important score, which succeeding generations 
have cherished as a little masterpiece in its kind, would appear to have 

[5l 



been the merest routine "job," undertaken grudgingly in a few hasty 
hours between more important matters. 

The "Haffner" Symphony is quite distinct from the Haffner Sere- 
nade, Avhich was ^\Titten six years before (1776) at Salzburg. Sigmund 
Haffner, a prosperous merchant and Bur germeister of the town, had 
commissioned the Serenade from the twenty-year-old Mozart for the 
^vedding of his daughter, Elizabeth. In July, 1782, Mozart in Vienna 
received from his father an urgent order for a new serenade to be 
hastily composed and dispatched to Salzburg for some festivity at the 
Haffner mansion. The commission was inconvenient. He was in the 
midst of re-aiTanging for wind instruments his latest opera, ''Die 
Entfilhrung aus dem Serail/' w^hich had been mounted on July 16. 
He was distracted, too, by the immediate prospect of his marriage with 
Constanze Weber. The domestic situation of Constanze had become 
impossible for iier. Mozart's father still withheld his consent. Mozart, 
aware of his family's obligations to the Haffners, anxious at the 
moment, no doubt, to propitiate his father, agreed to provide the 
required music. He \\Tote under date of July 20: 

"I have certainly enough to do, for by Sunday week my opera must 
be arranged for wind instruments, or someone else will get the start 
of me, and reap the profits; and now I have to write a new symphony 
[serenade]! How will it be possible! You would not believe how 
difficult it is to arrange a work like this for harmony, so that it may 
preserve its effects, and yet be suitable for wind instruments. Well, 
I must give up my nights to it, for it cannot be done any other way; 
and to you, my dear father, they shall be devoted. You shall certainly 
receive something every post-day, and I will work as quickly as pos- 
sible, short of sacrificing good writing to haste." 

Just a week later he had only the opening allegro ready: 



The Record Shop 

opposite "Tech" 

One of the largest stocks of 
records in New England. Rec- 
ords from over sixty American 
and foreign companies. Mail 
orders shipped anywhere. 

THE FISHER radio-phono- 
graph and Television — sole 
distributors. 

Ample parking space in rear 

90 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 

CAMBRIDGE, /AASS. Kl 7-6686 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John N. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Gilman in the 

N. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price $6.00 per volume 
Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



[6] 



"You will make a wry face when you see only the first allegro; but 
it could not be helped, for I was called upon to compose a Nacht 
Musique in great haste — but only for wind instruments, or else I 
could have used it for you. On Wednesday, the 31st, I will send the 
two minuets, the andante, and the last movement; if I can I will send 
a march also; if not, you must take that belonging to the Haffner 
music, which is very little known. I have wTitten it in D, because you 
prefer it." 

Another letter in the promised four days asked for further grace — 
the composer, with all his alacrity, was incapable of writing inferior 
music: 

"You see that my will is good, but if one cannot do a thing — why 
one cannot! I cannot slur over anything,* so it will be next post-day 
before I can send you the whole symphony. I could have sent you the 
last number, but I would rather send all together — that way the 
postage is less; extra postage has already cost me three gulden." 

Mozart was as good as his word. One week later, a bridegroom of 
three days, he dispatched the last item in fulfillment of his order: a 
new march movement. "I hope it will arrive in good time," he wTote 
(August 7) , "and that you will find it to your taste." 

Needing a new symphony for a concert which he gave in Vienna the 
following February, he thought of the serenade he had written for 
Salzburg five months before. He could easily transform it into a sym- 
phony by dropping the march and additional minuet, and adding two 
flutes and two clarinets to the opening movement and finale. He re- 
veals to us in his acknowledgment of the score, which his father sent 
him on request, that its writing must indeed have been as casual as 
the summer correspondence had implied: "The new Haffner Sym- 
phony has quite astonished me, for I did not remember a word of it 
['ich wusste kein Wort mehr davon'], and it must be very effective." 

The concert of March 22, 1783, is a conunentary upon the custom 

of the period. It included, besides this symphony, tvvo concertos in 

which the composer played, a Sinfonia Concertante, a symphony finale, 

an improvisation by Mozart, and, interspersed, four arias by various 

singers. 



*"Sie sehen dass der Willen gut ist ; aUein wenn man nicht kann, so kann man nicht! 
Ich mag nichts hinschmiren." 

[copyrighted] 



NEW ENGLAND GONSER\'ATORY OF MUSIC 

CONCERT BY CONSERVATORY ORCHESTR^A. 

Malcolm H. Holmes, Conductor 

and 

CONSERVATORY CHORUS 

Lorn A Cooke deVaro.n, Conductor 

BRUCKNER MASS IN E minor 
Jordan Hall, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, February 16 and 17 

at 8:15 p.m. 
Tickets for reserved floor seats free at Jordan Hall Box Office. 



[7] 





Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bn 
you a wealth of their greatest performances S 
encore after encore! Among them: 

• "Classical" Symphony in D, Op. 25 — Prokofieff. Treta 
Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-124l,Ji^ 

• Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80 — Brahms. Tne W 
Symphony Orchestra, Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. 12-03/ , 

THE WOR^ 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs through 
the ^'Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor '^Crestwood"! Hear 
your treasured recordings brilliantly reproduced! De luxe automatic record 
changer with ^'Silent Sapphire" permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short- 
wave radio. AC Victrola 8V151. ''Victrola"— T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 




HAVEYO. 



[8] 




WILLIAM KAPELL 



• Sonetto Del Petrarca, No. 104 — Liszt. William Kapell. Red 
S«ol Record 12-0342, $1.25. 

• Concerto for Piano and Orchestra (1936) — Khatchaturian. 
William Kapell, with the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge 
Koossevitzky, Cond. DM-1084, $6. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, 
eiclusive of local taxes. Prices of single records do not include Federal 
bcise tax. ("DM" albums olso ovailoble in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 

;:ATEST ARTISTS ARE |/M t 



J^ 



: THE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



[91 



JOB: A MASQUE FOR DANCING 

Founded on Blake's "Illustrations of the Book of Job' 

By Ralph Vaughan Whxiams 

Born at Down Amprey, England, October 12, 1872 



The music of "Job" was first performed in concert form at the Norwich (Eng- 
land) Festival of 1930. The first stage performance was given by the Camargo So- 
ciety at the Cambridge Theatre, London, in July, 1931, with the choreography by 
Ninette de Valois, setting and costumes by Gwendolen Raverat. Constant Lambert 
conducted. The first danced performance in America was at the Lewissohn Stadium 
in New York, August 24-26, 1931, by the Denishawn Dancers, including Ruth St. 
Denis and Ted Shawn. Hans Lange conducted. The first concert performance in 
this country was by the Philharmonic-Symphony Society of New York, John Bar- 
birolli, conductor, November 26, 1936. The complete work was introduced to 
Boston at these concerts January 25, 1946, Sir Adrian Boult conducting. 

"Job" is scored for three flutes, piccolo and bass flute, two oboes and English horn, 
two clarinets and bass clarinet, E-flat saxophone, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, 
four horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, two harps, organ, timpani, 
percussion (side drum, triangle, bass drum, cymbals, xylophone, glockenspiel, tam- 
tam) , and strings. 

The score is dedicated "To Adrian Boult." 

GEOFFREY Keynes, a specialist in William Blake, visualized that 
artist's series of engravings on the Book of Job as a subject for 
danced presentation. Together with Gwendolen Raverat, who de- 
signed the scenery and costumes, he drew up a scenario in nine scenes. 
To this Ninette de Valois contributed "an appropriate choreography 
in which Blake's static figures were, so to speak, dissolved into move- 
ments." Vaughan Williams provided music for the project, and 
called it a "masque for dancing." "His description of the work as 'a 
masque' has been called incorrect," so Lawrence Oilman pointed out 
in his notes for the New York Philharmonic performance, "but it is 
at least suggestive, and the basic designs of the music are the dance 
forms which belong to the period when the masque flourished in 
England. Thus there are a 'Saraband of the Sons of God,' a 'Minuet 
of the Sons of Job and their Wives,' a Tavane and Galliard of the 
Sons of the Morning.' " The annotator of the B. B. C. programs 



wadsworth provandie 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 

[10] 



remarks that "although set in nine scenes, the last of which is an 
epilogue, the music is not actually divided as that suggests; a num- 
ber of characteristic themes lend it something of symphonic connec- 
tion, which make it more appropriate for concert. performance than 
a good deal of music originally devised for ballets. Nor are the names 
of traditional dance movements used in it meant to suggest the old- 
world dances for which such music was once composed; something 
more in the character of English folk-dances is what the composer had 
in mind. In that way, the w^ork is much more closely akin to the old 
English masque of the seventeenth century than to such ballets as 
Diaghilev and his troupe accustomed us. Its subject is, however, more 
serious." 

The nine scenes are here reduced to five by the condensation of the 
last five into one. 

SCENE 1 

"Hast thou considered my servant Job?" 

Introduction (Largo sostenuto) 

Job and his family are sitting in quiet contentment surrounded by 
flocks and herds, as in Blake's Illustration I. Shepherds and husband- 
men cross the stage and pay Job homage. Everyone kneels. Angels 
appear at the side of the stage. All go off except Job and his wife. 

Pastoral Dance of Job's Sons and Daughters [Allegro piacevole) 

Satan enters and appeals to God. Heaven gradually opens and dis- 
plays God sitting in majesty, surrounded by the Sons of God (as in 
Blake's second engraving) . The line of Angels stretches from Earth 
to Heaven. 

Saraband of the Sons of God (Andante con moto) 

Introduced by sustained pianissimo chords, with rising arpeggios. 

All bow down in adoration. God arises in his majesty and beckons 
to Satan. Satan steps forward at God's command. A light falls on 
Job. God regards him with affection and says to Satan, "Hast thou 
considered my servant Job?" Satan says, "Put forth thy hand now and 
touch all that he hath, and he will curse thee to thy face." God says, 
"All that he hath is in thy power." Satan departs. The dance of 
homage begins again. God leaves his throne. The stage darkens. 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 
256 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYEHS* UabUity Aaunum Corporatiom Ltd. 
Tlie EMPIjOYERS' Fir* Imuinutce Company 
AMERICAN EMPLOTEB5' ImunMtm Camfumy 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back zind watch the flajnes when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year froitf 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls tham boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dauices in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being \)uilt today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create £in atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes cind jobs. 

Sincerely, 





Your local Employers' Group insurance agent, 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[12] 



SCENE 11 
''And Satan went out from the presence of the Lord." (Blake V.) 

Satan's Dance of Triumph (Presto) 

A diabolic "falling theme" (ff) is introduced over a bass pedal. 

The stage gTadually lightens. Heaven is empty, and God's throne 
vacant. Satan is alone. A light falls on him, standing at the bottom of 
the steps of Heaven. Satan ascends the steps. The hosts of Hell enter 
running, and kneel before him. Satan, in wild triumph, seats himself 
upon the throne of God. 

SCENE III 
"Then came a great wind and smote the four corners of the house 
and it fell upon the young men and they are dead." (Blake III.) 

Minuet of the Sons of Job and their \Vives (Andante con moto) 

Beginning with a pianissimo theme for oboe and flutes. 

Job's sons and their wives enter and dance. They hold golden 

wine-cups in their hands, which they clash. Satan enters from above. 

The dance stops suddenly. The dancers fall dead (Tableau as in 

Blake III) . 

SCENE IV 

"In thoughts from the visions of the night . . . fear came upon me 

and trembling." (Blake VI.) 

Job's Dream (Lento moderato — Allegro) 
The introduction is for strings, pianissimo. 
Job is lying asleep. Job moves uneasily in his slumbers. Satan en- 
ters. He stands over the prostrate Job and calls up terrifying Visions 



Sanders Theatre . Cambridge 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Tuesday Evenings February 8^ ^949 
at 8.30 o'clock 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Serge 
Koussevitzky conducting, are given each Monday, 1:30-2 WBZ, on 
the National Broadcasting Company Network. 

[ '3l 



of Plague, Pestilence, Famine, Murder, and Sudden Death, who pos- 
ture before Job. (See Blake's terrific Illustration XI.) The dancers, 
headed by Satan, make a ring around Job. The vision gradually dis- 
appears. (Scene V follows without a break.) 

SCENE V 

"There came a Messenger." (Blake IV.) 

SCENE VI 
''Behold, happy is the man whom God correcteth." 

Dance of Job's Comforters {Andante doloroso) 
Introduced by the diabolic theme of Scene II, but for strings, pizzicato. The 

saxophone makes its appearance. 

Satan introduces in turn Job's three Comforters (three wily hypo- 
crites) . Their dance is at first one of pretended sympathy, but de- 
velops into anger and reproach (Blake VII and X) . Job stands and 
curses God — "Let the day perish wherein I was born" (Blake VIII) . 
Heaven gradually becomes visible, showing mysterious figures, veiled 
and sinister, moving in a sort of parody of the Sons of God in Scene 
I. Heaven becomes brightly lighted, and the figures, throwing off 
their veils, display themselves as Satan enthroned, surrounded by the 
hosts of Hell. Satan stands. Job and his friends cower in terror. The 
vision gradually disappears. 

(Scene VII follows without a break.) 

SCENE VII 

Elihu's Dance of Youth and Beauty (Ajidante tranquillo — 

Allegretto) 
Introduced by a violin cadenza. 

Enter Elihu, a beautiful youth. "I am young, and ye are very old, 
wherefore I was afraid." (Blake XII.) 

Pavane of the Sons of the Morning (Andante con moto) 

(Blake XIV.) 

Soft, full chords, with harps, as the cadenza ends on a high note. 
Heaven gradually shines behind the stars. Dim figures are per- 
ceived, dancing a solemn dance. As Heaven grows lighter, they are 
seen to be the Sons of the Morning dancing before God's throne, 
"When the Morning Stars Sang Together, and all the Sons of God 
shouted for joy." 

[copyrighted] 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

Cm] 



SYMPHONIC POEM, VLTAVA ("The Moldac") 

By Bedrich (Friedrich) Smetaxa 

Born at Leitomischl, Bohemia, March 2, 1824; died at Prague, May 12, 1884 



The Symphonic Poem "The Moldau' was composed in November and December, 
1874. The first performance was at Zofin, April 4, 1875. The cycle of symphonic 
poems of which this was the second, and which was dedicated to Prague, was 
performed in that city for the benefit of the composer on November 5, 1882. The 
first performance of "The Moldau" at the concerts of the Boston Symphonv Or- 
chestra took place No\ ember 21, 1S90. 

"The Moldau"' is scored for two flutes and piccolo, t^vo oboes, two clarinets, 
two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass 
drum, cymbals, triangle, harp, and strings. 

npHE cycle of six symphonic poems, "Md Vlast" (My Countrv) , was 
-^ a consistent part of its composer's lifelong effort to establish an 
active musical culture in his country which should be in accord with 
the character and tradition of his people. Smetana's efforts in Prague 
in this direction had for a long time little recognition and little re- 
ward. Circumstances Tvere against him. His father, who "was a bre^ver 
in humble circumstances, opposed a career in so unpromising a field 
as music. The German language and culture was obligatory in 
Bohemia, and the cultivation of a truly Czechish music was difficult. 
He used his pen in the cause of musical advance at Prague, and later 
when his operas were performed, sometimes with indifferent success, 
the critics accused him of Wagnerian and other foreign influences. 

''Vltava" is known outside of Bohemia as "The Moldau," a name 
which derives from the Latin Multava. The following programme 
is printed as a preface to the score: 

Two springs pour forth their streams in the shade of the Bohemian 
forest, the one warm and gushing, the other cold and tranquil. Their 
weaves, joyfully flowing over their rocky beds, unite and sparkle in 
the morning sun. The forest brook, rushing on, becomes the River 
Moldau, which, with its waters speeding through Bohemia's valleys, 
grows into a mighty stream. It flows through dense woods from which 
come the joyous sounds of the chase, and the notes of the hunter's 
horn are heard ever nearer and nearer. 

It flows through emerald meadows and lowlands where a wedding 
feast is being celebrated with song and dancing. At night, in its 
shining waves, wood and water nymphs hold their revels, and in these 
waves are reflected many a fortress and castle — witnesses of bygone 
splendor of chivalry, and the vanished martial fame of days that are 
no more. At the rapids of St. John the stream speeds on, winding 
its way through cataracts and hewing the path for its foaming waters 
through the rocky chasm into the broad river bed, in which it flows 
on in majestic calm toward Prague, welcomed by time-honored 
Vysehrad, to disappear in the far distance from the poet's gaze. 

[copyrighted] 



SUITE FROM DER ROSENKAVALIER 
By Richard Strauss 

Born in Munich, June ii, 1864 

Der Rosenkavalier, Komodie fur Musik, text by Hugo von Hofmannsthal, was 
first produced in Dresden January 26, 1911. The first performance in America 
was given by the Metropolitan Opera Company in New York, December 9, 1913. 

The suite here performed ^vas made anonymously for its publisher, Boosey & 
Hawkes, and was first played by the New York Philharmonic-Symphony Society, 
Artur Rodzinski, conductor, October 5, 1944. 

SHORTLY after the first production of Elektra in 1909, Strauss let it 
be known that he was collaborating once more with von Hof- 
mannsthal. The new opera was composed with great eagerness as 
Strauss received the pages of the libretto piecemeal, begun May 1, 1909, 
four months after the production of Elektra, and completed Septem- 
ber 26, 1910. His statement that he was "writing a Mozart opera" was 
taken as a presumptuous claim to immortal company by a composer 
already regarded as outrageously impudent. But the fact that the 
authors of the stark pages of Elektra were about to produce a comedy 
actually including waltzes was calculated to pique the public curiosity. 
When Der Rosenkavalier (or Der Ochs von Lerchenau, as Strauss had 
first intended to call it) was first produced in various Central European 
cities there were official censorial objections which, however, neither 
prevented performances with text untouched nor kept audiences away. 
When the opera made its way to New York two years later, H. E. 
Krehbiel bespoke a considerable critical opinion when he objected 
to the opera's loose moral tone and its use of Viennese waltzes in the 
supposed era of Maria Theresa. He may have forgotten that Mozart's 
Count Almaviva in Figaro, not only set but written in that period, 
had in Strauss's Baron Ochs a close companion in lechery who was 
similarly brought to ridicule by his superiors in intrigue. Also that 
Se vuol ballare in that opera proves in itself that waltzes were not 
unknown. That anyone could be troubled by morals and anachronisms 
in Strauss's delightful (and suitably frivolous) operatic confection 
reads curiously in this thirty-eighth year of the still lusty existence of 
Der Rosenkavalier. If a purist like Paul Henry Lang draws aloof 
from Der Rosenkavalier as "Mozart and Johann Strauss rouged and 
lipsticked," there are those of us who gladly subject themselves to 
the charms of the score and forgive its composer his liberties with 
history — if they notice them at all. 

The present suite includes in instrumental form the introduction 
to the first act, the music that accompanies Octavian's entrance bear- 
ing the silver rose in the second act, the duet between Sophie and 
Octavian later in that act, the principal waltz associated with Baron 
Ochs, the trio sung by Sophie, the Marschallin, and Octavian. and 

the duet of the young lovers. 

[copyrighted] 

[16] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^^^\f°^Dif^7,V'^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S. Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4. 5. 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Xos. 2. 3. 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Xos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico." "Appalachian Spring." "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto No. 12), Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto (Soloist : William Kapell » 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) : E-flat (184) : C major 

(338) : Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofiefif Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf"; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole. Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 : "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidells" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring." "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (SanromS) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5. 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 



mmrzKY 




laliiuim 



The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — "It is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIN PIANO COHPANV 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC. HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and the BAWWIN ElECTRDNIC ORGAN 



5il 



^:cM 






\ 



4 



(f^ 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 






%. 



7 



\9 



C\s 



y 



^ — 



r 



H 



#j 



<-:£> 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
1948- 1949 

Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [harvard University] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 
Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 
Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap6 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 
Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 
John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 
Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren6 Voisin 

Trombones 

Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John CofEey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stemburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






i9^4\\Ci949 



I* 
SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fourth Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, February 8 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 



The TRUSTEES of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

[erome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 



George E. Judd, Manager 



[»] 



FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA - 
ANNUAL MEETING 



To those interested in contributing to the 
Serge Koussevitzky Anniversary Fund it is an- 
nounced that a gift to the Orchestra carries the 
privilege of attending the Annual Meeting of the 
Society of Friends of the Orchestra which this year 
will be held at Symphony Hall on Wednesday, 
March 2nd, at four o'clock. 

A special program has been arranged by 
Dr. Koussevitzky to follow the meeting, and at 
the conclusion of the music the Trustees and 
Dr. Koussevitzky will receive our members at tea 

in the upper foyer. 

Gifts to the Anniversary Fund will constitute 
enrollment in the Society for the current season. 
Checks may be drawn payable to Boston Symphony 
Orchestra and may be mailed to Fund Headquarters 
at Symphony Hall, Boston 75. Such gifts are tax 
deductible. 

» Edward A. Taft 

Chairman, Anniversary Fund 



l»] 



Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [Harvard University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Stravinsky 



FOURTH CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, February 8 



Program 

IGOR STRAVINSKY Conducting 

Ode in Three Parts, for Orchestra 
Eulogy 
Eclogue 
Epitaph 

Capriccio, for Orchestra with Piano Solo 
I. Presto 

II. Andante rapsodico 
III. Allegro capriccioso, ma tempo giusto 
(Played without pause) 

INTERMISSION 

Concerto in D for String Orchestra 
I, Vivace * 

II. Arioso: Andantino 
III. Rondo: Allegro 

(First performance at these concerts) 

Divertimento from "Le Baiser de la Fee," Allegorical 

Ballet 
I. Sinfonia 
II. Danses Suisses: Valse 

III. Scherzo 

IV. Pas de deux 

Adagio — V^ariation — Coda 



SOLOIST 



SOULIMA STRAVINSKY 



BALDWIN PIANO 



VICTOR RECORDS 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A rULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelifone Moster 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1.25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1.00 

Fidelitone Flooting Point. 50c 

I CKIVlU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY BASS 
RECORDS 

Among the many reviews of the new 
album of double bass recordings by 
Serge Koussevitzky, the following are 
quoted: 

Claudia Cassidy (in the Chicago 
Tribune) : 

"Collectors in search of Serge Kous- 
sevitzky's double bass recordings are 
being rescued by a series of circum- 
stances. Perhaps you remember that 
when Boston asked its renowned con- 
ductor what he wanted in token of ad- 
miration and affection in the 25th and 
farewell season, he said he wanted "a 
big gift" for his orchestra. That gift 
was a backlog of financial security, and 
the fast growing Serge Koussevitzky 
Anniversary fund is the result. To 
augment it, a limited edition of 1,000 
albums of Koussevitzky recordings has 
been made available by the Boston or- 
chestra in cooperation with RCA Victor. 
Each is autographed, holds the portrait 
of the player with his instrument now 
hanging in Koussevitzky's Tanglewood 
home, and features three 12-inch, ruby 
vinylite records of the slow movement 
from Koussevitzky's double bass con- 
certo, his Chanson Triste and Valse 
Miniature, and his arrangement of a 
largo by Eccles, plus a lullaby by Laska. 
The recordings were made in 1929, and 
you have to hear what they can do with 
the double bass to believe it. Pierre 
Luboshutz is the accompanist. The price 
is $10, including mailing costs. Address 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Sym- 
phony Hall, Boston 15." 

Jay C. Rosenfeld (in the Berkshire 
Eagle) : 

"Immediately discernible are the at- 
tributes which make orchestral music 
under his direction so absorbing; a 
magnificent conception of line, a con- 
tinuously glowing tone and the peerless 
faculty of maintaining and re-instilling 
vigorous urgency in the music. Except 
for a propensity to make his shifts and 
slides very noticeable, the mechanics 
of the playing are formidable. His in- 
tonation has the character associated 
with Casals and Heifetz, the tone has 
a vivid warmth and the bowing the un- 
canny amplitude of those masters who 
know the secret of preserving intensity 
without expending all their resources. 



r4] 



"ODE," IN Three Parts for Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, June 17, 1882 



The Ode was composed for the Koussevitzky Music Foundation. Inc., and is dedi- 
cated to the memory of Mme. Natalie Koussevitzk). It was first performed bv the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, October 8, 1943. 

It is scored for t^\o flutes and piccolo, t^\o oboes, two clarinets, two l^assoons, 
four horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. 

THE composer has provided this explanation: "I was asked by the 
Koussevitzky Music Foundation to compose a symphonic piece 
which I have called 'Ode.' The Ode is a chant in three parts for 
orchestra. It is an appreciation of Natalie Koussevitzky 's spiritual con- 
tribution to the art of the eminent conductor, her husband, Dr. Serge 
Koussevitzky. 

'Tart I. 'Eulogy,' praise, a song in sustained melody with accom- 
paniment, the whole in fugal treatment. 

'Tart II. 'Eclogue,' a piece in lively mood, a kind of concert 
champetre, suggesting out-of-door music, an idea cherished by Nat- 
alie Koussevitzky and brilliantly materialized at Tangle-^sood by her 
husband. 

"Part III. 'Epitaph,' an inscription, serein air, closes this memorial 

triptych." 

[copyrighted] 



CAPRICCIO FOR PIANO AND ORCHESTRA 
By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, June 17, 1SS2 



Stravinsky began to compose his Capriccio at Christmas of 1928 and completed 
it by the end of September 1929. The first performance ^\as at a concert of the 
Orchestre Symphonique cle Paris, on December 6 following, Ansermet conducting, 
and the composer playing the piano solo. The first performance in America was 
at a concert of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, December 19. 1930, Jesus Maria 
Sanroma taking the piano part. The same Orchestra and soloist introduced the 
work to New York, February 7, 1931, and repeated it in Boston, under the com- 
poser's direction, December 1, 1939. 

The orchestration is as follows: wood winds in threes, four horns, two trumpets, 
three trombones and tuba, timpani, and strings. 

Stravinsky, appearing as piano soloist in various European cities, 
decided that it would be advisable to have another work of his 
own than the Piano Concerto, which he had performed innumerable 
times. "That is why I wrote another concerto," he tells us in his auto- 

[5] 



biography, "which I called 'Capriccio' that name seeming to indicate 
best the character of the music. I had in mind the definition of a 
capriccio given by Praetorius, the celebrated musical authority of the 
seventeenth century.* He regarded it as a synonym of the fantasia, 
which was a free form made up of fugato instrumental passages. This 
form enabled me to develop my music by the juxtaposition of episodes 
of various kinds which follow one another and by their very nature 
give the piece that aspect of caprice from which it takes its name. 

"There is little wonder that, while working at my Capriccio, I 
should find my thoughts dominated by that prince of music, Carl 
Maria von Weber, whose genius admirably lent itself to this manner. 
Alas! no one thought of calling him a prince in his lifetime!" 

The composer uses the solo string quartet, but merely as a part of 
the accompanying orchestra. "The name Capriccio," writes the pro- 
gram annotator for the B. B. C. Concerts in London, "of course 
allows a composer a good deal of freedom, but this work has, none 
the less, a formality of its own, consistently designed. Each movement 
has its own motive, and they are bound together in a certain unity. 
The characteristic theme of the Capriccio is the arpeggio of G minor, 
played marcato but not forte, by the pianoforte with a rhythmic sup- 
port from timpani, near the beginning of the first movement. It 
decides the character of th6 first movement, and gives birth to a num- 
ber of the succeeding themes, built up somewhat on the plan of an 
overture. It is preceded by an Introduction interchanging between 
Presto and Doppio movimento (used here to mean twice as slow, not 
twice as fast) , and the Introduction is brought in again to form the 
close of the movement. The Presto depends largely for its effect on 
trills, with rushing scales in the orchestral strings, and the Doppio 
movimento has a theme for the string quartet. The main body of the 
movement never slackens speed, from the arpeggio figure with which 
the soloist begins until the introduction returns at the end. Concise in 
itself, it makes use for the most part of short themes, several of them 
clearly akin to that arpeggio motive. 

"Rapsodico gives the clue to the second movement, and in it, the 
idea of a capriccio is most clearly realized. It begins with a dialogue 
between the soloist and the wood winds, and the texture is slighter 
than in the first movement: except for one or two short passages, the 
string quartet has no separate existence apart from the strings as a 
whole. The pianoforte closes the movement with a cadenza, lightly 
accompanied in its last three bars. The capricious character of the 
piece is clearly foreshadowed by the soloist's opening. 

"The movement leads straight into the last, a moto perpetuo, based 
largely on an insistent arpeggio of G major, and the two chief sub- 
jects built up above it have something of the character of the subject 
and counter-subject of a fugue. And their reappearances, interchanged 
between soloist and orchestra, may remind the listener of rondo form." 



* Not the "eighteenth century," as erroneously quoted in the English translation. 

[copyrighted] 
[6] 



SOULLMA STILWINSKY 

SouLiMA Stravinsky was born at Lausanne, Switzerland, in 1910, the 
year The Fire Bird was composed. He has been the pupil of Isidor 
Philipp and Nadia Boulanger. He made his debut as a pianist at the 
age of twenty in a concert tour of France and Switzerland. In 1934 he 
appeared in Paris, playing both the Concerto with AVind Instruments, 
and the Capriccio of Stravinsky, while his father conducted. Touring 
Avith his father, he has also played with him in the Concerto for Two 
Pianofortes. He gave a recital in Los Angeles last September. 



CONCERTO IN D for String Orchestra 
By Igor Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, June 17, 1882 



The score is signed "Holh-^vood, August 8, 1946," and "vvas first performed by 
Paul Sacher* and the Chamber Orchestra of Basel, January 21, 1947. It is dedi- 
cated to this orchestra and its leader. The piece ^\'as introduced in this country 
by Fritz Reiner, conducting the Pittsburgh Orchestra, January- 16, 1948. It has 
been performed in San Francisco and Mexico City under the composer's direction, 
and by the New York Philharmonic Symphony Society under the direction of 
Leopold Stokowski. 

STRAVINSKY, ^sTitiug to Sachcr and attempting to describe the music, 
was at a loss to provide helpful verbal information about ^vhat 
may easily be perceived in the music itself. Neverthless, it can be 

* Works composed for Paul Sacher and his orchestra include Arthur Honegger's Symphony 
for Strings, Martinu's Toccata and Two Canzone, Strauss's Metamorphoseon, Martin's 
Petite Symphonie Concertante, of which all but the second have been performed at Boston 
Symphony concerts. 



BOUND VOLUMES of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 
Concert Bulletins 

Containing 

analytical and descriptive notes by Mr. 
John X. Burk, on all works performed 
during the season. 

"A Musical Education in One Volume" 
"Boston's Remarkable Book of Knowl- 
edge" 

Lawrence Gilman in the 
iV. Y. Herald and Tribune 

Price S6.00 per volume 
Address, SYMPHONY HALL, 

BOSTON, MASS. 



The Record Shop 

opposite "Tech" 

One of the largest stocks of 
records in New England. Rec- 
ords from over sixty American 
and foreign companies Mail 
orders shipped anywhere. 

THE FISHER radio-phono- 
graph and Television — sole 
distributors. 

Ample parking space in rear 

90 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 

CAMBRIDGE, MASS. Kl 7-66e6 



[7] 




■ v,~,^s'r!^^ 




Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, the 
you wealth of their greatest performana. 
encore after encore! Among them: 

• Divertimento — Stravinsky. Igor Stravinsky condu: 
RCA Victor Symphony Orchestro. Album DM-1202, $4.'. 

• Danses Concertantes — Stravinsky. Igor Stravinsky ' 
ing the RCA Victor Chamber Orchestra and the RC- 
Symphony Orchestra. Album DM-1234, $4.75. 

THE WORID'5' 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs through 
the "Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor "Crestwood"! Hear 
your treasured recordings brilliantly reproduced! De luxe automatic recv,rd 
changer with "Silent Sapphire" permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, shortv/ave 
radio. AC Victrola 8V151. "Victrola"— T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat! OfT. 




HAVE YC 



[8] 



i 




ithj 



mPj'-' 



FERRUCCIO TAGLIAVINI 



• Operatic Arias. Album includes: Pormi veder le logrime 
ho*n "Rigoletto" — Verdi, Una furtiva logrima "L'Elisir 
d'amore" — Donizetti, Lamento di Federico from "L'Arlesiana" 
— Cileo, and O Paradise from "L'Africana" — Meyerbeer. 
Ferruccio Togliovini, with tfie RCA Victor Orch. Antal Dorati, 
Cond. MO-1191, $3.50; VO-13 (RCA Victor 'Red Seal' De Luxe 
lecordi) $5. 

All pficej ore suggested list, subject to change without notice, 

tiduiive of locol foxes. Prices of single records do not include Federal 

' w fox. ("DM" olbums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



>TE5T ARTISTS ARE 



Ov 



C THE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? SUNDAY A F T E R t-J O O N S OVER NBC 



*^fc 



f9] 



pointed out that in the first movement, a Vivace in 6/8 rhythm, the 
strings are divided in the development. The solo viola and violin are 
set against the orchestral body. This movement is the longest. The 
second, an arioso andantino, 4/4, consists of only forty-three bars. 
The final rondo allegro continues in the concerto grosso style upon 
which the whole work is based. 

Remarks about the Concerto by Charles Stuart (in Tempo, sum- 
mer, 1948) are a retort to critical reviews which the piece encountered 
in London: 

"The salient quality of the Concerto in D is its unity in variety, 
the way in which its disparate bits and pieces key into each other, 
forming a valid whole. It is true that Stravinsky picks up one musical 
idea, puts it down and picks up another. This practice has been 
cited recently as a proof of his musical impotence. It happens to be 
the practice also of Bach, Mozart and the Irreproachables generally. It 
happens to be the way in which all good music is written. 

" 'But,' objects the critic, 'the successive or alternating ideas of 
Bach and Mozart fit together and make a pattern. Those of Stravin- 
sky don't.' 

"To people with a deaf spot for Stravinsky's harmonic and rhythmic 
idioms, every page the man writes must of necessity be meaningless. 
It is the deaf spot that is to blame, not Stravinsky. Let me say in 
passing that nothing gives a musician more pride and pleasure than 
his deaf spots. He cultivates them anxiously. He is virtuous about 
them. They are his solace and cherished asset. It is so elating to be 
dogmatic and damnatory about music you never really hear and can 
never hope to understand. 

"But for some of us, whose ears in this matter are unspotted and 
whole, the Stravinsky idiom, his bar-to-bar texture, the 'feel' of his 
orchestration, the tension and tang of his part-writing, are matters 
of beauty in their own right. And to our way of thinking the musical 
ideas in the average Stravinsky piece are logically sequent and 
cohesive. 

"Which brings me back to the Concerto in D. The scudding, busy 
finale (a Rondo in name though not conspicuously by nature) is 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

CONCERT BY CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA 

Malcolm H. Holmes, Conductor 

and 

CONSERVATORY CHORUS 

LoRNA Cooke deVaron, Conductor 

BRUCKNER MASS IN E minor 

Jordan Hall, Wednesday and Thursday evenings, February 16 and 17 

at 8:15 p.m. 
Tickets for reserved floor seats free at Jordan Hall Box Ofl&ce. 



[lO] 



a cogent reply to 'the opening Vivace, a quick movement of quite 
different cut and purport; and the elegant middle movement (Arioso) 
replies with equal cogency to both. The Vivace is structurally the 
most complex movement of the three. No doubt the Deaf Spots are 
bewildered here by the moderato middle section. From the chatter and 
flow of innocent 6/8 triplets we plunge into a shadowed half-w^orld 
of syncopation, the harmonies tart yet not without perfume. This 
episode is not only exciting in its own terms: it is also complementary, 
a signal proof of precisely that architectonic faculty which Stravinsky 
has been declared to lack." 

[copyrightfpI 



Dr'ertimento from ''LE BAISER DE LA F£E' 
("THE FAIRY'S KISS"), 

Allegorical Ballet in Four Scenes 

By Igor Fedorovitch Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, on June 17, 1882 



In 1928, Stravinsky composed for Ida Rubinstein "Le Baiser de la Fee, Ballet- 
allegorie en 4 Tableaux." It was performed under the composer's direction at the 
Opera in Paris, on November 27, and repeated on December 4. The ballet was 
mounted at the Theatre de la Monnaie in Brussels, and at Monte Carlo; also at La 
Scala in Milan, all in the same season, for the company of Mme. Rubinstein. Later it 
was studied anew by Mme. Xijinska, and produced at the Colon Theatre in Buenos- 
Aires, where other of Stravinsky's works have been performed. 

The suite was played under his direction in November, 1928, by the then newly 
formed Orchestre Symphonique de Paris at the Theatre des Champs Elysees. Visit- 
ing America, Mr. Stravinsky conducted the suite at a concert by the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra in Sanders Theatre, Cambridge, on March 14, 1935. It was per- 
formed in Boston under the direction of Dr. Koussevitzkv, October 30, 1936. 

The suite is scored for three flutes and piccolo, two oboes, English horn, three 
clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons, four horns, three trumpets, three trom- 
bones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, harp, and strings. 

THE composer made his orchestral suite from the ballet 'Vithout 
great difficulty," as he himself has wTitten, "on account of its 
straightforward plan." Stravinsky expresses his pleasure in conduct- 
ing this music in that it embodies a method of orchestral ^\Titing ne"\v 
to him, and easily conveyed to its audience in a first hearing. 



wadsworth provandie 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

846 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



^EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
^ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




Tlia EM PLOYEBS' UmUUiy Aumrmea Corperutitm J 
■n* EMPtOYERS' Fin Imttumtm Om^may 
AMERICAN EMPLOYXBS' Imtamtm CMyMgr 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . .and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 





7</i 

Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 

THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[i«] 



Stravinsky dedicates the piece "To the muse of Tchaikovsky," and 
further explains on his score: "I dedicate this ballet to the memory of 
Peter (Pierre) Tchaikovsky, identifying his music with the Fairy, and 
it is from this fact that the ballet becomes an allegory. His genius has 
in like degree marked the score with a destined kiss — a mystic influence 
which bespeaks the whole work of the great artist." Herbert Fleischer 
further particularized this curious alliance {Russischer Musik Ver- 
lag, Berlin, 1931) : "Stravinsky takes as the basis of the composition 
the melodies and characteristic turns of expression of Tchaikovsky. 
He removes the often too sweet and rather feminine meltingness of 
Tchaikovsky's melos. He recasts the tones of the master, so reverenced 
by him, in his own rigid tonal language. Yet the lyrical tenderness of 
Tchaikovsky's melos is not lost. 

"Tchaikovsky's 'Wiegenlied im Sturm' constitutes the funda- 
mental motive of the ballet. With it, it begins, and with it, it ends. 
From the succession of Tchaikovskyan melodies that have been drawn 
upon, of most importance are the Humoresque for piano — used in 
the splendidly colored material of the second tableau; in the same 
scene, the melody of the waltz 'Natha' [from the Piano Suite, Op. 51], 
and the piano piece 'The Peasant Plays the Harmonica' from the 
'Children's Album.' " 

Stravinsky, on an introductory page of his score, finds four lines 
sufficient to give the plot of his ballet: "A Fairy has marked with her 
mysterious kiss a young man in his childhood. She withdraws s him from 



Sanders Theatre . Cambridge 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Tuesday Evenings (^March c?, 1 9 49 
at 8.30 o'clock 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are given 
each Monday, 1:30-2 WBZ, on the National Broadcasting Company 
Network. 



[ '.^ 1 



life on the day of his greatest happiness to possess him and thus pre- 
serve this happiness forever. Again she gives him the kiss." 

The indications in the score will give a more detailed idea of the 
action: 

I. Prologue (^Storm Lullaby) 

(Andante) — A woman carrying her child proceeds through the storm — 
The fairy spirits appear. 

(Allegro) — The spirits pursue the woman — They separate her from her 
child, and carry him off — Appearance of the Fairy — She approaches 
the child — She surrounds him with tenderness — She kisses his fore- 
head and vanishes, leaving him alone on the stage. 

(Vivace) — Passing peasants find the child abandoned, seek vainly for his 
mother, and anxiously take him off. 

II. A Village Fair 

(Tempo giusto) — Peasants dance, musicians play; the young inan and his 
betrothed dance with the rest (Valse, poco piu lento) — The musicians 
and the crowd go off; the betrothed leaves the young man all alone. 

(Tempo primo) — The Fairy, disguised as a gypsy, approaches him; she 
takes his hand, and tells his fortune — She dances (tempo agitato) , in- 
creasing her sj>ell over the young man — She speaks to him of his love 
and promises him great happiness — Moved by her words, he begs her 
to lead him to his betrothed — She does so. (Omitted from the suite.) 

III. At the Mill 

(Moderato) — The young man, led by the Fairy, reaches the mill, where he 
finds his betrothed surrounded by her companions, playing round 
games; the Fairy immediately disappears (.Allegretto grazioso) . 

IV. Pas de deux 

(Moderato) — Entrance of the young man (Omitted from the suite) . 
(Adagio) — The young man and his betrothed. 
(V'^ariation: Allegretto grazioso) — The betrothed. 

(Coda: Presto) — The young man, his betrothed, and her companions — 
The betrothed goes to put on her wedding veil — The companions fol- 
low her, leaving the young man alone. 

{The remainder is omitted from, the suite.) 

(Andante non tanto) — The Fairy appears, concealed by a wedding veil; the 
voung man takes her for his betrothed, and approaches her with rap- 
ture; the Fairy throws back her veil. The young man, astonished, per- 
ceives his mistake; he tries to escape, but in vain; his will yields to the 
supernatural charm of the Fairy, who will carry him to an eternal 
existence where, to the strains of her lullaby, she will again give him 
the kiss — The fairy spirits slowly group themselves across the stage 
in ranks representing the infinite immensity of azure space. The Fair)^ 
and the young man are seen on an elevation — She kisses him. 

Stravinsky speaks at length of ''Le Baiser de la Fee" in Chroniques 
de Ma Vie: 

"I was still occupied with the completion of the music of 'Apollon/ " 

CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 
240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Svmphonv Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[Ml 



he -^vrites, "when towards the end of the year previous (1927) I received 
from Mme. Ida Rubinstein the request to compose the ballet. The 
painter, Alexandre Benois, who w^as working in her interests, sub- 
mitted to me two schemes. One of them pleased me in every way: it 
was to create a work under the inspiration of the music of Tchaikovsky. 
My love [tendresse] for this composer and the fact that the coming 
presentations in the month of November would coincide with the 
35th anniversary of his death, confirmed my acceptance of this offer. 
It gave me the opportunity to make a sincere obeisance to the ad- 
mirable talent of this man. 

"As I was free to choose the subject and the scenario of the ballet, I 
began to examine the literature of the nineteenth century in search of 
something in the spirit of Tchaikovsky's music. Accordingly, I looked 
for a great poet w^hose gentle and sensitive soul, and whose restless 
and imaginative nature would be in keeping wdth the character of 
Tchaikovsky. I thought of Hans Christian Andersen, with whom 
Tchaikovsky had more than one trait in common. One need only re- 
call the 'Sleeping Beauty,' the 'Nutcracker Suite,' the 'Swan Lake,' the 
'Pique Dame J and other of his works to realize to what degree the 
fantastic was dear to him. 

"Turning the pages of Andersen, which were well known to me, I 
chanced upon a tale which I had completely forgotten, and which 
seemed to me perfectly suited to my purpose. It was the beautiful tale 
entitled, 'The Ice Maiden.' From this I borrowed the following plot: 
a fairy bestows her magic kiss upon a child at birth and separates him 
from his mother. Twenty years later, at the moment when the young 
man attains his greatest happiness, she gives him once more the fatal 
kiss and closes him in her embrace to possess him forever in supreme 
felicity."* 



* But the kiss of the Ice Maiden in Andersen's tale was the dread kiss of frost. "She, the 
Glacier Queen, the death-dealing, the crushing one, is partly a child of air, partly the 
mighty ruler of the river ; thus she is also able to raise herself to the summit of the snow 
mountain, where the bold climbers are obliged to hew steps in the ice before they can 
mount ; she sails down the rushing stream on the slender fir twig, and springs from one 
block to another, with her long, snow-white hair and her blue-green garment flutterijig 
around her and glittering like the water in the deep Swiss lakes. 

" 'To crush and to hold, mine is the power,' she says. 'They have stolen a beautiful boy 
from me, a boy whom I have kissed, but not kissed to death. He is again among men ; he 
keeps the goats on the mountains, and climbs upwards, ever higher, far away from the 
others, but not from me. He is mine, and I will have him ! ' " 

[copyrighted] 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 
256 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



[»5] 



SYMPHONY HALL, BOSTON 

SUNDAY, MARCH 2 7 

IN TWO PARTS, BEGINNING AT 3 AND 8 

PENSION FUND 

CONCERT BY THE 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



BACH'S 

MASS IN B MINOR 



Assisted by the 

HARVARD GLEE CLUB 

AND 

RADCLIFFE CHORAL SOCIETY 

(G. WALLACE WOODWORTH, Conductor) 
SOLOISTS TO BE ANNOUNCED 



Tickets at box oflBce: $2, $2.50, $3, $3.50, $4, $4.80 (Tax included) 



[16] 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IX THE THEATRE-COXCERT HALL 

Saturday evening lulv 16 ,. 

J '^ J / Lxtia concerts 

Sunday afternoon July 17 aiach-Mozan- 

Saturday evening |uly 23 ^< h"i 

Sunday afternoon fuly 24 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28 

Saturday evening [uly 30 SERIES A 

Sunday afternoon July 3 1 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 SERIES \\ 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening August 1 1 

Saturday evening August 13 SERIES C^ 

Sunday afternoon August 14 

For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, apply at the sul)- 
scription office in Symphony Hall. 






^^ 






Bat^ttiin 




The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — "It is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIN PIMO COMPM¥ 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin alto builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELXTRONIC ORGAN 




BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
1948-1949 

Sanders Theatre, Cambridge \^3Varvard University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 
Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 
Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 

Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 
Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap^ 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 
George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhard t 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 

Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsaki* 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 
John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 
Willem Valkeniei 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



.cMTY-F/p. 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fifth Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, March 8 

with historical and descriptive notes by 

John N. Burk 

The TRUSTEES of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

[erome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



\ ' 1 



SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 
ANNIVERSARY FUND 

of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 

The goal for this appeal, which will be the only 
appeal during this Anniversary Year, is $250,000 
net after all expenses of the Orchestra for the current 
year have been met. This sum is approximately four 
times as much as the amount contributed by the 
Friends of the Orchestra during the past season. 

All who care to join in honoring Dr. Koussevitzky 
on his twenty-fifth year of service in the only 
manner he wants are invited to enroll as Friends 
of the Orchestra and Contributors to the Serge 
Koussevitzky Fund. 

To enroll J simply send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston 75. ''Big" gifts and 
small will he gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 

Gifts received through March 1 total $142,050. 
Oliver Wolcott, Chairman 

FRIENDS OF THE ORCHESTRA 

Edward A. Taft, Chairman 

KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

All gifts to the Orchestra are tax deductible. 



[«] 



Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [Harvard University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FIFTH CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, March 8, ai 8:30 o* clock 



Program 

CoRELLi Sarabande, Gigue and Badinerie 

(arranged for String Orchestra by Ettore Pinelli) 

Vaughan Williams Symphony No. 6 

I. Allegro 

II. Moderate 

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace 

IV. Epilogue 

I N T E R M I S S I O N 

Satie Two "Gymnopedies" 

(Orchestrated by Debussy) 

Debussy "La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques 

I. De I'aube ^i midi sur la mer 
II. Jeux de vagues 
III. Dialogue du vent et de la mer 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 



[Si 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1.00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 

I CKIYIU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE BERKSHIRE MUSIC 
CENTER, 1949 

Dr. Koussevitzky announces plans for 
the 1949 session of the Berkshire Music 
Center at Tanglewood in Lenox, next 
summer. The school will have a six- 
week session from July 4th to August 
14th, through the period of the Berkshire 
Festival concerts (July 16th to August 
14th). 

Dr. Koussevitzky will direct the 
school with Aaron Copland as Assistant 
Director. Additions to the Faculty in- 
clude Olivier Messiaen, the Parisian 
composer, who will make his first visit 
to America to join Aaron Copland as 
teacher of composition. The members 
of the Juilliard String Quartet (Robert 
Mann, Robert KofF, Raphael Hillyer 
and Arthur Winograd) will assist Gregor 
Piatigorsky, who will be in charge of 
Chamber Music. Twenty-five members 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra will 
also take part in this department. Among 
the faculty, together with the principals 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
will be Leonard Bernstein, Richard 
Burgin and Eleazar de Carvalho assist- 
ing Dr. Koussevitzky in the conducting 
classes and with the student orchestra. 
Hugh Ross will head the Choral De- 
partment. Robert Shaw, regularly a 
member of the Choral faculty, will be 
on leave of absence, and Mr. Ross will 
be joined by Christopher Honaas, head 
of the Music Department of Rollins 
College in Winter Park, Florida. 

There will be five departments as in 
former seasons : I Orchestral and Choral 
Conducting, II Orchestra and Chamber 
Music, III Composition, IV Opera and 
V Chorus. The Opera Department will 
include a considerably expanded Opera 
and Chamber Orchestra which will per- 
form for the opera productions and will 
give concerts from the chamber or- 
chestra repertory. There will be some 
40 school performances, including con- 
certs by all the departments, by mem- 
bers of the faculty, and visiting artists, 
and a major opera production under the 
direction of Boris Goldovsky in the tra- 
dition of Benjamin Britten's "Peter 
Grimes" (American premiere in 1946), 
Mozart's "Idomeneo" (American pre- 
miere in 1947) and Rossini's "The Turk 
in Italy" (1948). Members of the 
Friends of the Berkshire Music Center, 
an organization of contributors to the 
support of the school, are invited to 
these concerts. 



r4i 



SUITE {SARABANDE - GIGUE - BADINERIE) 
By Arcangelo Corelli 

Born at Fusignano, near Imola, Italy, February 17 (?) , 1653; died at Rome, 

January 8, 1713 

(Arranged for String Orchestra by Ettore Pinelli) 



Corelli %vrote five sets of sonatas, each containing twelve numbers, and as a sixth 
opus a set of concert! grossi. His Opus 5, consisting of twelve sonatas for violin, 
with basso continuo ("Suonate a Violono e Violone Cembalo") was published at 
Rome in 1700. Corelli 's famous violin piece, "La Folia" in itself an arrangement 
of a traditional air, is in the last sonata of this series. Ettore Pinelli (1843-1915) 
has chosen three movements from these sonatas for the present suite. 

CORELLI was a personage of widespread fame in his day. The partic- 
ulars of his career are largely fabulous, and little is known of his 
early life. Various anecdotes about him have been handed down, each 
always quoted with an appendage of doubt as to its authenticity. 
Certain it is that he was the prime spirit in the development of 
music by bowed instruments when instrumental music found its first 
full flowering in seventeenth-century Italy. If his was not a profoundly 
original talent, he gave a great impetus to the art of violin playing 
by his example as virtuoso, to solo and concerted music by his com- 
positions, published and widely circulated in his time. 

Corelli has been described as "modest, amiable, simple in his ways 
o*f life, almost shabbily dressed, always going on foot instead of taking 
a carriage." But there is no lack of extravagant praise from his con- 
temporaries. One of his countrymen called him "II virtuosissimo di 
violino e vero Orfeo di nostri tempi," and George Mattheson, in Ger- 
many, named him "the prince of all musicians." His pupil, 
Geminiani, issued a more considered judgment. "His merit was not 
depth of learning like that of Alessandro Scarlatti, nor great fancy or 
rich invention in melody or harmony, but a nice ear and most delicate 
taste which led him to select the most pleasing harmonies and melodies, 
and to construct the parts so as to produce the most delightful effect 
upon the ear." 

[copyrighted] 



<^^Q:^ 



[5] 



SYMPHONY NO. 6 

By Ralph Vaughan Williams 

Born in Down Ampney, Gloucestershire, England, October 12, 1872 



This Symphony had its first performance by the Royal Philharmonic Orchestra 
in Albert Hall, London, Sir Adrian Boult conducting, April 21, 1948. The symphony 
had its first American performance under Dr. Koussevitzky's direction at the Berk- 
shire Festival, August 7 last. 

The score calls for three flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, two 
clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, tenor saxophone, four 
horns, three trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, side drum, bass drum, 
cymbals, triangle, xylophone, two harps and strings. 

Mr. Vaughan- Williams made an analysis of his new symphony for 
the program of the Royal Philharmonic Society when it was first 
performed. The Englishman, as if wary of emotional commitment, 
writes technically, and takes refuge in light, deprecating touches. 

This Symphony was begun probably about 1944 and finished in 
1947. It is scored for full orchestra including Saxophone. There are 
four movements: Allegro, Moderato, Scherzo and Epilogue. Each of 
the first three has its tail attached to the head of its neighbour. 

First Movement — A llegro 

The key of E minor is at once established through that of F minor, 
A-flat becoming G-sharp and sliding down to G natural at the half 
bar thus:— 



Ex. 1 




4 






:^niU=tziifcfei:t=:i 



r-(- 



UJ 



^i;:^=z=: 



:8: 



:p: 



The last three notes of (1) are continued, rushing down and up 
again through all the keys for which there is time in two bars, all over a 
tonic pedal. Two detached chords 



Ex.2 




#-fe2: 



t 



:z\=z 



lead to a repetition of the opening bar, but this time the music re- 
mains in F minor and the rush up and down is in terms of the first 

[6] 



phrase. While strings and wind remain busy over this the brass plays 
a passage which becomes important later on 



Ex.3 




=r=a: 



■#*-• 



rt^i i~^ 



The fussy semiquavers continue in the bass while the treble has a new 
tune in the cognate key of C minor 



Ex.4 




^:|lzi3=E 



^- 



V— / — [-- 



%^ 



j!^. 



qV^H— ^-1^ 



tf*zi2li= 



etc. 



Then the position is reversed and the treble fusses while the bass has 
the tune. This leads us back to our tonic pedal and the instruments 
rush around as at the beginning. Thus ends the first section of the 
movement. The next section starts with this persistent rhythm:— 



Ex.5 ^ 



J" 



Over this trumpets, flutes and clarinets play a tune in cross-rhythm 
which starts thus 



E-^i^^^s 



::^ 



^=5: 



-^^5^ 



-^v 



5 



;i3^E3^3=[ 



|— — i %1^ =^=5s-r=i-|s: 



etc. 



® 

DOUBLE BASS 
RECORDS 

The Anniversary Album of 
Double Bass records by Serge 
Koussevitzky (private souvenir 
pressing) is now on sale at the 
Box Office. The proceeds (at 
$10 each) will benefit the 
Koussevitzky 25th Anniversary 
Fund. 

® 



The Record S 



HOP 



Tech' 



Opposite 

One of the largest stocks of 
records in New England. Rec- 
ords fronn over sixty American 
and foreign companies. Mail 
orders shipped anywhere. 

THE FISHER radio-phono- 
graph and Television — sole 
distributors. 

Ample parking space in rear 

90 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS. Kl 7-6686 

f7] 




THE WORLD'S GREATESI 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs 
through the "Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor 
''Crestwood" ! Hear your treasured recordings brilliantly repro- 
duced! De luxe automatic record changer with "Silent Sapphire" 
permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short-wave radio. AC. Victrola 
8V151. "Victrola"—!. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 



HAVE YOU HEA 



\ 



I X 



^((jO^ef/M^ 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you a wealth of his 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor -Beethoven. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Conciuctor; with Frances Yeend; Eunice Alberts; 
David Lloyd; James Pease; and the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus under 
the direction of Robert Shaw. DM-119a $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor 'Red Seal' 
De Luxe Records), $17. 

t Francesco do Rimini, Op. 32-Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. Album DM-1 179, $4.75. 

t Symphony No. 5, in B-Flot-Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-1 21 5, $4.75. 

Ail fKices ore suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclusive of locol taxes, 
r DM" ond "DV" albums olso available in manual sequence, %] extro.) 



ISTS ARE 



(Hi/ 



mK%vik 



^ ^ 



^^^ ICA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NIC 



This continues for a considerable time with some incidental references 
to Ex. 3 and is followed by a new tune while the persistent rhythm 
persists. 




^^= 



4«^^KE?E^^ 



piqr^ija^q 



irzziii 



t=: 



t= 



^ _^^. 



az^zzi 



-t- 



Then we are given a further installment of Ex. 6. The brass now plays 
Ex. 7 very loud and this brings us to, what I believe the professional 
Annotator would call the ''reprise in due course." As a matter of fact 
this reprise is only hinted at, just enough to show that this is a Sym- 
phony and not a symphonic poem. But I am not sure that the "due 
course" is well and truly followed when we find the tune Ex. 7 
played for yet a third time (this time in E major) quietly by the 
strings accompanied by harp chords. To make an end and just to 
show that after all the movement is in E minor, there is an enlarge- 
ment of the opening bar. 

Second Movement — Moderato 

This leads on from the first movement without a break. The prin- 
cipal theme is based on this rhythm 



Ex.sf 



(jTJ ^ J^J 



^ -TJ 



etc. 



sometimes "straight" and sometimes in cross-rhythm. A flourish fol- 
lows, first on the brass loud, then on the woodwind loud and then 
soft on the strings. 



Ex.9 



[gE|^^tg3ip 



^^: 



-r— 



EEE3 



^ 



t:: 






j^r:fc^^- 



trzr. 



Between each repetition there is a unison passage for strings 
Ex.10 



I^^^^eS^^eU^^^M 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 
Refresher courses in music education and theoretical subjects; courses in 
counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 
individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-September 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 



[lol 



The strings continue softly, but before they have finished the trumpets 
enter with this figure taken from the opening theme 



ell m 



w 



-9- -9- -0- 



The trumpets start almost inaudibly, but they keep hammering away 
at their figure for over forty bars getting louder and louder. Mean- 
while the rest of the Orchestra have been busy chiefly with the melody 
though not the rhythm of the opening theme. Having reached its 
climax the music dies down. The Cor Anglais plays a bit of Ex. 10 
and this leads direct to the Third Movement. 

Third Movement — Scherzo 

This may be possibly best described as fugal in texture but not in 
structure. The principal subject does not appear at the beginning. 
Various instruments make bad shots at it and after a bit it settles down 
as 



Ex. 12 







With this is combined a trivial little tune, chiefly on the higher wood- 
wind. 






An episodical tune is played on the Saxophone and is repeated loud 
by the full orchestra. 

Ex.14 






etc. 



(Constant Lambert tells us that the only thing to do with a folk- 
tune is to play it soft and repeat it loud. This is not a folk tune but 
the same difficulty seems to crop up) . 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 



TEACHER OF SINGING 
Symphony Chambers 



846 Huntington Avenue 



Boston, Massachusetts 



Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 



Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 



Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



r«'] 




The Treasurer's Report 
that Nobody Wanted to Hear 

It was bad news. Production was up. Sales were up. But 
profits took a nose dive. One item did it ... a hidden 
bombshell ... an embezzlement of several thousand dollars 
by a "faithful" employee with the company for twenty years. 

This goes on all the time. Your company might be next. 
Let The Employers' Group Man with the Plan show you 
how easy and inexpensive it is to prevent such losses with 
our Dishonesty Protection Plan. 

THE EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

110 Milk St., Boston 7, Mass. 
The Employers' Group Man is The Man with the Plan 




[12] 



When the episode is over the woodwind experiment as to how the 
fugue subject will sound upside down but the brass are angry and in- 
sist on playing it the right way up, so for a bit the two go on to- 
gether and to the delight of everyone including the composer the two 
versions fit, so there is nothing to do now but to continue, getting 
more excited till the episode tune comes back very loud and twice 
as slow. Then once more we hear the subject softly upside down and the 
Bass clarinet leads the way to the last movement. 

Fourth Movement — Epilogue 

It is very difficult to describe this movement analytically. It 15 
directed to be played very soft throughout. The music drift's about 
contrapuntally with occasional whiffs of theme such as 



iz^zzq^z^^izr- =i— P??=«— 



Ex. 15 MElE«EfE^^E=Ef=£^i 

with one or two short episodes such as this, on the horns 



Ex 16 



1 V 



^=:^g=i 



y=a^ 









-B- 






Sanders Theatre . Cambridge 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Tuesday Evenings z^pril ^^ ^949 
at 8.30 o'clock 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are given 
each Monday, 1:30-2 WBZ, on the National Broadcasting Company 
Network. 



[13] 



and this on the oboe 




Ex. 17^=:ii;i^[|» 



etc. 



At the very end the strings cannot make up their minds whether 
to finish in E-flat major or E minor. They finally decide on E minor 
which is, after all, the home key. 

The Composer wishes to acknowledge with thanks the help of Mr. 
Roy Douglas in preparing the orchestral score. R V W 

[copyrighted] 



GYMNOP£DIES Nos. i and 3 (Orchestrated by Claude Debussy) 

By Erik Satie 
Born at Honfleur, France, May 17, 1866; died at Arcueil, near Paris, July 1, 1925 

Satie composed his three "Gymnopedies" in 1888. Debussy orchestrated the first 
and last of them (but reversed their order) . The first (Satie 's third) , lente et grave, 
is scored for two flutes, oboe, four horns, and strings. The second (Satie's first) , 
lente et douloureuse, adds a cymbal (struck with a drum stick) and two harps, 

AT the age of twenty-two Erik Satie was an obscure musician with 
xX indolent ways, who had an alert ear for musical currents but had 
as yet allied himself with none. It was then that he wrote pieces for 
the pianoforte, dances "slow, grave, processional in tone, suavely and 
serenely classical in spirit," and named them ''Gymnopedies/' after a 
ritual of ancient Sparta. 

Satie inherited from his Scotch mother the two un-Latin middle 
names, Alfred Leslie. Philip Hale wrote in his monograph on the 
French composer: "An old lady of Scotch descent named Hanton, 
living in London, had a daughter, who, a rather romantic person, 
happened to visit Honfleur. She met the elder Satie, loved him, and 
married him. She wished to show Scotland to her husband. The child, 
Erik, was 'formed under the influence of joy and audacity, of sea 
mists, and of penetrating bag-pipe melodies.' The boy, when he was 
eight years old, learned music from an organist of St. Catherine, a 
church on the Honfleur coast. At the age of eleven, he entered the 
Paris Conservatory and studied under Guiraud and Mathias. The 
latter, finding him indolent, advised him to study the violin, for it 
would be of more use to him. Erik attended a composition class as a 
listener. He was more interested in plain song, mediaeval religious 
# polyphony known to him at Honfleur. He had already written much, 

constantin hountasis 
VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[14] 



when feeling his technique insufficient, he went, over forty years old, 
to the Schola Cantorum for the rigid discipline of fugue and counter- 
point under Albert Roussel. 

"Satie was poor and unknown for many years, but he had one con- 
solation: he was a humoristic ironist. Perhaps he was sincere when he 
called himself a Symbolist. He fell in with that strange person, the 
Sar Peladan, and composed music for his 'Le Fils des Etoiles' also 
'Sonneries de la Rose Crois/ The Sar praised him, classing him with 
Wagner and Grieg, as the only true composers. For the Sar's novel 
'La Panthee/ Satie wrote a 'theme.' There is the 'Prelude de la Porte 
hero'ique du Ciel.' 

"He gave singular titles 'to early compositions: 'Veritables preludes 
fiasques (pour un chien) ' ; 'Trois Morceaux en forme de poire'; 'En 
habit de chevaV ; 'The Dreamy Fish'; 'Airs to make one run'; 'Things 
seen right and left' (piano and violin) . He told pianists that they 
must play a piece 'on yellow velvet, dry as a cuckoo, light as an t^g') 
or 'in the most profound silence,' 'with hands in the pockets,' 'like 
a nightingale with the toothache.' He would write a programme: 
*This is the chase of the lobster; the hunters descend to the bottom of 
the water; they run. The sound of a horn is heard at the bottom of 
the sea. The lobster is tracked. The lobster weeps.' He wrote for other 
compositions: 'Those who will not understand are begged to keep the 
most respectful silence and to show an attitude of complete submission 
and complete inferiority.' Poseur, buffoon? It was admitted that at 
least he had originality. In his latter years, when he said it was neces- 
sary to be serious in life, he added, 'Debussy and Ravel have done me 
the honor to say that they found certain things in my music — perhaps 
— it hardly matters — if I have failed it is because I have been a 
dreamer, and dreamers are at a disadvantage — they are too rare.' 

"He knew his hour of glory when his 'Socrate/ a symbolical drama 
for voices and orchestra, text based on Plato's Dialogues (published 
in 1918) , was produced. For a time he associated with the 'Six,' but he 
formed another group composed of Henri Cliquet, Roger Desormiere, 
Henri Sauguet and Maxine Jacob, and presented them in a concert on 
June 14, 1923. Mr. Olin Downes described him as 'an amusing old 
man, a dilettante of the future, who wore a blue, shiny suit, a gleam- 
ing eyeglass, and misleading whiskerage, and ate his food in a mincing 
and derisive manner.' Lonely at Arcueil, he read the novels of young 
Raymond Radiguet and the fairy tales of Hans Christian Andersen. 

"Jean Cocteau admired him to the last. 'One of Satie's charms,' 
he wrote in 1918, 'is the little ground he offers for his deification. His 
titles authorize those who don't know their worth to laugh. Debussy 
is only a near-sighted ear, while Satie comes to us today young among 
the young, at last finding his place after twenty years of modes*^ work.' 

rcOPYRIGHTFOl 

JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 
256 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



[»:;] 



"THE SEA" (Three Orchestral Sketches) 
By Claude Debussy 

Bom at Saint-Germain (Seine-et-Oise) , France, August 2Z, 1862; 
died at Paris, March 25, 1918 



It was in the years 1903-05 that Debussy composed "La Mer." It was first per- 
formed at the Concerts Lamoureux in Paris, October 15, 1905. The first per- 
formance at the Boston Symphony concerts was on March 2, 1907, Dr. Karl Muck 
conductor (this was also the first performance in the United States) . 

"La Mer" is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, 
three bassoons, double bassoon, four horns, three .trumpets, two cornets-d-pistons, 
three trombones, tuba, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, glockenspiel (or celesta) , 
timpani, bass drum, two harps, and strings. 

Debussy made a considerable revision of the score, which was published in 1909. 

There could be no denying Debussy's passion for the sea: he fre- 
quently visited the coast resorts, spoke and wrote with constant en- 
thusiasm about "my old friend the sea, always innumerable and beauti- 
ful/* He often recalled his impressions of the Mediterranean at Cannes, 
where he spent boyhood days. It is worth noting, however, that 
Debussy did not seek the seashore while at work upon his *'La Mer.*' 
His score was with him at Dieppe, in 1904, but most of it was written 
in Paris, a milieu which he chose, if the report of a chance remark 
is trustworthy, "because the sight of the sea itself fascinated him to 
such a degree that it paralyzed his creative faculties." When he went 
to the country in the summer of 1903, two years before the completion 
of *'La Mer** it was not the shore, but the hills of Burgundy, whence 
he wrote to his friend Andre Messager (September 12) : "You may 
not know that I was destined for a sailor's life and that it was only 
quite by chance that fate led me in another direction. But I have al- 
ways retained a passionate love for her [the sea]. You will say that 
the Ocean does not exactly wash the Burgundian hillsides — and my 
seascapes might be studio landscapes; but I have an endless store of 
memories, and to my mind they are worth more than the reality, 
whose beauty often deadens thought." 

Debussy's deliberate remoteness from reality, consistent with his 
cultivation of a set and conscious style, may have drawn him from 
salty actuality to the curling lines, the rich detail and balanced 
symmetry of Hokusai's "The Wave." In any case, he had the famous 
print reproduced upon the cover of his score. His love for Japanese 
art tempted him to purchases which in his modest student days were 
a strain upon his purse. His piano piece, "Poissons d'or/* of 1907, was 
named from a piece of lacquer in his possession. 

f copyrighted] 



[i6 1 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evening July 16' 

Sunday afternoon ]\x\y 17 

Saturday evening July 23 

Sunday afternoon July 24 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28, 

Saturday evening July 30 ^ 

Sunday afternoon July 31. 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening August 1 1 

Saturday evening August 13' 

Sunday afternoon August 14' 



Extra concerts 
(Bach-Mozart- 
Haydn- 
Schubert) 



SERIES A 



SERIES B 



SERIES C 



For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, apply at the sub- 
scription office in Symphony Hall. 




The Boston Symphony's 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — '^it is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 



THE BALDWIN PIMO COHPMV 

160 Boylston St., Boston . Eastern Headquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 

Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and the BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 






SL» 



<m 



j^ 



'\ r 



r\i,. 



^9 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



l^^ 



?^ 



m 



r-.'y^/'/^y- 



^ — 



sx^vj 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948-1949 

Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [harvard University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
U'^.niel Eisler 
Noiinar) Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Virtor Manusevitch 
fames Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 
Lloyd S tones treet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap6 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhard t 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 

Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 

Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakii 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsk)! 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 

Principals 
Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John CoflEey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 



Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Sixth Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, April 5 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 

f 1] 



ANNOUNCEMENT 



The names o£ those who have joined the Friends 
of the Boston Symphony Orchestra before April 12, 
1949, will be printed as is customary in the next to 
the last program book of the season, April 22-23. 

A gift this year not only benefits the Orchestra 
but serves to honor Dr. Koussevitzky on his Twenty- 
fifth year of service in the only manner he wants. 

Edward A. Taft, 

Chairman, Anniversary Fund 



ENROLL INCREASE 

I pledge to the Boston Symphony Orchestra the 

sum of $ covered by check herewith or 

payable on 

Name 

Address . . . .^ 

Checks are payable to 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, INC. 



( s 1 



Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [Harvarci University^ 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SIXTH CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, April 5, at 8:30 o'clock 



The Program has been revised as follows: 

Beethoven Symphony No. 1 in C major, Op. 21 

I. Adagio molto 

II. Andante cantabile con moto 

III. Menuetto: Allegro molto e vivace 

IV. Finale: Adagio; Allegro molto e vivace 

RoussEL Suite in \ major, Op. 33 

I. Prelude 
II. Sarabande 
III. Gigue 

INTERMISSION 

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 

I. Andante sosteniito. Moderate con anima in movimentc di Valsc 

II. Andantino in modo di canzona 

III. Scherzo: pizzicato ostinato; Allegro 

IV. Finale: Allegro con fuoco 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are given 
each Monday, 1:30-2 WBZ, on the National Broadcasting Company 
Network. 



Sanders Theatre, Cambridge [Harvarci University] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SIXTH CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, April 5, at S:^o o'clock 



Program 



RoussEL Suite in F major. Op. 33 

I. Prelude 
II. Sarabande 
III. Gigue 

Wagner Prelude to "Lohengrin" 

Strauss "Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, after the Old- 
fashioned, Roguish Manner in Rondo Form,'* 

Op. 28 

INI ER MISSION 

Tchaikovsky Symphony No. 4 in F minor, Op. 36 

I. Andante sostenuto. Moderate con anima in movimento di Valse 

II. Andantino in modo di canzona 

III. Scherzo: pizzicato ostinato; Allegro 

IV. Finale: Allegro con fuoco 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are given 
each Monday, 1:30-2 WBZ, on the National Broadcasting Company 
Network. 



f 81 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelltone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelltone 1.25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Flooting Point 50c 

I CKIflU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



MUSIC AND MORALITY 

One can understand that a young com- 
poser, at the beginning of his twenties, 
is influenced by a ten or fifteen year 
older composer, whose style and tech- 
nique are already established distinctly. 
But after having acquired a certain 
ability himself, everybody must start 
producing something that has not been 
said before him. 

This is perhaps why Mozart had said : 
"Lernt's was, Buben, datnit ihr was 
koennt!" ("Study, boys, in order to know 
something.") And Wagner: "Macht etwas 
Neues!" ("Produce something new.") 

How then can one explain today's aim 
of most composers, artists, writers, etc., 
to produce something similar to the last 
success on the stage, the movies, the 
radio, novels and music? Has originality 
lost its appreciation? Does it interfere 
too much with the commercial success? 

One can understand that fear for one's 
life may cause a man to bow to dictator- 
ship, though, however, there have been 
men who did not hesitate to die for their 
conviction. Tolerate Shostakovitch's bow 
to the pressure of ignorant politicians. 
But must one tolerate the moral and 
mental baseness of people who bow to 
the mere temptation of profits? 

There arise the following problems: 

1) Is it esthetically and morally ad- 
missible to accommodate [oneself] to 
the listener's mentality and preference? 

2) If so, is there not a limit how far 
such accommodation is allowed to go? 

3) Does such accommodation promote 
the artistic culture of a nation? 

4) Does it promote morality? 

5) Is it not more healthy to give a 
nation a chance to admire its heroes than 
to applaud the fleeting success of an 
ephemeron? 

— ARNOLD SCHOENBERG 

The Composer's News-Record, 
December 1948 



r4i 



SUITE IN F MAJOR, Op. 33 
By Albert Charles Paul Roussel 

Born at Turcoing (Xord) , France, on April 5, 1869; died at Royan (near Bordeaux) , 

France, August 23, 1937 



Roussel composed this Suite in 1926 for the Boston Symphony Orchestra and 
dedicated his score to Serge Koussevitzky. The first sketches were made in March, 
and the score was completed August 26. The first performance took place at 
these concerts, Januarv' 21, 1927. There was another performance March 17, 1933. 
Vladimir Golschmann conducted it as guest, January 21, 1944. 

The orchestration is as follows: two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, English 
horn, two clarinets, bass clarinet, three bassoons, four horns, four trumpets, three 
trombones, tuba, timpani, side-drum, bass drum, cymbals, tambourine, triangle, 
xylophone, tam-tam, celesta and strings. 

THIS Suite followed the composer's tendency in the early twenties to 
relinquish his pursuit of pictorial subjects and to devote himself to 
the absolute style — what the French call ''de la musique pure." His 
fondness for the classical form w^as also evident in his symphonies 
dating from the same period. The First Symphony, Le Poeme de la 
Foret, Op. 7 (1904-06) , had been a descriptive piece in symphonic 
contour. The Second Symphony in B-flat minor. Op. 23 (1919-20) 
marked, in the words of the composer, a new departure for him. "^Vhat 
I want to realize," he explained later in the Guide de Concert, "is a 
music satisfying in itself, a music which seeks to eliminate all pic- 
turesque and descriptive elements. ... I force myself always to put 
out of my mind the memory of objects and forms susceptible to in- 
terpretation in musical sounds. I wish to make only music." The 
Third Symphony in G minor, Op. 4.2 (1922) , the Sinfonietta for 
Strings, Op. 52 (1903-04), and the Fourth Symphony in A major, 
Op. 53 (1930) all align Roussel with the then prevailing revival of 
eighteenth century form, while showing him more than ever an in- 
dividual artist speaking in his own voice. These symphonies (except 
the first) have all been played by the Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

The "terrific drive and force" of the prelude to the suite is pointed 
out by Norman Demuth in his Study of Roussel. "The whole move- 
ment," he remarks, "scores remarkably well for military band (or 
'Harmonie' — as the French call the medium) , and the writer has 
vivid memories of it in this form played by the band of the Garde 
Republicaine at the 1937 Festival of the International Society for 
Contemporary Music." 

"The Sarabande," says this writer, "is a different matter altogether; 
there is considerable chromaticism and contrapuntal weaving which 
is obscure on the piano. There is nothing archaic about this music 

[51 



It does not 'breathe the spirit of Spain* or do anything which one 
might fear." The writer discerns, "a firmness and a solidity of harmony; 
no counterpoint, merely a succession of logical chords, logical that is 
to say according to the principles of chordal progression of a tradi- 
tional type and in the mood of the ancient dance. . . . The final gigue 
is like most of its kind — exuberant, lively and rhythmical with all 
the go and drive in the world. This one is basically harmonic, in- 
tensely tight, but always moving forward and forward to its climaxes. 
The ghost of 'The -Dargason' looms faintly in the distance; probably 
Roussel never heard this tune." 

The final Roussel is characterized with intimate understanding by 
Arthur Hoeree in a book on his late friend: 

"The Suite in F inaugurates the composer's fourth manner. He there 
resolves the classical problem of equilibrium between form and style, 
a point of wisdom in which the great masters have before reached 
their apex. His constant evolution, a sign of vitality, does not pre- 
clude a fundamental unity which is in itself aesthetic. Its charac- 
teristics are closely bound to the life, the formation, the dominant 
racial traits of the musician. 

"Is his approach to his creative problem objective or subjective? 
Classic or romantic? To tell the truth, any original artist expressing 
himself forcefully in his work is in some degree romantic. 'Some of our 
contemporary composers,' this one has written, 'are romantics in the 
best sense of the word. Has not our Debussy expressed in a language 
indifferent to eloquence or expostulation the shapes belonging to his 
interior being? That species of romanticism is healthy.' On the other 
hand he finds morbid 'any sentiment resulting in an italicism of self.' 
The composer of Evocations^ who harbored a deep love of nature, 
had the exceptional gift of transposing into music the pictures in his 
mind's eye. ... 

[copyrighted] 



KOUSSEVITZKY MUNCH 

BERNSTEIN CARVALHO 

And other notable Symphony Hail personalities 

Vividly presented in action sketches and comment 
in a beautiful new book to be published soon — 

"AN EYE FOR MUSIC" 

Pictures and Text by 
MARTHA BURNHAM HUMPHREY 

Address inquiries to 

H. M. TEICH & CO., The Algonquin Press 

712 Beacon Street, Boston 15, Mass. 



[6] 



PRELUDE TO "LOHENGRIN'* 
By Richard Wagner 

Born at Leipzig, May 22, 1813; died at Venice, February 13, 1883 



IN March of 1848, Wagner put the last touches upon his "Lohen- 
grin," and in May of the following year his political activities re- 
sulted in his exile from Germany. He therefore had no direct super- 
vision of the early productions of the work in Weimar, and elsewhere, 
nor did he hear it until May 15, 1861, in Vienna, following his pardon 
and return. "Lohengrin" had its first performance at the instigation 
of his ministering friend, Liszt, August 28, 1850, with such forces, 
scarceh' adequate, as the court at Weimar permitted. It found favor, 
and after several years of managerial hesitation, added to Wagner's 
mistrust of uncoached conductors, went the rounds of the principal 
opera houses of Germany and Austria. 

Franz Liszt, the first champion and first producer of "Lohengrin," 
has described the Prelude in this way: "It begins with a broad, re- 
poseful surface of melody, a vaporous ether gradually unfolding itself, 
so that the sacred picture may be delineated before our secular eyes. 
This effect is confided entirely to the violins (divided into eight dif- 
ferent desks) , which, after some bars of harmony, continue in the 
highest notes of their register. The motive is afterwards taken up by 

the softest wind instruments; horns and bassoons are then added, and 
the way prepared for the entry of the trumpets and trombones, which 
repeat the melody for the fourth time, with a dazzling brightness of 
colour, as if in this unique moment the holy edifice had flashed up 
before our blinded eyes in all its luminous and radiant magnificence. 
"But the flood light, that has gradually achieved this solar intensity. 



® 

DOUBLE BASS 
RECORDS 

The Anniversary Album of 
Double Bass records by Serge 
Koussevitzky (private souvenir 
pressing) is now on sale at the 
Box Office. The proceeds (at 
$10 each) will benefit the 
Koussevitzky 25th Anniversary 
Fund. 



The Record Shop 

opposite "Tech" 

One of the largest stocks of 
records in New England. Rec- 
ords from over sixty American 
and foreign companies. Mail 
orders shipped anywhere. 

THE FISHER radio-phono- 
graph and Television — sole 
distributors. 

Ample parking space in rear 

90 MASSACHUSETTS AVENUE 
CAMBRIDGE, MASS- 



Kl 7-6686 



[7] 




THE WORLD'S GREATEST! 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs 
through the "Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor 
"Crestwood"! Hear your treasured recordings brilliantly repro- 
duced I De luxe automatic record changer with "Silent Sapphire" 
permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short-wave radio. AC. Victrola 
8V151. "Victrola"— T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 




HAVE YOU HEARD Tl 



I 8 1 



I 



i>j{i^ imMufiM^ 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you a wealth of his 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor- Beethoven. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor; with Frances Yeend; Eunice Alberts; 

David Lloyd; James Pease; and the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus under 
the direction of Robert Shaw. DM-n90, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor ^Red Seal' 
De Luxe Records), $17. 

• Francesco do Rimini, Op. 32-Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. Album DM-1179, $4.75. 

• Symphony No. 5, in B-Flot-Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-1215, $4.75. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclusive of local taxes, 
("DM" and "DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



STS ARE 



(Hj 



WMI^mk 



tJ?^ 



^-^^ RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 

[9] 



now dies rapidly away, like a celestial gleam. The transparent vapour 
of the clouds retracts, the vision disappears little by little, in the same 
variegated fragrance from the midst of which it appeared, and the 
piece ends with a repetition of the first six bars, now become more 
ethereal still. Its character of ideal mysticism is especially suggested 
by the long pianissimo of the orchestra, only broken for a moment by 
the passage in which the brass throw out the marvellous lines of the 
single motive of the Prelude." 

[ COPYRIGHTED 1 



'TILL EULENSPIEGEL'S MERRY PRANKS, AFTER THE OLD- 
FASHIONED JR.OGUISH MANNER - IN RONDO FORM," 
FOR Full Orchestra, Op. 28 

By Richard Strauss 
Born at Munich, June 11, 1864 



The first performance was at a Gurzenich concert in Cologne, November 5, 1895. 
Strauss had completed his score in Munich the previous May. It had been pub- 
lished in September. The first performance at the Boston Symphony Concerts (and 
in America) was February 21, 1896. 

The rondo, dedicated to Dr. Arthur Seidl, is scored for piccolo, three flutes, three 
oboes, English horn, small clarinet in E-flat, two clarinets, bass clarinet, three bas- 
soons, double-bassoon, four horns (with the addition of four horns ad lib.), three 
trumpets (with three additional trumpets ad lib.), three trombones, bass tuba, kettle- 
drums, snare drum, bass drum, cymbals, triangle, a watchman's rattle, strings. 

A T FIRST, Strauss was inclined to let the title: "Till EulenspiegeVs 
Jl\. lustige Streiche, nach alter Schelmenweise — in Rondojorm" 
stand as sufficient explanation of his intentions. Franz Wiillner, about 
to perform the work in Cologne, coaxed from him a letter which 
revealed a little more: 

**lt is impossible for me to tumish a programme to 'EulenspiegeV; 
were I to put into words the thoughts which its several incidents 
suggested to me, they would seldom suffice, and might even give rise 
to offence. Let me leave it, therefore, to my hearers to crack the hard 
nut which the Rogue has prepared for them. By way of helping them 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 

Refresher courses in music education and theoretical subjects; courses in 

counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 

individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-September 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 



[10] 



to a better understanding, it seems sufficient to point out the two 
'EulenspiegeV motives, which, in the most manifold disguises, moods, 
and situations, pervade the whole up to the catastrophe, when, after 
he has been condemned to death. Till is strung up to the gibbet. 
For the rest, let them guess at the musical joke which a Rogue has 
ofiEered them." Strauss finally noted three themes: the opening of the 
introduction, the horn motive of Till, and the portentous descending 
interval of the rogue's condemnation. 

But Strauss was persuaded by Wilhelm Mauke, the most elaborate 
and exhaustive of Straussian analysts, to jot the following indications 
in pencil in his score: 

"Once upon a time there was a Volksnarr; Named Till Eulenspiegel; 
That was an awful hobgoblin; Off for New Pranks; Just wait, you 
hypocrites! HopI On horseback into the midst of the market-women; 
With seven-league boots he lights out; Hidden in a Mouse-hole; Dis- 
guised as a Pastor, he drips with unction and morals; Yet out of his 
big toe peeps the Rogue; But before he gets through he nevertheless 
has qualms because of his having mocked religion; Till as cavalier 
pays court to pretty girls; She has really made an impression on him; 
He courts her; A kind refusal is still a refusal; Till departs furious; 
He swears vengeance on all mankind; Philistine Motive; After he has 
profMDunded to the Philistines a few amazing theses he leaves them in 
astonishment to their fate; Great grimaces from afar; Till's street tune; 
The coiu-t of Justice; He still whistles to himself indifferently; Up the 
ladderl There he swings; he gasps for air, a last convulsion; the mortal 
part of Till is no more." 

[COPYRir.HTED] 



k . 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 
256 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 
246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of sinfring by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 




The Treasurer's Report 
that Nobody Wanted to Hear 

It was bad news. Production was up. Sales were up. But 
profits took a nose dive. One item did it ... a hidden 
bombshell ... an embezzlement of several thousand dollars 
by a "faithful" employee with the company for twenty years. 

This goes on all the time. Your company might be next. 
Let The Employers' Group Man with the Flan show you 
^how easy and inexpensive it is to prevent such losses with 
I our Dishonesty Protection Plan. 



THE EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

110 Milk St., Boston 7, Mass. 
The Employers' Group Man is The Man with the Plan 




[12] 



SIXTY-NINTH SEASON 1949—1950 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor 

A Series of Six 
TUESDAY EVENING CONCERTS 

at 8:30 
November 1 November 29 December 20 

January 24 February 21 March 21 

Members of the University who secured season tickets for 
the present season through the Bursar's Office will have 
an opportunity to re-subscribe in the same way as in the 
past. 

Subscribers in Non-University sections will receive an 
invitation in the autumn to renew their subscriptions 
for the coming season. 

All Season Tickets are $12 each, including 20 per cent 
Federal Tax. 

Applications for seats in Non-University sections should 
be addressed to 

G. E. JUDD, Manager 

SYMPHONY HALL, BOSTON, MASS. 



Cambridge subscribers who may be interested in the 
Friday Afternoon, Saturday Evening, Sunday Afternoon, 
or Tuesday Evening Series in Boston are invited to 
inquire for particulars at the subscription office. Sym- 
phony Hall. 



r»s] 



SYMPHONY IN F MINOR, NO. 4, Op. 36 
By Peter Ilich Tchaikovsky 

Born at Votkinski, in the government of Viatka, Russia, May 7, 1840; 
died at St. Petersburg, November 6, 1893 



The Fourth Symphony, composed in 1877, was first performed by the Russian 
Musical Society in Moscow, February 22, 1878. 

The orchestration includes two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two 
bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, 
cymbals, triangle, and strings. 

THE year 1877 was a critical one in Tchaikovsky's life. He suffered 
a serious crisis, and survived it through absorption in his art, 
through the shaping and completion of his Fourth Symphony. 

The dramatic conflict and emotional voice of this symphony and 
the two that followed somehow demand a programme. It may be 
worth inquiring to what extent the Fourth Symphony may have been 
conditioned by his personal life at the time. Tchaikovsky admitted 
the implication of some sort of programme in the Fourth. He volun- 
tarily gave to the world no clue to any of the three, beyond the mere 
word *'Pathetique" for the last, realizing, as he himself pointed out, 
the complete failure of words to convey the intense feeling which 
found its outlet, and its only outlet, in tone. He did indulge in a 
fanciful attempt at a programme for the Fourth, writing confidentisdly 
to Mme. von Meek, in answer to her direct question, and at the end 
of the same letter disqualified this attempt as inadequate. These para- 
graphs, nevertheless, are often quoted as the official gospel ot the 
symphony, without Tchaikovsky's postscript of dismissal. It would 
be a good deal more just to the composer to quote merely a single 
sentence which he wrote to Taneiev: "Of course my symphony is pro- 
gramme music, but it would be impossible to give the programme in 
words; it would appear ludicrous and only raise a smile." The pro- 
gramme devolves upon the cyclic brass theme of "inexorable fate" 
which opens the work and recurs at the end. Again, a fragmentary 
sketch of a programme for the Fifth Symphony has been recently 
discovered, in which "fate" is found once more. The word, to most 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLEVS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 
Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 

[Ml 



LIST OF WORKS 

Performed in the Cambridge Series 
DURING THE SEASON 1948-1949 



Stravinsky 



Tchaikovsky 
Vaughan Williams 



«^. r. jc. x)Aun. 




Brahms . . . . 




Bruckner 




CORELLI . . . . 




Debussy . . . . 




Irving Fine . 




HONEGGER 




Mozart . . . . 




RiMSKY-KORSAKOV . 




ROUSSEL . . . . 




Satie 




Smetana . . . . 




Strauss ... 





Q)ncerto in D major for Stringed Instruments 
(Arranged for Orchestra by Maximilian Stein- 
berg) II December 14 



Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68 
Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90 
Adagio from the String Quintet 



II December 14 
I October 26 
I October 26 



Sarabande, Gigue and Badinerie (arranged for 

String Orchestra by Ettore Pinelli) V March 8 

"La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques V March 8 

Toccata Concertante II December 14 

(Conducted by the composer) 

Symphony for Strings II December 14 

Symphony in D major, "Haffner" (K. 385) III January 18 

Suite from the Opera, "The Fairy Tale of Tsar 

I October 26 



Saltan" (After Pushkin) 
Suite in F major, Op. 33 

Two "Gym.nopedies" (Orchestrated by 

Debussy) 

"Vltava" ("The Moldau") , Symphonic 
Poem 

Suite from "Der Rosenkavalier" 



VI April 5 

V March 8 

III Januaiy' 18 
III January 18 



Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks, after the Old- 
fashioned, Roguish Manner, in Rondo 
Form VI April 5 

Capriccio, for Orchestra with Piano Solo IV Februar)' 8 
Soloist: Soulima Stravinsky 



Concerto in D for String Orchestra 



IV February 8 



Divertimento from "Le Baiser de la Fee," 

IV February 8 



Allegorical Ballet 

Ode in Three Parts, for Orchestra 

Symphony No. 4 in F minor. Op. 36 

Symphony No. 6 

"Job" — A Masque for Dancing 



Wagner Prelude to "Lohengrin" 



IV February 8 
VI April 5 

V March* 8 
III Januarv' 18 

VI April 5 



Richard Burgin conducted the concert on October 26; Thor Johnson on 
January 18; Igor Stravinsky on February 8. 



[i:i] 



of those who read it, is probably a rather vague abstraction. It would 
be more to the point to know what it meant to the composer himself. 
As a matter of fact, the months in which Tchaikovsky worked out 
this symphony he was intensely unhappy — there was indeed a dread 
shadow hanging over his life. He uses the word significantly in a 
letter to Mme. von Meek, acquainting her with his intention to 
marry a chance admirer whom he scarcely knew and did not love 
(the reason he gave to his benefactress and confidante was that he 
could not honorably withdraw from his promise). "We cannot escape 
our fate," he said in his letter, "and there was something fatalistic 
about my meeting with this girl." Even if this remark could be con- 
sidered as something more sincere than an attempt to put a face upon 
his strange actions before his friend, it is inconceivable that the un- 
fortunate episode (which according to recently published letters was 
more tragic than has been supposed) could have been identified in 
Tchaikovsky's mind with this ringing and triumphant theme.* Let 
the psychologists try to figure out the exact relation between the 
suffering man and his music at this time. It is surely a significant fact 
that this symphony, growing in the very midst of his trouble, was a 
saving refuge from it, as Tchaikovsky admits more than once. He 
never unequivocally associated it with the events of that summer, for 
his music was to him a thing of unclouded delight always, and the 
days which gave it birth seemed to him as he looked back (in a letter 
to Mme. von Meek of January 25, 1878) "a strange dream; something 
remote, a weird nightmare in which a man bearing my name, my 
likeness, and my consciousness acted as one acts in dreams: in a mean- 
ingless, disconnected, paradoxical way. That was not my sane self, 
in possession of logical and reasonable will-powers. Everything I then 
did bore the character of an unhealthy conflict between will and in- 
telligence, which is nothing less than insanity." It was his music, 
specifically his symphony to which he clung in desperation, that re- 
stored his "sane self." 



* Some connection between the symphony and Tchaikovsky's rash marriage and subsequent 
collapse is inescapable, as an outline of dates will show. It was in May^ of 1877 that he 
became engaged to Antonina Ivanovna Miliukoy. In that month, too, he completed his 
sketches for the symphony. The wedding took place on July 18, and on July 26 Tchaikovsky 
fled to Kamenko; there was a two weeks' farce of "conjugal" life at their house in Moscow 
(September 12 to 24), and the distraught composer attempted to catch a fatal cold by 
standing up to his waist in the frigid waters of the Moskva. Again the composer made a 
precipitate flight, and never saw his wife again. Barely surviving a nerve crisis which 
"bordered upon insanity," he was taken by his brother, Anatol, to Switzerland for a com- 
plete rest and change. At Kamenko in August, in a condition which made peace of mind 
impossible, he was yet able to complete the orchestration of the first movement. At I>ak6 
Geneva, as soon as he was able to take up his pen, the convalescent worked happily upon 
the remaining three movements. 

[copyrighted] 



r i6i 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evening July l6^ ^ 

J ^ J J I Extra concerts 

Sunday afternoon July 17 f (Bach-Mozart- 
Saturday evening July 23 ^ ^l^hubert) 

Sunday afternoon J^^Y 24 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28 

Saturday evening July 30 ^^ SERIES A 

Sunday afternoon July 3^ 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 "> SERIES B 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening August 1 1 

Saturday evening August 13) SERIES C 

Sunday afternoon August 14 



For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, apply at the sub- 
scription office in Symphony Hall. 




Ilaliittiin 



The Boston Symphon/s 
choice of the Baldwin Piano is clear 

evidence of its unquestioned leadership 
in richness of tone, effortless action, 

wonderful responsiveness. 
Dr. Koussevitzky says — '1t is perfection for the 

orchestra, as well as for my own use." 

THE BALDWIN PIMO COMPANY 

160 Boylston St., Boston • Eastern Hea^lquarters, 20 East 54th St., New York 
Baldwin also builds ACROSONIC, HAMILTON HOWARD pianos and fbe BALDWIN ELECTRONIC ORGAN 



Providence Programmes 




BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
I 948- I 949 

Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 

PERSONNEL 

Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 



Violins 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 
Frank Zecchino 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 

Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 

Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Artieres 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 

Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 



Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 
Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



Richard Burgix, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
First Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, October 19 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 



The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Henry B. Sawyer . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 



Philip R. Allen 
John Nicholas Brown 
Alvan T. Fuller 
Jerome D. Greene 
N. Penrose Hallowell 
Francis AV. Hatch 



M. A. De W^olfe Ho\ve 
Jacob J. Kaplan 
Roger I. Lee 
Lewis Perry 
Raymond S. Wilkins 
Oliver A\'olcott 



George E. Judd, Manager 



[t] 



live 
again 
these 
moments . . . 

reaiisticaily reproduced 
with the 



SYMPHONIANA 

Artifex Maximus 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 

FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 



PERmO Incorporated 

Chicago 26 



ARTIFEX MAXIMUS 

People who live by the sea grow to 
love the stark horizon line. In our world 
of time it speaks of eternity, it brings 
the infinite into our finite lives. For 
sixty-eight years we in Boston have 
dwelt beside an ever-sounding sea of 
music, and not we alone, for the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra has become a pos- 
session for all our people and even in 
distant lands they hear that mighty 
ocean rolling evermore. 

If it be asked what single institution 
has most sustained and enhanced the 
good name of Boston during this first 
half of the 20th century, the answer 
can only be our Orchestra. Its public 
numbers into the millions; they listen 
in the Hall, at Tanglewood, on the Es- 
planade, by radio, and to recordings; 
this Orchestra is the best there is, the 
greatest musical instrument that exists 
or ever did exist; it bears our city's 
name into the waste places and pours 
Its golden floods of sound into thirsty 
ears, and minds, and hearts. 

For the past quarter century this in- 
strument has been wielded by Serge 
Koussevitzky. Like a Stradivarius vio- 
lin which goes on improving under the 
hands of a virtuoso, the Orchestra has 
as steadily surpassed itself, 

Till those who knew it best did 
marvel most 
A hundred years ago, literature was the 
preeminent art-form in New England 
and in the United States, and New Eng- 
land led ; a century later, the preeminent 
art-form of our epoch is music, and in 
its performance the preeminent instru- 
ment is the Boston Symphony Orches- 
tra. Despite this city's private griefs and 
this century's public calamities, — two 
wars, a depression, an inflation, and 
spattered blots on the civic 'scutcheon, 
— how could the achievement of this 
institution go on calmly rising through 
change and through storm? 



[2] 



By those great Twin Brethren, to 
whom the Dorians pray, by those two 
deities who fight for us mortals and 
without whom no life is, by Faith and 
by Courage. They have reigned, and 
reign, in the foreground of podium and 
platform ; they have wrought, and work, 
equally in the background with the man- 
agement and from head to foot of the 
laboring staffs. In depression, in war- 
time, in postwar reaction, no one has 
doubted, no one has faltered, and the 
Orchestra has gone on sounding. 

"Like a cresset true, that darts its beamy 

length 
Of fiery splendor from a tower of 

strength." 

In face of evil, affirm the good. Many 
things have failed us in these past thirty 
years, but not the Orchestra, not music. 
They abide ; and to have in a community 
at one's elbow, accessible at will, a 
steady and living standard of the highest 
excellence, pouring to us the vision of 
greatness on its Niagaras of harmony 
and rhythm, makes possible a quality of 
work in other kinds which could not 
otherwise be done. 

When all the evil of these years shall 
have gone down to dusty death, when all 
the vulgarity, filth, knavery, falsehood, 
injustice, treachery, crime, and blood- 
shed shall have wreaked their worst and 
joined the vague bruit of all our yester- 
days, one good thing that will abide and 
outlast them all will be the indestruc- 
tible eternities of beauty and joy created 
for us by these men of talent working 
with humble instruments of wood, cat- 
gut, horsehair, brass, and percussion — 
humble instruments, it is true, but, serv- 
ing in the sanctuary where the spirit 
hovers upon the sightless couriers of the 
air, they are intermediaries between 
mortals and immortality. "How say you, 
then, would the heart of man once think 
it? — " No, for the Olympians ever 
move among us disguised as mortals; but 
those on whom their glances fall are 
moved to awe and wonder and they wist 
not that their faces shine. 

— Editorial in the Boston Globe, Octo- 
ber 8. 1948. 




lothes 

for 

the 

lady 

of 

discriminating 

tastes • • • 

created 

by 

famous 

designers 

for 

women 

who 

know 

and 

appreciate 

fine 

things . . . 




Boston 

Providence 

Wellesley 



[3] 




THmmc ^v£Adu Jinow 



— There is no substitute for the best. . . . For that 
reason we liave selected the finest, the leading names 
in pianos, radios, and organs. When you make a pur- 
chase from our carefully chosen stock of musical mer- 
chandise you are protected by our guarantee as Avell as 
the manufacturer's o-uarantee. We feature . . . 



THE c5^£ei/ta;/u^ piano 

KIMBALL SOHMER EVERETT 

CABLE-NELSON 



TELEVISION 
RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 

THE (X}jU/djii^£A, OROAN 



AVERY PIANO CO. 

Sole Steinway Representative in Rhode Island, 

Eastern Conn., and Fall River Territory 

256 WEYBOSSET ST. 212 THAMES ST., NEWPORT 



[4] 



Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 

T^\•o hundred and Xinetv-se^e^th Concert in Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FIRST CONCERT 

TUESDAY E\TXIXG, October 19 



Program 



Vivaldi Concerto in D minor for Orchestra 

(Edited by A. Siloti) 
I. Maestoso 
II. Largo 
III. Allegro 

Brahms Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56A 

HoNEGGER Symphony for Strings 

I. Molto moderato 
II. Adagio mesto 
III. Vivace, non troppo 

INTERMISSION 

Beethoven Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92 

I. Poco sostenuto; Vivace 

11. Allegretto 

III. Presto; Assai meno presto; Tempo primo 

IV. Allegro con brio 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

In conformance tviih City Regulations ladies are 
respectfully requested to remove their hats 



[5] 



CONCERTO IN D MINOR, Op. 3, No. 11 
By Antonio Vivaldi 

(Born about 1680 in Venice; died there in 1743) 

Transcribed for Orchestra with Organ by Alexander Siloti^ 



This is the eleventh of the set of twelve concerti grossi published by Vivaldi as 
Opus 3, under the title L'Estro armonico (Harmonic inspiration). They ap- 
peared in Amsterdam about 1714 or 1716, under the publication of Roger et le 
Cene, dedicated to Ferdinand III of Tuscany. Vivaldi wrote these concertos for four 
violins, two violas, 'cello and organ bass. The Concerto in D minor. No. 11, has 
been edited also by Sam Franko and by Dezso d'Antalffy.f The edition of Alexander 
Siloti is based directly upon Vivaldi's original manuscript. It is scored for two flutes, 
two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, contra-bassoon, organ and strings. 

The concerto in this arrangement was the opening number on Serge Kousse- 
vitzky's first program in America — at the Boston Symphony concerts of October 
10-11, 1924. 



* Alexander Siloti, pianist and conductor, was born in Kharkov, Russia, October 10, 1863. 
A pupil of Nikolas Rubinstein and Tchaikovsky (at the Moscow Conservatory), and of Liszt, 
a friend and contemporary in his youth of such musicians as Rachmaninoff and Scriabin, 
be held the experience and memory of Russia's musical past. Alexander Siloti appeared as 
piano soloist at these concerts February 4, 1898, and April 7, 1922. He died December 8, 1945. 

t D'Antalffy's transcription is for full orchestra, is based on Bach's arrangement, and exer- 
cises considerable freedom, putting the fugue at the end. This version was performed by the 
New York Philharmonic Society, February 29, 1940, John Barbirolli conducting. 




xeiro 



d-fTlu 



SIC 



Established 1910 

45 Snow Street— Providence 3, R. L GA 4833 

Publishers — Importers — Dealers 
Headquarters for the Music Profession 

CHOOSE YOUR, PI AND AS THE ARTISTS DO 

COME. IN AND BROWSE: — Band and orchestral instruments 
and music — Popular music, new and old — Music teachers' and' 
Music School supplies — RecordSi all makes, Classic, Popular and 
Jazz — Repair department. 

3S' Yearn of Continuous Service to the Music Profcssiori -^Bg^n^ 




METAL CRAFTS SHOP 

The specialty shop for things in metal 
Antique and modern copper, brass and pewter. 

Jewelry and small pieces of silver. 
Excellent metal polish, — repairing, — restoring. 

10 THOMAS STREET, PROVIDENCE, R,L 




[6] 



THIS concerto bears its story of neglect, confusion and restitution. 
The music of Vivaldi has been so. little known and regarded that 
when it was unearthed a century after his death in the State Library at 
Berlin in a copy made by Bach, many more years were destined to pass 
before it was recognized as the music of Vivaldi. 

The history of the concerto is this: Johann Sebastian Bach, probably 
in the last years of his Weimar period, evidently copied this concerto, 
according to a way he had of copying string concertos of the Italian 
master, adapting them for his own uses on the harpsichord or organ. 
Bach arranged this concerto for organ with two manuals and pedal. 
In about the year 1840, two copies in Bach's hand came to the light of 
day in the Prussian Staatshihliothek, and the concerto was circulated 
once more in the Tvorld, but this time in Bach's organ arrangement. 
It was presented by F. K. Griepenkerl in the Peters Edition at Leipzig, 
not as Vivaldi's music, not even as music of Sebastian Bach, but as the 
work of his son Wilhelm Friedemann Bach. The error is explained by 
the examination of the manuscript: The cover is missing, and at the 
top of the first page of the score, which is in the neat and unmistakable 
script of Sebastian Bach, there stands in the scrawled writing of Bach's 



For Better Luggage ^^v^i%- 

To suit the taste iNnllimA 

of the most discriminating- Hui'iMuO 

And Leather Goods ^ov^uvi^ 

From a carefully chosen selection 

VISIT 

^ n^K c^ound^ Co., Jltd. 

52 Washington Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 







Chez Elise 






ECONOMICAL EXCLUSIVEN ESS 


Suits 




Coats Dresses 


• 


2A6 


THAYER STREET, PROVIDENCE 



[71 



eldest son: Di W. F. Bach," and underneath this: "Manu mei Patris 
descriptum." Herr Griepenkerl took the line "Copied by the hand of 
my father" on its face value and supposed the concerto to be the 
original work of Friedemann Bach, not questioning why the elder Bach 
should trouble to copy his son's music, and supporting his assumption 
by pointing out that the music is plainly in the style of Wilhelm Friede- 
mann and just as plainly not in the style of his father. 

The supposed original organ concerto of Friedemann Bach had a 
long and wide vogue and further appeared in -an aiTangement for 
piano by August Stradal. It was not until 1911 that Vivaldi's author- 
ship was established. Max Schneider made the correction in the Bach 
Jahrbuch of that year.* 

The introduction to the first movement is based on broad arpeggios 
and runs by the strings against sonorous chords. There follows a fugue, 
in which Siloti doubles strings and wood winds in the various voices, 
bringing in the organ for the full chords of the climax. The second 
movement is an even-flowing Lai'go in 6-8 rhythm, subdued and con- 
templative, and so in contrast with the surrounding movements. The 
editor scores the Largo for strings only. The final Allegro again de- 
velops fast, supple figurations, mostly by the violins, roundly supported 
by successions of chords. 



* "The so-called Original Concerto in D minor of Wilhelm Friedemann Bach." 

[copyrighted] 




Sportswear 


y^ /) 


Dresses 


yf 111 


Blouses 


/ ysnt\ OnH \t?<«^ 


Suits 


THIRT€€n SOUTH flnG€LL STR€€tI 
PROVID€nC6 • RHOD€ l5LfinD» 


moderaielY 
priced 



Telephone MAnning 0506 



•HAiRDRCSSCRS 

Male Experts 
Hair Styling and Permanent Waves 
286 THAYER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



[8] 



^EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYEES' Liability Astunace Corporation Ltd. 
The EMPLOYEBS' fire /aturance Compaay 
AJfERICAN EJf PLOTEBS' Imatrmea Compamj 



E)ear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are firetraps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insureuice . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 

Your local Employers' Group insureince agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[9] 



VARIATIONS ON A THEME BY HAYDN, Op. 56a 
By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg on May 7, 1833; died at Vienna on April 3, 1897 



These variations, composed in the year 1873, were first performed at a concert 
of the Philharmonic Orchestra in Vienna, Felix Dessoff conducting, November 2, 
1873. The first performance in Boston is on record as having been given by Theo- 
dore Thomas' orchestra, January 31, 1874. 

The first performance by the Boston Symphony Orchestra took place December 5, 
1884. 

The orchestration includes two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two 
bassoons and double-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, timpani, triangle and 
strings. 

FROM the time that Schumann proclaimed Johannes Brahms in his 
twenties as a new force in music, a torch-bearer of the symphonic 
tradition, friends and foes waited to see what sort of symphony this 
"musical Messiah" would dare to submit as a successor to Beethoven's 
mighty Ninth. The "Hamburg John the Baptist" realized what was ex- 
pected of him, and after his early piano concerto, which no audience 
accepted, and his two unassuming serenades, he coolly took his time 




OF PARIS 

HAIR STYLIST 

Permanent Wave and Hair Cutting Specialist 
Put Your Head in EMILE'S Hands 

121 MED WAY STREET 
off Wayland Avenue 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
For Appointment Call Dexter 8914 



Smart Clothes . . . 



vloAllson 



i»ja 



:Kiasi4 



334 Westminster Street 



Providence 



[10] 



and let his forces gather and mature for some twenty years before yield- 
ing to the supreme test by submitting his First Symphony. This hap- 
pened in 1877. Three years earlier, he tried out his powers of orchestra- 
tion on a form less formidable and exacting than the symphony — a 
form which he had finely mastered in his extreme youth as composer 
for the piano — the theme with variations. In this, the first purely 
orchestral attempt of his maturity, Brahms, as usual when put on his 
mettle, took great pains perfectly to realize his aim. His abilities as 
orchestral colorist, so finely differentiated in each of the successive 
Variations on a Theme by Haydn, could not but be apparent even 
to its first audiences. 

At the first performance in Vienna, in November, 1873, the recep- 
tion was enthusiastic, and the critics only expressed their impatience 
that a symphony w^as not yet forthcoming from the vaunted "Bee- 
thovener." The variations were again played on December 10 in 
Miinich, under Hermann Levi. They became inevitably useful in 
Brahms' round of concerts, and added appreciably to the reputation 
of the still hesitant symphonist. 

[copyrighted] 



ROSE ROBIXSON 

House of Famous Labels 
Suits Gowns Coats Blouses 

HATTIE BARBOUR, HATS 

290 WESTMINSTER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



CURREXT BOOKS 

by some of the authors who have been at THE BOOK SHOP : 

ANGELL'S LANE, George L. Miner, $5.00 

THIS IS PROVIDENCE, photographs by Beth Murray, $1.00 

REMEMBRANCE ROCK, by Carl Sandburg, $5.00 

THE HALF-PINT JINNI AND OTHER STORIES, by 

Maurice Dolbier, $2.50 
A GHOST TOWN ON THE YELLOWSTONE by Elliot 
Paul, ?3.50 
_ , p^— WHILE BENEFIT STREET WAS YOUNG, by Margaret 

Book ShOD ^- Stillwell. $1.25 

SGrosvenoT'BinfJ/ot^ FINE FOR YOUR LIBRARY SHELVES 

j%^venoTjjuuaiR^ excellent gifts 

rrOVtdetiCIt 3,^S. (Watch for an additional list of books and authors in 

the next program) 

THE BOOK SHOP 5 GROSVENOR BUILDING 

PROVIDENCE 3, R. L 




The 



[»»] 




Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you 

a wealth of his greatest performances for encore after encore! 

Among them: 

# Symphony No. 9, in D Minor — Beethoven. With Frances Yeend, soprano; 
Ejnice Alberts, contralto; David Lloyd, tenor; James Pease, bass; 

the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus, Robert Shav/ directing, and the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. Album DM-n90, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor 
'Red Seal' De Luxe Records), $17. 

# Francesco da Rimini, Op. 32 — Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony 

Orchestra. Album DM-1179, $4.75. 

# Symphony No. 5, in B-Flat — Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra. 

Album DM-1215, $4.75. 

Prices include Federal excise tax and are subject to change without notice. 
(*'DM" and '*DV" albums also available in monuol sequence, $1 extra.) 




The newest Crestwood Is everything you've wanted in a 
radio-phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out 
unit. Rich tone of the "Golden Throat." AM, short wave, 
FM radio. Plays up to 12 records automatically. 
"Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC. Victrola 612V4. 
("Victrola"— T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. Off.) 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 



^i 



[12 1 




'A 



M HAVE YOU HEARD THE RCAV 



.^L 



ICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



[•5] 



SYMPHONY FOR STRING ORCHESTRA 
By Arthur Honegger 

Born at Le Havre, March lo, 1892 



The Symphonie pour Orchestra a Cordes is dated 1941. It was published in 1942 
with a dedication to Paul Sacher* and has been performed by him in Zurich and 
other Swiss cities. The first American performance was by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra, December 27, 1946, Charles Miinch conducting. Dr. Koussevitzky opened 
the 1947 Berkshire Festival with this Symphony on July 24, 1947, and conducted 
it in the Friday and Saturday series, October 31 and November 1, 1947. 

AT the end of the printed score is written, "Paris, October, 1941." 
Jt\ Willi Reich, writing from Basel for the Christian Science Monitor, 
May 19, 1945, remarked that the Symphony for Strings "embodies 
much of the mood of occupied Paris, to which the composer remained 
faithful under all difficulties." 

The first movement opens with an introductory Molto moderato, 
pp, with a viola figure and a premonition in the violins of things to 
come. The main Allegro brings full exposition and development. .The 
introductory tempo and material returns in the course of the move- 
ment for development on its own account and again briefly before 
the end. 

The slow movement begins with a gentle accompaniment over which 
the violins set forth the melody proper. The discourse is intensified to 
ff, and gradually subsides. 

The finale, 6/8, starts off with a lively, rondo-like theme in duple 
rhythm, which is presently replaced by another in the rhythmic 



* Paul Sacher is the conductor of the orchestra of the Collegium Musicum Zurich, founded in 
1941. It was for him and his orchestra that Richard Strauss composed his recent 
' 'Metamorphosen. ' ' 





INCORPORATED 

MANUFACTURING PHARMACISTS 
FOR MORE THAN ONE HUNDRED YEARS 



459 BOYLSTON STREET A 8 BEACON STREET 41 2' WESTMINSTER STREET 
BOSTON BOSTON PROVIDENCE 



[14] 



signature. The movement moves on a swift impulsion, passes through 
a tarantella phase, and attains a presto coda, wherein the composer 
introduces a chorale in an ad libitum trumpet part, doubling the first 
violins. (The choral theme is the composer's own.) 

M. Honegger conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra as guest. 
January 11-12, 1929, presenting his Chant de Nigamon, Prayer 
of Judith from the Opera Judith, and three songs from La Petite 
Sirene (Soloist — Cobina Wright) , Pastorale d'Ete, Horace Vic- 
torieux, Rugby, Piano Concertino (Soloist — Mme. Andree Vaurabourg 
Honegger) , Pacific 2-^-1. 

Rugby (1928) approximates Pacific 2-^-1 as a musical depiction 

of human rather than mechanical energy. The Symphony for full 

orchestra, dedicated to the Boston Symphony Orchestra on its Fiftieth 

Anniversary, was composed in 1930 and performed here February 13, 

1931. His Mouvement Symphonique No. 3 was performed at these 

concerts November 3, 1933. He has since composed a Prelude, Arioso 

et Fughette sur le nom de Bach (1933) and a Nocturne (1939) and 

Symphonic Liturgique for Orchestra, tw^o choral W'Orks in 1939: 

Nikolaus von der Flue (a Swiss national hero; this w^as performed 

in New York, May 8, 1941) and "Dance of Death" (after Holbein), 

an opera — L'Aiglon (with Ibert, 1938), incidental music to Jeanne 

d'Arc au Bucher (Paul Claudel, 1938), the ballets Le Cantique des 

Cantiques (1938), and The Call of the Mountain on an Alpine 

subject, produced in Paris in the summer of 1945. M. Honegger has 

completed his Fourth Symphony. He has composed numerous chamber 

w^orks. 

[copyrighted] 



A. W. FAIRCHILD & CO. INC. 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS & GIFTS 

ARCADE BUILDING 
PROVIDENCE 





A. S. BUNN& CO. 




GR OCERS 




273 THAYER STREET 




S.S.PIERCE ASSOCIATE 




FINE WINES & LIQUORS 




GA 1206 WE DELIVER 



[15] 



SYMPHONY NO. 7 IN A MAJOR, Op. 92 

By LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 

Born at Bonn, December 16 (?), 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827 



The Seventn Symphony, finished in the summer of 1812, was first performed on 
December 8, 1813, in the hall of the University of Vienna, Beethoven conducting. 

It is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, two horns, two 
trumpets, timpani and strings. The dedication is to Moritz Count Imperial von 

Fries. 

It would require more than a technical yardstick to measure the true 
proportions of the Seventh symphony —the sense of immensity which it 
conveys. Beethoven seems to have built up this impression by wilfully 
driving a single rhythmic figure through each movement, until the 
music attains (particularly in the body of the first movement, and in 
the Finale) a swift propulsion, an effect of cumulative growth which 
is akin to extraordinary size. 

The long introduction (Beethoven had not used one since his 
Fourth Symphony) unfolds two vistas, the first extending into a 
succession of rising scales, which someone has called "gigantic stairs," 
the second dwelling upon a melodious phrase in F major which, 
together with its accompaniment, dissolves into fragments and evapo- 
rates upon a point of suspense until the rhythm of the Vivace, which 
is indeed the substance of the entire movement, springs gently to life 
(the allegro rhythm of the Fourth Symphony was born similarly but 
less mysteriously from its dissolving introduction). The rhythm of 
the main body of the movement, once released, holds its swift course 
almost without cessation until the end. There is no contrasting theme. 
When the dominant tonality comes in the rhythm persists as in the 
opening movement of the Fifth Symphony, which this one resembles 



%^^M!Jdtd, 




OLLIDGE 

Boston and Wellesley 



Unmistakably identified with Quality . . 

your store, our store, C. Crawford Hollidge. Here you 
find first fashions first . . . individualized coats, 
suits, dresses, and the accessories with 
which to complement them. 

May we have the pleasure of showing 
our newest collections to YOUf 



[16] 



and outdoes in its pervading rhythmic ostinato, the "cellule" as 
d'Indy would have called it. The movement generates many subjects 
within its pattern, which again was something quite new in music. 
Even the Fifth Symphony, with its violent, dynamic contrasts, gave 
the antithesis of sustained, expansive motion. Schubert's great 
Symphony in C major, very different of course from Beethoven's 
Seventh, makes a similar effect of size by similar means in its Finale. 
Beethoven's rhythmic imagination is more virile. Starting from three 
notes it multiplies upon itself until it looms, leaping through every 
part of the orchestra, touching a new secret of beauty at every turn. 
Wagner called the symphony "the Dance in its highest condition; the 
happiest realization of the movements of the body in an ideal form." 
If any other composer could impel an inexorable rhythm, many times 
repeated, into a vast music — it was Wagner. 

In the Allegretto Beethoven withholds his headlong, capricious 
mood. But the sense of motion continues in this, the most agile of his 
symphonic slow movements (excepting the entirely different Allegretto 
of the Eighth). It is in A minor, and subdued by comparison, but 
pivots no less upon its rhythmic motto, and when the music changes to 
A major, the clarinets and bassoons setting their melody against triplets 
in the violins, the basses maintain the incessant rhythm. The form 
is more unvarying, more challenging to monotony than that of the 
first movement, the scheme consisting of a melody in three phrases, the 
third a repetition of the second, the whole repeated many times 
without development other than slight ornamentation and varied 
instrumentation. Even through two interludes and the fugato, the 
rhythm is never broken. The variety of the movement and its replen- 
ishing interest are astounding. No other composer could have held 
the attention of an audience for more than a minute with so rigid a 
plan. Beethoven had his first audience spellbound with his harmonic 
accompaniment, even before he had repeated it with his melody, 
woven through by the violas and 'cellos. The movement was encored 
at once, and quickly became the public favorite, so much so that 



Custom Tailored Garments for Women 

Scotch Tweed Coats, Capes and Suits made 

for women who appreciate careful tailoring 

and lovely materials. 

Choice of many attractive styles, and 
500 of the very finest Scotch Tweeds. 

Prices are reasonable, 

Romanes & Paterson 

581 Boylston Street, Boston In Copley Square 



[17] 



sometimes at concerts it was substituted for the slow movements of 
the Second and Eighth Symphonies. Beethoven was inclined, in his 
last years, to disapprove of the lively tempo often used, and spoke of 
changing the indication to Andante quasi allegretto. 

The third movement is marked simply ''presto," although it is a 
scherzo in effect. The whimsical Beethoven of the first movement is 
still in evidence, with sudden outbursts, and alternations of fortissimo 
and piano. The trio, which occurs twice in the course of the move- 
ment, is entirely different in character from the light and graceful 
presto, although it grows directly from a simple alternation of two 
notes half a tone apart in the main body of the movement. Thayer 
reports the refrain, on the authority of the Abbe Stadler, to have 
derived from a pilgrims' hymn familiar in Lower Austria. 

The Finale has been called typical of the "unbuttoned" (aufge- 
knopft) Beethoven. Grove finds in it, for the first time in his music, 
"a vein of rough, hard, personal boisterousness, the same feeling which 
inspired the strange jests, puns and nicknames which abound in his 
letters. Schumann calls it "hitting all around" (''schlagen um sich**). 
"The force that reigns throughout this movement is literally prodi- 
gious, and reminds one of Carlyle's hero Ram Dass, who had 'fire 
enough in his belly to burn up the entire world.' " Years ago the 
resemblance was noted between the first subject of the Finale and 
Beethoven's accompaniment to the Irish air "Nora Creina," which he 
was working upon at this time for George Thomson of Edinburgh.* 

It is doubtful whether a single hearer at the first performance of the 
Seventh Symphony on December 8, 1813, was fully aware of the 
importance of that date as marking the emergence of a masterpiece 
into the world. Indeed, the new symphony seems to have been looked 
upon as incidental to the general plans. The affair was a charity concert 
for war victims.f Johann Nepomuk Malzel's new invention, the 
"mechanical trumpeter," was announced to play marches "with 'full 
orchestral accompaniment," but the greatest attraction of all was 
Beethoven's new battle piece, Wellington's Victory, or the Battle of 
Vittoria, which Beethoven had designed for Malzel's "Pan-harmoni- 
can" but at the inventor's suggestion rewritten for performance by a 
live orchestra. This symphony was borne on the crest of the wave of 
popular fervor over the defeat of the army of Napoleon. When 



* In an interesting article, "Celtic Elements in Beethoven's Seventh Symphony" (MusiccU 
Quarterly, July, 1935), James Travis goes so far as to claim: "It is demonstrable that the 
themes, not of one, but of all four movements of the Seventh Symphony owe rhythmic and 
melodic an.d even occasional harmonic elements to Beethoven's Celtic studies." 

However plaiisibly Mr. Travis builds his case, basing his proofs vtpon careful notation, 
it is well to remember that others these many years have dived deep into this symphony in 
pursuit of special connotations, always with doubtful results. D'Indy, who called it a "pastoral" 
symphony, and Berlioz, who found the scherzo a ''ronde des paysans^" are among them. The 
industrious seekers extend back to Dr. Carl Iken, who described in the work a revolution, 
fully hatched, and brought from the composer a sharp rebuke. Never did he evolve a more 
purely musical scheme. 

t The proceeds were devoted to the "Austrians and Bavarians wounded at Hanau" in 
defense of their country against Napoleon (once revered by Beethoven). 

[18] 



Wellington's Victory was performed, with its drums and fanfares and 
God Save the King in fugue, it resulted in the most sensational 
popular success Beethoven had until then enjoyed. The Seventh 
Symphony, opening the programme, was well received, and the 
Allegretto was encored. The new symphony was soon forgotten when 
the English legions routed once more in tone the cohorts of Napoleon's 
brother in Spain. 

Although the Seventh Symphony received a generous amount of 
applause, it is very plain from all the printed comments of the time 
that on many in the audience the battle symphony made more of an 
impression than would have all of the seven symphonies put together. 
The doubting ones were now ready to accede that Beethoven was a 
great composer after all. Even the discriminating Beethoven enthusi- 
asts were impressed. When the Battle of Vittoria was repeated, the 
applause, so wrote the singer Franz Wild, "reached the highest ecstasy," 
and Schindler says: "The enthusiasm, heightened by the patriotic 
feeling of those memorable days, was overwhelming." This music 
brought the composer directly and indirectly more money than 
anything that he had written or was to write. 

The initial performance of the Symphony, according to Spohr, was 
"quite masterly," a remark, however, which must be taken strictly 
according to the indifferent standards of his time, rather than our own. 
The open letter which the gratified Beethoven wrote to the Wiener 
Zeitung thanked his honored colleagues "for their zeal in contributing 
to so exalted a result." The letter was never published, and Thayer 
conjectures that the reason for its withdrawal was Beethoven's sudden 
quarrel with Malzel, whom he had singled out in this letter with 
particular thanks for giving him the opportunity "to lay a work of 
magnitude upon the altar of the Fatherland." 

The concert was repeated on Sunday, December 12, again with full 
attendance, the net receipts of the two performances amounting to 
4,000 florins, which were duly turned over to the beneficiaries. 
Schindler proudly calls this "one of the most important movements in 
the life of the master, in which all the hitherto divergent voices save 
those of the professional musicians united in proclaiming him worthy 



f 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

MUSIC RESEARCH LABORATORY by NICOLAS SLONIMSKY 
A weekly seminar for two hours Monday afternoons at 4 p.m. The purpose 
is to quicken music appreciation and to recognize and label various musical 
phenomena; also to examine musical problems of today, modern composi- 
tion, musical lexicography, and national music in all countries. 
For further information, apply to the Dean. 
290 Huntington Av'enue, Boston, Mass. 

[ 19 ] 



of the laurel. A work like the Battle Symphony had to come in order 
that divergent opinions might be united and the mouths of all op- 
ponents, of whatever kind, be silenced." Tomaschek was distressed that 
a composer with so lofty a mission should have stooped to the "rude 
materialism" of such a piece. "I was told, it is true, that he himself 
declared the work to be folly, and that he liked it only because with 
it he had thoroughly thrashed the Viennese." Thayer assumes that 
Beethoven's musical colleagues who aided in the performance of the 
work "viewed it as a stupendous musical joke, and engaged in it con 
amove as in a gigantic professional frolic." 

The Seventh Symphony had a third performance on the second of 
January, and on February 27, 1814, it was performed again, together 
with the Eighth Symphony. Performances elsewhere show a somewhat 
less hearty reception for the Seventh Symphony, although the Alle- 
gretto was usually immediately liked and was often encored. 
Friedrich Wieck, the father of Clara Schumann, was present at the 
first performance in Leipzig, and recollected that musicians, critics, 
connoisseurs and people quite ignorant of music, each and all were 
unanimously of the opinion that the Symphony — especially the first 
and last movements — could have been composed only in an unfor- 
tunate drunken condition (''trunkenen Zustdnde") . 

[copyrighted] 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLETS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



Jones Warehouses, Inc. 

For more than 50 years rendering an exceptionally fine 
service in Furniture Storage, and in Dependable Moving, 
both local and long distance. 

59 CENTRAL ST., PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

"Rh^de Island's Largest Household Storage Firm" 



[20] 



METROPOLITAN THEATRE PROVIDENCE 

Season 1948— 1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 

Five Tuesday Evening Concerts at 8:30 

Remaining concerts: November 16, February 1, 
March 1, March 29 

Remaining Single tickets for the November 16 concert will be 
on sale beginning Wednesday, November 10, at the Avery Piano 
Co., 256 Weybosset St., Providence. 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Ch\mbi.rs 
246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani. Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-61ii0 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

[21] 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SCHEDULE OF CONCERTS, Season 1948-1949 



OCTOBI 


:r 




18 


Cambridge 


(3) 


5 


Wellesley 




21-22 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XIII) 


8-9 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. I) 


23 


Boston 


(Sun. d) 


12 


Boston 


(Tues. A) 


25 


Boston 


(Tues. F) 


15-16 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. II) 


28-29 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XIV) 


19 


Providence 


(0 








22-23 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. Ill) 


FEBRUARY 




24 


Boston 


(Sun. a) 








26 


Cambridge 


(1) 


1 


Providence 


(3) 


29-30 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. IV) 


4-5 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XV) 








8 


Cambridge 


(4) 


NOVEMBER 




11-12 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XVI) 


2 


Boston 


(Tues. B) 


16 


New York 


(Wed. 3) 


5-6 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. V) 


17 


Newark 


(1) 


9 


New Haven 


(0 


18 


Brooklyn 


(3) 


10 


Ne^v York 


(Wed. 1) 


19 


New York 


(Sat. 3) 


11 


Hunter College 




22 


Boston 


(Tues. G) 


12 


Brooklyn 


(0 


25-26 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XVII) 


13 


New York 


(Sat. 1) 


27 


Boston 


(Sun. e) 


16 


Providence 


(2) 








19-20 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. VI) 


MARCH 






21 


Boston 


(Sun. b) 


1 


Providence 


(4) 


23 


Boston 


(Tues. C) 


4-f> 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. X\'III) 
(5) 


26-27 


Boston 
Pittsburgh 


(Fri.-Sat. VII) 


8 


Cambridge 


30 




11-12 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XIX) 


DECEMBER 




14 


Hartford 










15 


Ne^v Haven 


(2) 


1 
2 


Cleveland 
Cincinnati 




16 
17 


NcAV York 
Newark 


(Wed. 4) 

(2) 


3 

5 
6 


Chicago 
Milwaukee 
Ann Arbor 




18 

19 
22 


Brooklyn 
Ne^v York 
Boston 


\ / 

(4) 

(Sat. 4) 
(Tues. H) 


7 
8 


Detroit 
Rochester 




25-26 
27 
29 


Boston 
Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XX) 
(Pension Fund) 

(5) 


10-11 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. VIII) 


Providence 


14 


Cambridge 


(2) 




17-18 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. IX) 


APRIL 






21 


Boston 


(Tues. D) 








22-23 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. X) 


1-2 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XXI) 


28 


Boston 


(Pension Fund) 


5 


Cambridge 


(6) 


31-Jan. 


1 Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XI) 


8-9 
12 


Boston 
Philadelphia 


(Fri.-Sat. XXII) 


JANUARY 




13 


New York 


(Wed. 5) 


2 


Boston 


(Sun. c) 


14 


Ne^v Brunswick 




4 


Boston 


(Tues. E) 


15 


Brooklyn 


(5) 


7-8 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XII) 


16 


New York 


(Sat. 5) 


11 


Springfield 




19 


Boston 


(Tues. I) 


12 


New York 


(Wed. 2) 


22-23 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XXIII) 


13 


Washington 




24 


Boston 


(Sun. f) 


14 


Brooklyn 


(2) 


26 


Boston 


(Spec, concert) 


15 


New York 


(Sat. 2) 


29-30 


Boston 


(Fri.-Sat. XXIV) 



[22] 



PROVIDENCE MUSIC TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



ARTHUR EINSTEIN 

PIANIST 

Former Professor of Piano at the Odessa Conservatory (Russia) 

Studies: i6 Conrad Bldg., 349 Morris Avenue 

Phone: GA 11 44 




CONCERT PIANIST 
State Accredited 

Graduate and Teacher of Dr. Hoch's 
Conservatory, Frankfort, Germany 

Individual' Lessons 
Two Pianoforte Ensemble 



160 IRVING AVE. 



DE 5667 



FRANK E. STREETER 

PIANO and ENSEMBLE . 

Studio, 26 CONRAD BUILDING 3 

Residence, 120 Williams Ave., East Providence, R, I. 14 

ALBERT WATERMAN 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 

170 MED WAY STREET Plantations 0226 

MONDAY MORNING MUSICAL CLUB STUDIOS 

SEASON 1948-1949 



LYDIA BELL MORRIS, piano, Monday and 
Tuesday afternoons. 

BERTHA WOODWARD, piano, voice. 
Monday, Friday, and Saturday afternoons. 

IRENE MULICK, piano, Monday, Tuesday, 
and Saturday mornings. 



ELSIE LOVELL HANKINS, voice. Tuesday 
and Wednesday all day. 

BEATRICE WARDEN ROBERTS, piano, 
voice, Wednesday and Saturday all day. 

BEATRICE BALL BATTEY, violin, Thursday 
afternoon. 



AGNES COUTANCHE BURKE, voice, Friday afternoon 

Mason & Hamlin and Steinway Grand Pianos 

Studios available for small recitals and 2-piano practice 

Apply to Studio secretary for information between 11 and i 

63 WASHINGTON ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. MA 2318 



[23] 



^^ ^.'-^^<^:.^,: 









1feW^^^;iy*^ ^ 















.-W. ^v^w^. /^Ifc .^ ^ %'■ '^ ^ -^SP^ 









h 



(J 

o 

o 



"^ c 
•S *c« 

4-1 *J 

— o 

6 

3 



0^ m 



^'t****! 
# 



CO 

X 



a 

Sd 
o 

o 

Cm 



C 

'be 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^^°\^2'if^7J'^^^^ 

Bach, C, P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 1, 2, 3, 4 

Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3, 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Sal6n Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto No. 12), Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No, 3 

Harris . Symphony No. 3 

Hnydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto ( Soloist : William Kapell ) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 ("Italian") 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) : E-flat (184) : C major 

(388) : Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony ; Violin Concerto No. 2 (Heifetz) ; 

"Lieutenant Kije," Suite ; "Love for Three Oranges." 
Scherzo and March : "Peter and the Wolf" ; "Romeo 
and Juliet," Suite : Symphony No. 5 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" ; "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "tjnfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 : "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symnhony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring." "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio ( Sanroma ) : Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5. 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia. "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivsildi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 




m^(^ 



by richness of tone, 
eifortless action ^ 
responsiveness. 



ptalimin 



THE CHOICE OF GREAT CONDUCTOR 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

Serge Koussevitzky — Boston Symphony — 
Baldwin . . . what a trio in the musical cul- 
ture of America! His preference for Baldwin 
is praise indeed: "A great work of musical art 
... a truly orchestral tone, round, full and of 
magnificent resonance and color! . . . For the 
orchestra, as well as for my own use, the 
Baldwin is PERFECTION." 

We have set aside a Baldwin for you to try. 
Come in and hear it! 



BALDWIN ALSO BUILDS ACROSONIC, HAMILTON AND HOWARD PIANOS 

THE BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY 

In Providence: AXELROD-MUSIC CO., 45 Snow Street 

Eastern Headquarters: — 20 EAST 54TH STREET. NEW YORK CITY 









fi 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
1948-1949 

Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 
PERSONNEL 
Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 



Violins 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 
Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 
Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 

Norman Carol 
Carlos Pinfield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 
Frank Zecchino 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 
Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 
George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van \V^ynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 



Contra -Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem \'alkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
El ford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



■<^^^i^^ 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Mw5z'c Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Second Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, November 16 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The TRUSTEES of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De W^olfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver ^\^oLcoTT 

George E. Judd, Manager 



[i] 



live 
again 
these 
moments . . . 

realistically reproduced 
with the 




AT -YOUR DEALER'S—A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme. $2.50 

Fidelitone Master. 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe. . 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 



PERMO 



Incorporated 

Chicago -26 



G. B. S. DISCUSSES 

ORCHESTRAL BALANCE 

(From the New York Times, 
November 7, 1948) 

A music critic before he was a drama 
critic and playwright, G. B. Shaw has 
never lost his affection for the tonal 
art. Nor, for that matter, his capacity 
for strong opinions trenchantly ex- 
pressed. In the British press recently 
there has been a discussion of the texture 
of orchestral bass, and Mr. Shaw has 
been taking part in the debate. Here is 
a letter from him that appeared in 
The Times of London last month: 

"It would be a pity to let this cor- 
respondence drop without emphasizing 
the ever-pressing need for remedying 
the weakness of the orchestral bass. I 
do not greatly care whether recitativo 
secco is accompanied by scrapes of the 
'cello or by piano or harpsichord. I 
should rather like to hear the tromba 
marina; but I shall lose no sleep if 
I do not. Seventy years ago I filled up 
the figured basses in Stainer's textbook 
of harmony quite correctly. Any fool 
could, even were he deafer than Bee- 
thoven. 

"What has worried me through all 
these years is that I could never hear 
Beethoven's No. 3 'Leonore' Overture 
as he meant me to hear it; and I never 
shall until his florid basses can hold 
their own against the thunder of the 
full orchestra fortissimo. When his im- 
petuous figuration rushes down from 
top to bottom of the orchestra, the first 
half of it rings out brilliantly and the 
rest is a senseless blare. When the bass 
should tremble and rattle, nothing is 
heard but a noisy growl and a thump. 

"I have inquired again and again how 
the bass could be made audible. Elgar 
thought it could be done by a group of 
Belgian trombones with five valves 
which enabled them to play the most 
florid passages prestissimo. But the 
ophicleide, a giant-keyed bugle with a 
peculiar tone which moved Berlioz to 
denounce it as a chromatic bullock, is 
as agile as five valves can make (and 
spoil) the trombone. My uncle played 
it, so I know. 

"The expense of extra players daunts 
many conductors ; I know one who, when 
he pleaded to the municipality for third 



[8] 



and fourth horns, was told to make the 
first and second play twice as loud. But 
nowadays, when Wagner in 'The Dusk 
of the Gods' and Strauss in 'Hero Life' 
require eight horns, and bass clarinets, 
English horns, hexelphones, and other 
luxuries undreamt of by Beethoven have m 
to be available for every callow com- 
poser, the B.B.C. can afford to damn 
the expense. 

"The purists who want the original 
score and nothing but the score, not 
even the music, have no case. Elgar de- 
fended Mozart's rescoring of 'The Mes- 
siah' on the ground that Handel at the V 
organ could improvise equivalent des- Y". 
cants and harmonies (and who can be- ' , 
lieve that in 'The people that walked in ?'■ 
darkness' he played only the written |=. 
unisons and hollow octaves in the \ 
score?) ; but I am all for the replace- fo- 
ment of Mozart's clarinet parts by \ 
the new Bach trumpet on which they \,^ 
are no longer unplayable. Trumpeters :• , 
in Mozart's time were a bumptious lot: \ 
he hated them and loved the clarinet. \ 
Wagner had to rescore passages in the i 
Ninth Symphony to bring out the parts \/ 
that Beethoven evidently meant to be ^ 
prominent, but which, great master of r' 
the orchestra as he was, he was too ':^' 
deaf to balance for himself. Schumann ^ 
was no such master: nobody has yet 
complained of Mahler's rescoring of his 
symphonies. But it is the Beethoven % 
basses above all that I want to hear; 
and we have not heard them yet." 



Conductor's Comment 

Dimitri Mitropoulos, current con- 
ductor of the New York Philharmonic- 
Symphony, was asked by that organiza- 
tion's press department what he thought 
of Mr. Shaw's views, and he penned this 
comment: 

"Certainly Mr. G. B. S. is right. There 
are lots of places in Beethoven's music 
where one doesn't hear the basses. I 
will mention an even more helpless 
place — the end of the Fifth Symphony. 

"As far as the Leonore is concerned, 
the only way to solve that problem — 
and this is the way I do it — is to make 
the brasses and winds more careful in 
their fortes during that passage, and 
then it will come all right." 



^,. 



ta- 



P- 




things . . • 




Boston 

Providence 

Wellesley 



[S] 




1 



Tyiii&juL ^^ovsoibu Jinjow 



— ■ There is no substitute for the best. . . . For that 
reason we have selected the finest, the leading names 
in pianos, radios, and organs. When you make a pur- 
chase from our carefully chosen stock of musical mer- 
chandise you are protected by our guarantee as well as 
the manufacturer's guarantee. We feature . . . 



THE Stii^UtWW^ PIANO 

KIMBALL SOHMER EVEREH 

CABLE-NELSON 



TELEVISION 

RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 
THE U)UhUipi/U ORGAN 



AVERY PIAXO CO. 

Sole Steinway Representative in Rhode Island, 

Eastern Conn., and Fall River Territory 

256 WEYBOSSET ST. 212 THAMES ST., NEWPORT 



(4] 



Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 
Tuesday Evening, NovemlDer l6 

Dr. Koussevitzky is prevented "by illness from 
conductinF^ tonight's concert, 
Richard Bur^^^in will conduct. 



Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 

Two hundred and Ninety-eighth Concert in Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SECOND CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, November i6, at 8:30 o'clock 



Program 



Weber Overture to "Euryanthe" 

Brahms Symphony No. 3 in F major, Op. 90 

I. Allegro con brio 

II. Andante 

III. Poco allegretto 
IV. Allegro 

INTERMISSION 

Bruckner Adagio from the String Quintet 

RiMSKY-KoRSAKOV Suitc from the Opera, "The fair)' Tale 

of Tsar Saltan" (After Pushkin) 
I. Allegretto alia marcia 
II. Introduction to Act II 

IV. The Three Wonders (Introduction to last scene) 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

In conformance with City Regulations ladies are 
respectfully requested to remove their hats 



[5] 



BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 

Serge Koussevitzky, Music Director 

October 5, 1948 
Dear Mr. Taft: 

You have asked how you and other devoted members 
of the Friends of the Orchestra can express to me in 
tangible form your "appreciation and gratitude" on my 
twenty-fifth anniversary as Conductor. Truly there is only 
one way in which I would wish you to do this — by a 
gift to the Orchestra, a big gift. 

World conditions are so uncertain and conditions here 
are so unsettled that even such an institution as the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra, with all its maturity, fine 
traditions and high ideals, is vulnerable. Its permanence 
should be insured. You and the Trustees will know best 
how this should be accomplished. 

I would consider it the finest of all personal tributes 
if my friends should take this occasion to give convincing 
proof that this splendid orchestra to which I have de- 
voted my best efforts for nearly a quarter of a century 
shall never* flounder or fall through lack of adequate 
financial support. 

Faithfully yours. 




[6] 



OVERTURE TO "EURYANTHE" 
By Carl Maria \'on "Weber 

Born at Eutin, Oldenburg, December 18, 1786; died at London, June 5, 1826 



IT was in 1823 that ^Veber completed ''Enryanthe," his "grand heroic- 
romantic" opera for Domenico Barbaja, manager of the Karnth- 
nerthor Theater at Vienna, who had a hopeful eye upon a success com- 
parable to that of *'Der Freischiitz." There is every evidence that 
Weber was ambitious for his work and spared no pains with it, 
"Euryanthe" was his longest opera, lasting, as first performed, four 
hours. Unlike ''Der Freischiitz," it had a continuous musical score 
with no interruptions of spoken dialogue. Weber completed the score 
without the Overture on August 29, 1823, ^^^ began at once to com- 
pose the Overture, which was not ready until October 19, six days 
before the first performance. On the day following the event, October 
26, the composer wrote to his wdfe: "My reception, when I appeared 
in the orchestra, was the most enthusiastic and brilliant that' one could 
imagine. There was no end to it. At last I gave the signal for the 
beginning. Stillness of death. The Overture was applauded madly; 



For Better Luggage ♦^S^f^ 

To suit the taste |NnllUf\o 

of the most discriminating — |||j^ hTuv 

And Leather Goods '^^ITde.^^ 

From a carefully chosen selection 

VISIT 

!ZZ H/K <cJ\ound± Go.f Jlta. 

52 Washington Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Chez Elise 

ECONOMICAL EXCLUSI VEN ESS 

Suits Coats Dresses 

246 THAYER STREET, PROVIDENCE 



[7] 



there Avas a demand for a repetition; but I went ahead, so that the 
performance might not be too long drawn out." Yet the success was 
not unqualified; the printed reports were not all favorable. The li- 
bretto in particular was generally denounced as needlessly involved. 
The opera held the stage for hardly more than twenty performances 
in the season. There are degrees of success, and such was the case in 
Vienna in 1823. Schubert, whose "Rosamunde," to a text by the 
same librettist, Helmina von Chezy, was mounted on December 20 
of the same season had reason to envy "Euryanthe," for "Rosamunde" 
did not survive two performances. Beethoven, who was in Vienna and 
had a long and cordial meeting with Weber at the timxC, also envied 
him his undoubted instinct for the theater as evidenced in the score 
of ''Der Freischiitz/' which he had studied with exclamations of 
wonderment. 

The overture, after an opening in the characteristic fiery Weberian 
manner, discloses a theme from Adolar's ''Ich hau' auf Gott und meine 
Euryanth' " (Act I) set forth by the wind choirs. The second theme 
(violins) is from Adolar's aria "Wehen mir liifte Ruh' " (Act II) . 
After a pause of suspense, the composer introduces a largo of fifteen 
measures, pianissimo, for violins, muted and divided, with a tremolo 
in the violas. It is an eerie music intended to suggest the scene of the 




xeir 



od-fTlu 



SIC 



Established 1910 

45 Snow Street — Providence 3, R. I. GA 4833 

Publishers — Importers — Dealers 

Headquarters for the Music Profession 

jBafttoln 1^ ^m^ 

CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARTISTS DO 

COME IN AND BROWSE :— Band and orchestral instruments 
and music — Popular music, new and old — Music teachers' and 
Music School supplies — Records, all makes. Classic, Popular and 
Jazz — Repair department. 



38 Years of Continuous Service to the Music Profession 




METAL CRAFTS SHOP 

The specialty shop for things in tnetal 
Antique and modern copper, brass and pewter. 

Jewelry and small pieces of silver. 
Excellent metal polish, — repairing, — restoring. 

10 THOMAS STREET, PROVIDENCE, R.L 




[8] 



sepulchre. AV^eber proposed, but abandoned, the idea of having the 
curtain raised in the midst of the overture to reveal the following 
tableau: "The interior of Emma's tomb. A kneeling statue of her is 
beside the coffin, which is surmounted by a twelfth-century haldacchino 
[canopy]. Euryanthe prays by the coffin, while the spirit of Emma 
hovers overhead. Eglantine looks on." In a fiigato of the development, 
the first theme is inverted. The lyrical second theme brings the 
conclusion. 

[copyrighted] 



^E)G^ 



Sportswear 
Dresses 
Blouses 

o<j^ Ckq I o€««i!(U^ Suits 

THiRT€€n SOUTH flnG€LL STR€€T I modexately 

PROVID€nC€ • RHOD€ ISLflnD* DTlCed 





Telephone MAnning 0506 



(ii )atel8.B)«t(JalCs 

•HAIRDReSSCRS 

Male Experts 
Hair Styling and Permanent Waves 
286 THAYER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

[9] 



SYMPHONY NO. 3, IN F MAJOR, Op. go 

By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, 1897 



Composed in 1883, the Third Symphony was first performed at a concert of the 
Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra, December 2, 1883, Hans Richter conducting. The 
first American performance was in New York, October 24, 1884, at a Novelty Con- 
cert by Mr. Van der Stucken. The first performance in Boston was by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, under Wilhelm Gericke, on November 8, 1884. 

The Symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons 
and contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings. 

THE world which had waited so many years for Brahms' First Sym- 
phony was again aroused to a high state of expectancy when six 
years elapsed after the Second, before a Third was announced as 
written and ready for performance. It was in the summer of 1883, at 
Wiesbaden, that Brahms (just turned fifty) completed the symphony 
which had occupied him for a large part of the previous year. 
Brahms, attending the rehearsals for the first performance, in Vienna, 
expressed himself to Biilow as anxious for its success, and when 
after the performance .1 was proclaimed in print as by far his best 




OF PARIS 

HAIR STYLIST 

Permanent Wave and Hair Cutting Specialist 
Put Your Head in EMILE'S Hands 

121 MED WAY STREET 
off Wayland Avenue 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
For Appointment Call Dexter 8914 



Smart Clothes . . . 



9t„«*- 




ia9wuu:i*]sia4 



334 Westminster Street * * - Providence 

[10] . . 



work, he was angry, fearing that the public would be led to expect 
too much of it, and would be disappointed. He need not have 
worried. Those who, while respecting the first two symphonies, had 
felt at liberty to weigh and argue them, were now completely con- 
vinced that a great symphonist dwelt among them; they were only 
eager to hear his new score, to probe the beauties -which they knew 
would be there. The Vienna premiere was a real occasion. There was 
present what Kalbeck called the "Wagner-Bruckner ecclesia militans,*' 
whose valiant attempt at a hostile demonstration was quite ignored 
and lost in the general enthusiasm. For the second performance, which 
was to be in Berlin, Brahms made conflicting promises to Wiillner 
and Joachim. Joachim won the honor and Brahms repeated the new 
symphony, with Wiillner's orchestra, three times in Berlin, in the 
month of January. Biilow at Meiningen would not be outdone, and 
put it twice upon the same programme. City after city approached 
Brahms for a performance, and even from France, which to this day 
has remained tepid to Brahms, there came an invitation from the 
Societe des Concerts modernes over the signature of Benjamin Godard. 
When the work was published in 1884 (at an initial fee to the com- 
poser of $g,ooo), it was performed far and wide. 

If the early success of the Third Symphony was in some part a 



ROSE ROBIXSON 

House of Famous Labels 
Suits Gowns Coats Blouses 

HATTIE BARBOrR HATS 

290 WESTMINSTER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 




The 



CURRENT BOOKS 

by some of the authors who have been at THE BOOK SHOP : 

ANGELL'S LANE, George L. Miner, $5.00 

THIS IS PROVIDENCE, photographs by Beth Murray, $1.00 

REMEMBRANCE ROCK, by Carl Sandburg, $5.tO 

THE HALF-PINT JINNI AND OTHER STORIES, by 

Maurice Dolbier, $2.50 
A GHOST TOWN ON THE YELLOWSTONE by EUiot 

Paul, ?3.50 
WHILE BENEFIT STREET WAS YOUNG, by Margaret 



Book Shoo B- Stillwell. $1.25 

SGroSVenorSuifd/nA ^^^E FOR YOUR library SHELVES 

a!^ ., !> !n <^ EXCELLENT GIFTS 

rrOVldehCe OtJi.l. (Watch for an additional list of books and authors in 

the next program) 

THE BOOK SBOP 5 GROSVENOR BUILDING 
^ PROVIDENCE 3, R. L 

[11] 




# * 




Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, they bring you a wealth of tbei 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• "Classical" Symphony in D, Op. 25— Prokofleff. Serge Koussevitzlcy conducing* 
Symphony Orchestra. DM-1241, $3.50. In manual sequence, $1 extra. 

• Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80 — Brahms. Serge Koussevitzky conducting the 
Symphony Orchestra. Record 12-0377, $1.25. 

• Der Hirt auf dem Felsen (The Shepherd on the Mountain)— MiJIIer-Schubert. D<w 
with George Schick, Pianist; David Oppenheim, Clarinet obbligato. Record 12-01 

• Standchen (Serenade), and Liebesbotschoft (Love's Message) — Rellstab-Schubert. 
Dorothy Maynor, with George Schick at the piano. Record 10-1372, $1. 

Prices include Federal excise tax and are subject to change without notice. 



The newest Crestwood is everything you've wanted in o radio- 
phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out unit. Rich 
tone of the >'Golden Throat." AM, short wave, FM radio. Plays up to 
12 records automatically. -Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC 
Victrola 612V4. ("Victrolo"- T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. Off) 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 



On nil 



HAVE 



r 12] 



KOUSSEVITZKY 



25. 




MAYNOR 



OUHIAIO THE BCA VICI0 8 SHOW? SUNDAY AflElNOONS OVfl NIC 

I 'Si 



succes d'estime, the music must also have made its way by its own 
sober virtues. Certainly Brahms never wrote a more unspectacular, 
personal symphony. In six years' pause, the composer seemed to have 
taken stock of himself. The romantic excesses which he had absorbed 
from Beethoven and Schumann, he toned down to a fine, even glow, 
which was far truer to the essential nature of this self-continent dreamer 
from the north country. The unveiled sentiment to which, under the 
shadow of Beethoven, he had been betrayed in the slow movement 
of his First Symphony, the open emotional proclamation of its final 
pages; the Schumannesque lyricism of the Second Symphony, its sunlit 
orchestration and clear, long-breathed diatonic melody, the festive 
trumpets of its Finale — these inherited musical traits were no longer 
suitable to the now fully matured symphonic Brahms. His brass hence- 
forth was to be, if not sombre, at least subdued; his emotionalism more 
tranquillized and innig; his erstwhile folklike themes subtilized into a 
more delicate and personal idiom. In other words, the expansive, 
sturdy, the militantly bourgeois Brahms, while outwardly unchanged, 
had inwardly been completely developed into a refined poet quite 
apart from his kind, an entire aristocrat of his art. 

"The peculiar, deep-toned luminosity" of the F major Symphony 
was the result, so it can be assumed, of that painstaking industry 





^c'n/ 



INCORPORATED 

ESTABLISHED 1840 



MAKERS OF EMAGRIN TABLETS FOR THE RELIEF OF PAIN, 
ESPECIALLY TO REDUCE DISCOMFORT OR FEVER RESULTING 
FROM SIMPLE HEADACHES, NEURALGIAS AND COMMON COLDS 

459 BOYLSTON STREET As BEACON STREET 41? WESTMINSTER STREET 

BOSTON BOSTON PROVIDENCE 



A. W. FAIRCHILD & CO. INC. 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS & GIFTS 

ARCADE BUILDING 
PROVIDENCE 



[14] 



which was characteristic of Brahms, and there is circumstantial con- 
firmation in the manuscript score which is in the possession of Dr. 
Jerome Stonborough in Vienna. Karl Geiringer has examined the 
manuscript and* his description of it is among the fund of valuable 
matter divulged in the writer's "Brahms: His Life and Work." 

"It shows a large number of small pencilled revisions in the orches- 
tration, which the master probably made during the rehearsals. Thus, 
for instance, the change of the clarinets in the first movement, from 
B-flat to A, was not originally planned; and for the second movement 
Brahms wanted to make use of trumpets and drums, but subsequently 
dispensed with these, as not conforming with the mood of the Andante. 
On the other hand, the bassoons, and the trumpets and drums of the 
Finale, were later additions. Such meticulous consideration of the 
slightest subtleties of orchestral colouring belies the thoughtlessly re- 
peated catchword that Brahms was not greatly interested in the prob- 
lems of instrumentation." 

"Like the first two symphonies, the Third is introduced by a 
'motto,' " * also writes Geiringer; "this at once provides the bass for 



* F-A-F. "The best known of his germ-motives" (Robert Haven Schauffler: "The Unknown 
Brahms"), "was a development of his friend Joachim's personal motto F-A-E. This stood 
for Fret aber einsam (Free but lonely), which young Johannes naodified for his own use 
into F-A-F, Frei aber froh (Free but glad). The apparent illogicality of this latter motto 
used to puzzle me. Why free but glad ? Surely there should be no 'if s' or 'buts' to the happi- 
ness conferred by freedom 1 Later, however, when I learned of ffrahms' peasant streak, the 
reason for the 'but' appeared. According to the Dithmarsh countryman's traditional code, a 
foot-free person without fixed duties or an official position should go bowed by the guilty 
feeling that he is no better than a vagabond. Brahms the musician was able to conquer this 
conventional sense of inferiority, but Brahms the man — never." 




100 
PROOF 



rO KENTUCKY HOSPITALITY 

ONE key turns in the door of a gracious 
Kentucky home. The other key unlocks to 
your enjoyment the favorite Bonded Bour- 
bon of Kentuckians... robust in flavor, with 
distinctive bouquet. Enjoy the genuine sour 
mash Bourbon Kentuckians prefer. Ask for 
OLD FITZGERALD today. 



OLD FASHIONED...^^,<j^i^.^,,^ 

OIDFITZGEMID 



[15] 



the grandiose principal subject of the first movement, and dominates 
not only this movement, but the whole Symphony. It assumes a par- 
ticularly important role in the first movement, before the beginning 
of the recapitulation. After the passionate development the waves of 
excitement calm down, and the horn announces the motto, in a mystic 
E-flat major, as a herald of heavenly peace. Passionless, clear, almost 
objective serenity speaks to us from the second movement. No Andante 
of such emotional tranquillity is to be found in the works of the 
youthful Brahms. Particularly attractive is the first theme of the fol- 
lowing Poco Allegretto, which (in spite of its great simplicity) is 
stamped with a highly individual character by its constant alternation 
of iambic and trochaic rhythms. Further, Brahms contrived to make 
the concise threefold form of the work more effective by orchestrating 
the da capo of the first part in quite a different manner. Such a 
mixture of simplicity and refinement is characteristic of Brahms in his 
later years. The Finale is a tremendous conflict of elemental forces; 
it is only in the Coda that calm returns. Like a rainbow after a thun- 
derstorm, the motto, played by the flute, with its message of hope and 
freedom, spans the turmoil of the other voices." 

Walter Niemann stresses the major-minor character of the sym- 
phony, pointing how the F major of the first movement and the 
dominant C major of the second is modified to C minor in the third, 
and F minor in long jx)rtions of the Finale. This is the procedure by 
which Brahms' "positive vital energy is limited by strongly negative 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

Four Year Degree Course Three Year Diploma Course 

Artist's Diploma One Year Preliminary Course Master's Degree 

Courses arranged for special students 

For further information, write the Dean 

290 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. 



"feU^Afl/ c ^ytrf , 




lloLLIDGE 

■ ■ Boston and Wellesley 



Unmistakably identified with Quality . • • 

your store, our store, C. Crawford Hollidge. Here you 
find first fashions first . . . individualized coats, 
suits, dresses, and the accessories with 
which to complement them. 

May we have the pleasure of showing 
our newest collections to YOU? 



[16] 



factors, by melancholy and pessimism. ... It is these severe, inward 
limitations, which have their source in Brahms' peculiarly indetermi- 
nate 'Moll-Duf nature, that have determined the course of the 'psy- 
chological scheme' [innere Handlung] of this symphony." Thus is 
Brahms the "first and only master of the 'Dur-MolV mode, the master 
of resignation." 

As elsewhere in Brahms' music, this symphony has called forth from 
commentators a motley of imaginative flights. Hans Richter, its first 
conductor, named it Brahms' "Eroica," a label which has clung to it 
ever since. Kalbeck traced its inspiration to a statue of Germania near 
Riidesheim. Joachim found Hero and Leander in the last movement, 
and W. F. Apthorp found Shakespeare's lago in the first. Clara Schu- 
mann more understandably described it as a "Forest Idyl." In despera- 
tion, one falls back upon the simple statement of Florence May that it 
"belongs absolutely to the domain of pure music." 

[copyrighted] 



'^X^ 



A. 


S. BUNN & CO. 




GROCERS 


273 


THAYER STREET 


S. S. 


PIERCE ASSOCIATE 


FINE WINES & LIQUORS 


GA 1206 


WE DELIVER 



Custom Tailored Garments for Women 

Scotch Tweed Coats, Capes and Suits made 

for women who appreciate careful tailoring 

and lovely materials. 

Choice of many attractive styles, and 
500 of the very finest Scotch Tweeds. 

Prices are reasonable. 

Romanes & Paterson 

581 Boylston Street, Boston In Copley Square 



[17] 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYERS' LiabUity AtMunutee Corporatiom Ud. 
The EMPLOYERS' Fin /juoranee Compaity 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS* Imunmcm Company 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are firetraps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 

Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 




[18] 



ADAGIO FROM THE STRING QUINTET 

By Anton Bruckner 

Born in Ansfeld, Upper Austria, September 4, 1824; died in Vienna, October 11, 1896 



Bruckner composed his Quintet for two violins, two violas, and 'cello in 1879 
(the Adagio was composed in March) . It was first performed from the manuscript 
at a private concert of the Akademische Wagner-Verein, by the Winkler Quartet, 
in Vienna, November 17, 1881. It was published in 1884, and the Hellmesberger 
Quartet performed it in Vienna, January 8, 1885. The dedication is to the Herzog 
Emanuel of Bavaria. 

UNLIKE Beethoven or Brahms, who wrote chamber music before they 
^vere ready to venture upon the larger form of the symphony, 
Bruckner was fifty-four and at work upon his Sixth Symphony when, in 
1879, he tried his hand at a chamber work for the only time in his life. 
Joseph Hellmesberger (the elder) had long been after him for such a 
piece. His greatest admirers find symphonic thinking in the Quintet, 
and it is with no great conviction that they have tried to describe it as a 
successor to Beethoven's last quartets. Rudolf Louis in his book on 




"'Hamlet' is a mark to aim at for the next 
generation." — Marjorie Adams, Globe. 



J^l^ 




ivier 



aurence 

H^ PRESENTS 

amlflH 

Ly WILLIAM SHAKESPEARE 

A Universal-International Release 

Performances Twice Daily at 2:30 - 8:30 
Prices 

iVIatinees: $1.20 - $1.50 - $1.80 (tax incl.) 
Evenings: $1.20 - $1.80 - $2.40 (tax incl.) 

Starts Friday, November 19th at 8:30 sharp 

CARLTON THEATRE 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
74 Mathewson St., Dexter 6502 

Engagement Limited 



[19] 



Bruckner has written about this music: "Its relation to a symphony 
is that of a fresco painter's cartoon to the finished monumental picture." 
It is associated with the probing adagios of the last three symphonies. 
The first theme, with which the movement begins, is marked 
"ausdrucksvoll." The second theme, introduced by the first viola, is 
similar in character, in fact the opening suggests an inversion, and the 
two are closely integrated throughout the development. 

[copyrighted] 



MUSICAL PICTURES: SUITE FOR ORCHESTRA, from "The 
Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan/' Op. 57 

By Nicholas Andreievitch Rimsky-Korsakov 

Born at Tikhvin, in the government of Novgorod, March 18, 1844; died at 

St. Petersburg, June 21, 1908 



"The Fairy Tale of Tsar Saltan, his Son the Renowned and Mighty Paladin, the 
Prince Guidon Saltanovich, and the Beautiful Tsarevna Lebed" (Swan) , an opera 
in four acts, was begun in 1899 and completed January 31, 1900, The opera 
was produced at a private performance in Moscow in 1900. A suite of "musical 
pictures" was performed at St. Petersburg at a concert of the Imperial Russian 
Musical Society shortly afterwards. The first movement and finale of the suite were 
performed by the Boston Symphony Orchestra, April 20, 1923. The "Flight of the 
Bumble Bee," a scherzo from the second act which was not published with the 



Bequests made by will 

to the 

BOSTON .SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

will help to 
perpetuate a great musical tradition. 

Such bequests are exempt from estate taxes. 



[20] 



.suite, Avas performed at these concerts October 24, 1924. The full suite with the 
"Flight of the Bumble Bee" included was performed December 22, 1932, and again 
on February 19, 1936, in commemoration of the centenary of Pushkin's death 
(February 10, 1836) . 

The suite is scored for two flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, three 
clarinets and bass clarinet, two bassoons and double bassoon, four horns, three trum- 
pets, three trombones and bass tuba, timpani, side drum, bass drum, qmbals, tri- 
angle, small bells, xylophone, celesta, harp and strings. Each movement quotes lines 
from Pushkin's poem, and is opened with a trumpet fanfare. 

PUSHKIN turned with increasing interest in the course of his brief 
career to simple folk fairy tales as poetic subjects. "In them," 
according to the new biogi'aphy of the poet by Ernest J. Simmons, 
"he is entirely the creator. The story ["Tsar Saltan"] is borrowed, 
as Shakespeare might borrow the plot of a play, but the finished 
product becomes an original -work of beauty. Pushkin had learned 
to move easily and surely in this world of complete fantasy. The 
artlessness of the folk is never subordinated to the sophisticated rules 
of art. Meaning, or understanding, or logic, is not allowed to obtrude 
upon the natural laws of folk tale narration. The story moves on, as 
it were, by its own volition. And Pushkin's recognition of this in- 
herent artlessness and his complete acceptance of it serve to make these 
folk tales his most perfect creations." 

Rimsky-Korsakov Tvas fascinated by Pushkin's verses in the folk 
tale style. The fantastic prologue to Pushkin's Russian and Lud- 



METROPOLITAN THEATRE PROVIDENCE 

Season 1948—1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 

Five Tuesday Evening Concerts at 8:30 
Remaining concerts: February 1, March 1, March 29 

Remaining Single tickets for the February 1 concert will be 
on sale beginning ^V^ednesday, January 26, at the Avery Piano 
Co., 256 Weybosset St., Providence. 



[«0 



milla" became the subject of his early "Fairy Tales," and in the latter 
part of his career Vladimir Bielsky expanded both the "Tsar Saltan" 
and "The Golden Cock" to the proportions of a libretto for Rimsky- 
Korsakov's purposes in composing an opera on each of the two fairy 
tales. 

Rimsky-Korsakov composed "Tsar Saltan" with enthusiasm. He tells 
us: "In the spring [1899], V. I. Bielsky began to write his splen- 
did libretto, making use of Pushkin as much as was possible, and 
artistically, as well as skillfully, imitating his style. He would hand 
me the scenes, one by one, as they were finished and I set to work on 
the opera. . . . The libretto came to me piecemeal continuously from 
Bielsky." The composer goes on to explain that in his vocal writing 
he carefully adapted to musical form the characteristic reiterated 
dialogue of the two wicked sisters, and the queen Barbarika, the sym- 
metry investing the piece with an intentionally fairy tale character. 
Instrumentally speaking, he made a fairly elaborate use of the system 
of leit-motives in this opera. He also explains how "out of the rather 
longish orchestral preludes to Acts I, II, and IV, I resolved to put 
together a suite under the title 'Little Pictures to the Fairy Tale of 
Tsar Saltan.' " 

The story tells of the handsome and fabulous Tsar Saltan who, 
going about his kingdom incognito, overhears three sisters discussing 
what each would do for the Tsar were she to be his bride. The first 
would bake him fine bread, the second would weave him fine .linen, 
the third and youngest would bear him a beautiful heir to the throne. 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

TIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 
Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



Jones Warehouses, Inc. 

For more than 50 years rendering an exceptionally fine 
service in Furniture Storage, and in Dependable Moving, 
both local and long distance. 

59 CENTRAL ST., PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

"Rhode Island's Largest Household Storage Firm" 



[22] 



The Tsar at once chose the youngest, but made the mistake of allow- 
ing the envious and disappointed sisters to dwell in his palace. The 
Tsaritsa bore him a beautiful son during his absence at the wars, 
but the two sisters, together with the plotting Barbarika, sent 
the king a false message to the effect that the heir was indeed no 
human child, but a monstrous creature in whom nature had no match. 
The Tsar refused to believe this message, and sent word that he was 
returning to see for himself, but again the plotters changed his mes- 
sage to a sentence that the mother and child should be inclosed in a 
barrel and cast upon the sea. For days the two were at the mercy of 
the waves, until the cask was stranded upon a strange shore, the island 
of Buyan. The boy grew daily in beauty and strength, and came to 
be called Prince Gvidon. He saved the life of a swan, which, in grati- 
tude, by its magic powers, endowed the island with three wonders. 
The first w^as a squirrel which whistled folk songs while nibbling nuts 
with golden shells, and extracting kernels of pure emerald. The sec- 
ond was a tempestuous sea which flooded the shore, bearing on its tide 
thirty-three warriors fully armed. The third was a princess as brilliant 
as the sun, w^hose tresses were illumined with moonbeams, and upon 
whose forehead burned a star. The Prince Gvidon, longing for his 
father, the Tsar, and wishing to entice him to the island, was trans- 
formed by the swan's power into a bumble-bee, and made his w^ay to 
the Tsar's domain. ^Vhen his mother's rivals, the baker, the weaver, 
and the Queen tried to distract the Tsar's attention by tales of these 
wonders elsewhere, the transformed prince flew into the face of the 
teller and spoiled their story. When the Queen attempted to describe 
the wondrous princess, Gvidon, as a bumble-bee, flew angrily at her. 

The Tsar at length sailed to the island of Buyan, and greeted his 
fair son and the princess, his bride, who was no other than the swan in 
transformed shape. 

[copyrighted] 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 
246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani/ Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

[-3] 



PROVIDENCE MUSIC TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



ARTHUR EINSTEIN 

PIANIST 

Former Professor of Piano at the Odessa Conservatory (Russia) 

Studios: i6 Conrad Bldg., 349 Morris Avenue 

Phone: GA 1144 




CONCERT PIANIST 

State Accredited 

Graduate and Teacher of Dr. Hoch's 

Conservatory, Frankfort, Germany 

Individual Lessons 

Two Pianoforte Ensemble 

160 IRVING AVE. DE 5667 



FRANK E. STREETER 

PIANO and ENSEMBLE 

Studio, 26 CONRAD BUILDING 3 

Residence, 120 Williams Ave., East Providence, R. I. 14 

ALBERT WATERMAN 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 
170 MEDWAY STREET Plantations 0226 

MONDAY MORNING MUSICAL CLUB STUDIOS 

SEASON 1948-1949 



LYDIA BELL MORRIS, piano, Monday and 
Tuesday afternoons. 

BERTHA WOODWARD, piano, voice. 
Monday, Friday, and Saturday afternoons. 

IRENE MULICK. piano, Monday. Tuesday, 
and Saturday mornings. 



ELSIE LOVELL HAN KINS, voice. Tuesday 
and Wednesday all day. 

BEATRICE WARDEN ROBERTS, piano, 
voice, Wednesday and Saturday all day. 

BEATRICE BALL BATTEY. violin. Thursday 
afternoon. 



AGNES COUTANCHE BURKE, voice, Friday afternoon 

Mason & Hamlin and Steinway Grand Pianos 

Studios available for small recitals and 2-piano practice 

Apply to Studio secretary for information between 11 and i 

63 WASHINGTON ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. MA 2318 



[«4] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^^^\f2^of^Z}'^'^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto No. 12), Air from "Semele" 

( Dorothy Maynor ) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto ( Soloist : William Kapell ) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4 ("Italian") 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kije," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf" ; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite ; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" ; "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 : "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (SanromS.) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5, 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 




(^ 



by richness of tone ^ 
efortless action ^ 
responsiveness. 



ISaTiiiiin 



THE CHOICE OF GREAT CONDUCTOR 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

Serge Koussevitzky — Boston Symphony — 
Baldwin . . . what a trio in the musical cul- 
ture of America! His preference for Baldwin 
is praise indeed: "A great work of musical art 
... a truly orchestral tone, round, full and of 
magnificent resonance and color! . . . For the 
orchestra, as well as tor my own use, the 
Baldwin is PERFECTION." 

We have set aside a Baldwin for you to try. 
Come in and hear it! 



BALDWIN ALSO BUILDS ACROSONIC, HAMILTON AND HOWARD PIANOS 

THE BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY 

in Providence: AXELROD-MUSIC CO., 45 Snow Street 

Eastern Headquarters: — 20 EAST 54TH STREET. NEW YORK CITY 







-/ 



V 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



l)N 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
^.^- HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



■7 



^ 



i.s; 



V 



^'^ .^<:S^ 



^<i^ 



^ — 



-"^ 



^) 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948- I 949 

Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir ResnikofE 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 

Norman Carol 
Carlos Pinfield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 
Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 
Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 
Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 
Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 

Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans ^Verner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 
Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 

Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Filler 

Horns 
Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stemburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



6^ 



192^4X^1949 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burglx, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Third Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, February 1 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Ho^ve 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene - Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis AV. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidellfone Moster 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1.25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 

I fcKlllU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



SOUVENIR ALBUM OF 
KOUSSEVITZKY RECORDINGS 

The anniversary album of double bass 
records by Serge Koussevitzky has been 
prepared by RCA Victor. It is a private 
edition of 1,000 copies and will be dis- 
tributed by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra only. The albums are on sale at 
the Box Ofl&ce at $10 each, the proceeds 
to go to the Serge Koussevitzky Anni- 
versary Fund. They may also be ob- 
tained by mail order without extra cost. 

The recordings were made for RCA 
Victor in the year 1929 when Dr. Kous- 
sevitzky played for the last time the 
instrument by which he first won fame. 
The collection consists of the Andante 
from Koussevitzky's own Double Bass 
Concerto, his Chanson Triste and Valse 
Miniature, a Largo by Eccles and a 
Wiegenlied by Laska. A few copies of the 
Eccles number and the Chanson Triste 
were circulated twenty years ago, but 
the other recordings are to be re- 
leased for the first time. Since the early 
days of electrical recording improve- 
ments in low frequency range through 
re-recording, fidelity by the use of Viny- 
lite, and mechanical performance are 
such that Dr. Koussevitzky has been 
able to give his unqualified approval to 
the new pressings. 

They will make possible a wide ac- 
quaintance with the beauties of an in- 
strument otherwise virtually unknown in 
its solo possibilities, as played by an un- 
exampled virtuoso of the double bass. 
The albums will be sold as souvenirs of 
the Twenty-fifth Anniversary season of 
Serge Koussevitzky as conductor of the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. The pro- 
ceeds will benefit the Koussevitzky 
Twenty-fifth Anniversary Fund of the 
Orchestra. 

At the age of seventeen, Serge Kous- 
sevitzky left the small town in Russia 
where he was born and presented him- 
self at the school of the Moscow Phil- 
harmonic Society. By his own insistence 
(he had no money), he was admitted as 
a student of the double bass, the school 



[2] 



orchestra being deficient in that section. 
Studying under Rambousek, he acquired 
an incredible mastery of the cumbrous 
instrument in an incredibly short period. 
Soon he was able to earn a living by 
playing in orchestras, and after six years 
he was already attracting attention as 
a soloist of the double bass. His instru- 
ment commanded a considerable part of 
the range of the violoncello and he 
played with the ease and subtlety of a 
'cellist, despite the awkwardness of the 
double bass bow which is grasped fist- 
wise. But his instrument gave an espe- 
cial color of its own to these tones and 
could likewise descend into richer depths 
with equal subtlety. While making re- 
cital tours he attracted the attention of 
Arthur Nikisch and played under that 
conductor as soloist with the Leipzig 
Gewandhaus Orchestra to the astonish- 
ment of the audiences which had never 
heard anything of the sort. It was in 
1908 that he first took up the conduc- 
tor's baton, but for years to come he 
did not neglect his bass. 

In the midst of his second season as 
the Boston Symphony conductor (Feb- 
ruary 1926) he received an honorary 
degree from Brown University and re- 
sponded by playing the double bass for 
the first time in this country. He gave 
his first public recital in Symphony Hall 
October 4, 1927, and another in Carnegie 
Hall in the ensuing season. He was de- 
scribed, not as the best living virtuoso 
of the double bass, but as the only one 
within memory who had developed the 
instrument into the highest realm of 
individual musicianship. 

After 1929 Koussevitzky's arduous 
duties as conductor of the Boston Or- 
chestra compelled him regretfully to lay 
aside the bass which to be played to 
his own satisfaction exacted many hours 
of constant practice. Koussevitzky as a 
master artist of the double bass became 
from that moment a legend. At that 
time, however, he made several record- 
ings for the Victor Company, and these 
alone preserve what may now almost 
be called a lost art. 



■i 



C 



lothes 

for 

the 

ladv 

of 

discriminating 

tastes • • . 

created 

by 

famous 

designers 

for 

women 

who 

know 

and 

appreciate 

fine 

things . • . 




Boston 

Providence 
Wellesle/ 



[51 




TyiuAUL 3[i)vsutbu Jinow 



— There is no substitute for the best. . . . For that 
reason we have selected the finest, tke leading names 
in pianos, radios, and organs. ^Vhen you make a pur- 
chase from our carefully chosen stock of musical mer- 
chandise you are protected by our guarantee as well as 
the manufacturer's guarantee. ^Ve feature . . . 



THE 



KIMBALL 



Sitdnwatf, 



SOHMER 
CABLE-NELSON 



PIANO 



EVERETT 



CaftshwiL —Tyiaqnjcwox. 



THE 



TELEVISION 
RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 



{jJuhUi^stJi. 



ORGAN 



% 



AVERY PIANO CO. 

Sole Steinway Representative in Rhode Island, 

Eastern Conn., and Fall River Territory 

256 WEYBOSSET ST. 212 THAMES ST., NEWPORT 



[41 



Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 

Two hundred and Ninetv-ninth Concert in Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



THIRD CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, February i, at 8:30 o'clock 



ELEAZAR DE CARVALHO Conducting 

RiMSKY-KoRSAKOV "The Russian Easter, Overture on 

Themes of the Obichod," Op. 36 

Albeniz Evocation from "Iberia," Suite 

(Orchestrated by E. Fernandez Arbos) 

ViLLA-LoBOS "Fantasia de movimentos mixtos," 

for Viohn and Orchestra 

I. Lent; Anime (Alma convulsa) 
II. Andante (Serenidade) 
III. Allegro non troppo (Contentamente) 

(First performance in the United States) 
INTERMISSION 

Glazounoff Symphony No. 4 in E-fiat, Op. 48 

I. Andante; Allesro moderate 
II. Scherzo: Allegro vivace 
III. Andante; Allegro 

Soloist 
OSCAR BORGERTH 

BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

In conformance with City Regulations ladies are 
respectfully requested to remove their hats 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are given e 
each Monday (WJAR) , on the National Broadcasting Company Net- [ 
work. • 



[5] 



Providence Friends 

of the 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

You have already received a letter from the Trus- 
tees of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, announcing 
the plans for the Anniversary Fund in honor of 
Dr. Serge Koussevitzky. 

The Providence Committee of the Friends of the 
Orchestra hopes that contributions from here will 
be as generous as possible, as a demonstration of our 
warm appreciation of all that Dr. Koussevitzky and 
the Orchestra have meant to the musical life of 
Providence. 

The Committee is planning a brief ceremony to 
honor Dr. Koussevitzky on the occasion of his last 
Providence appearance as regular conductor of this 
Orchestra. The total amount of the Providence con- 
tributions will be made known on that occasion, and 
further plans for the ceremony will be announced 

later. 

Mrs. G. Maurice Congdon 
Chairman^ Providence Committee 

To enroll, simply send a check payable to Boston 
Symphony Orchestra, addressed to Fund Headquar- 
ters at Symphony Hall, Boston 75. ''Big'' gifts and 
small will be gratefully accepted and promptly 
acknowledged. 



[6] 



ELEAZAR DE CARVALHO 

ELEAZAR De Carvalho was born in Iguatu in the State of Ceara, 
Brazil. He spent his childhood on the farm of his parents, who 
were of Dutch extraction on his father's side and pure Indian on his 
mother's. In 1925 he was sent to the town of Fortaleza for his first 
schooling, and there prepared to be an apprentice seaman. He joined 
the National Navy Corps in Rio de Janeiro, where he served until his 
discharge in 1936. 

During these years of preparation and service the young man 
managed to attend two schools of music and to complete a six years* 
course of study in composition under Paulo Silva. To his theoretical 
knowledge he added practical experience by playing in the Naval and 
Marine Bands and in the orchestras of casinos, cabarets and circuses. 
He played the double bass and, joining the orchestra of the Teatro 
Municipal^ the opera house of Rio de Janeiro, played the tuba. He 
meanwhile took a course at the University of Brazil, graduating with 
honors. 

He assisted Eugen Szenkar, the director of the then new Orquestra 
Sinfonica Brasileira, and when in 1941 the opportunity came to him 
to conduct a concert on short notice, the results made him decide to 
devote himself exclusively to conducting. He has since conducted 
many concerts of the Brazilian Orchestra and opened the 1942, 1943, 
and 1944 seasons at the Teatro Municipal. 



For Better Luggage ^«i% 

To suit the taste v^nllllhn 

of the most discriminating— MUIII1L/v 

And Leather Goods ^t^v^ 

From a carefully chosen selection 

VISIT 

!IZ ^. ^ounc[± Co., Jltl. 

52 Washington Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Chez Elise 

ECONOMICAL EXCLUSIVEN ESS 

Suits Coats Dresses 

246 THAYER STREET, PROVIDENCE 



r?] 



Mr. de Carvalho's first opera, "The Discovery of Brazil" ("A Desco- 
berta do Brasil") , was produced at Rio in 1939 and was followed by 
another, "Tiradentes," in 1941. He has written a number of symphonic 
works and chamber pieces in various combinations. Mr. de Carvalho 
has been officially honored by his government as composer, conductor, 
and teacher. In the summer of 1946 he joined Dr. Koussevitzky's con- 
ducting class at the Berkshire Music Center in Tanglewood, and was 
subsequently appointed to the conducting class as assistant to Dr. 
Koussevitzky. 



OSCAR BORGERTH 

OSCAR BoRGERTH w^as born and obtained his musical education in 
Rio de Janeiro. After appearing in Brazilian cities as a concert 
artist, he made a tour of France, Spain, and Portugal before the last 
World War, while living in Paris. In Brazil in recent years he has 
played often as soloist and likewise with the Borgerth Quartet. He is 
a professor of violin at the Escola Nacional de Musica da Universidade 
do Brasil. 




xeiro 



d-lTlu 



SIC 



Established 1910 




45 Snow Street — Providence 3, R. I. 

Publishers — Importers — Dealers 



GA 4833 



Headquarters for the Music Profession 

jBaitoin n^ ^m^ 

CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARTISTS DO 

COME IN AND BROWSE :— Band and orchestral instruments 
and music — Popular music, new and old — Music teachers' and 
Music School supplies — Records, all makes. Classic. Popular and 
Jazz — Repair department. 

■ 38 Years of Continuous Service to the Music Profession - 




METAL CRAFTS SHOP 

The specialty shop for things in metal 
Antique and modern copper, brass and pewter. 

Jewelry and small pieces of silver. 
Excellent metal polish, — repairing, — restoring. 

10 THOMAS STREET/PROVIDENCE, R.L 




[8] 



0\TRTURE, "BRIGHT HOLIDAY"* ("The Russian Easter"), 
ON Themes of the Obichod^ Op. 36 

By Nicholas Andre jevitch Rimsky-Korsakov 

Born at Tikhvin, in the government of Novgorod, March 18, 1844; died at 

St. Petersburg, June 21, 1908 



This Overture had its first performance at a Russian Symphony concert in St. 
Petersburg, in the season 1888-1889, under the composer's direction. The score is 
dedicated "to the memory of Moussorgsky and Borodin/L Rimsky-Korsakov's col- 
leagues who had died in 1881 and 1887, respectively. 

The first performance by the Boston Svmphony Orchestra was on October 23, 1897. 

The orchestration calls for three flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two 
bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani. Glocken- 
spiel, bass drum, triangle, cymbals, tam-tam, harp and strings. 

WHILE laboring on the orchestration of "Prince Igor" in 1888, 
from the posthumous manuscripts of his friend Borodin, 
Rimsky-Korsakov paused to dream of two more congenial, projects. 
When the summer came he carried his sketches to the country estate 
of a friend and brought them to completion. They were "an orches- 

* a popular Russian title for Easter. 




tHi^ On' 



i 



THIRT€€n SOUTH flnG€LL STR€6T 
PROVID€nC€ • RHOD€ ISLflPD 




Sportswear 

Dresses 

Blouses 

Suits 

moderately 
priced 



Telephone MAnning 0506 



<(IAIRDR€SS€RS 

Male Experts 
Hair Styling and Permanent Waves 
286 THAYER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



[9] 



tral composition on the subject of certain episodes from 'Schehera- 
zade,' " and "an Easter overture on themes of the Obichod," a cen- 
tury-old collection of canticles for the Orthodox Church. The two 
works, together with the "Spanish Capriccio," which he had Avritten 
in the previous year, marked the culminating point in a certain phase 
of Rimsky-Korsakov's orchestral style. They developed, in his own 
words, "a considerable degree of virtuosity and bright sonority without 
Wagner's influence, within the limits of the usual make-up of Glinka's 
orchestra." 

Nothing (short of the music itself) can more aptly picture the Chris- 
tian-pagan ritual of old Russia, the "Bright Holiday" as it was called, 
than the vivid paragraphs of the composer himself, from "My Musical 
Life": 

"The rather lengthy slow introduction of the Easter Sunday overture, 
on the theme of 'Let God Arise,' alternating with the ecclesiastical 
theme 'An Angel Waileth,' appeared to me, in its beginning, as it 
were, the ancient Isaiah's prophecy concerning the resurrection of 
Christ. The gloomy colors of the Andante lugubre seemed to depict 
the holy sepulchre that had shone with ineffable light at the moment 
of the resurrection — in the transition to the Allegro of the overture. 
The beginning of the A llegro 'Let them also that hate Him flee before 




OF PARIS 

HAIR STYLIST 

Permanent Wave and Hair Cutting Specialist 
Put Your Head in EMILE'S Hands 

121 MEDWAY STREET 
off Wayland Avenue 
PROVIDENCE. R. I. 
For Appointment Call Dexter 8914 



Smart Clothes . . . 






334 Westminster Street - - - Providence 

[ lo ] . 



Him,' led to the holiday mood of the Greek Orthodox church service 
on Christ's matins; the solemn trumpet voice of the archangel was 
replaced by a tonal reproduction of the joyous, almost dance-like bell- 
tolling, alternating now with the sexton's rapid reading, and now 
with the conventional chant of the priest's reading the glad tidings of 
the evangel. The obichod theme, 'Christ is arisen,' which forms a sort 
of subsidiary part of the overture, appears amid the trumpet-blasts 
and the bell-tolling, constituting also a triumphant coda. In this over- 
ture were thus combined reminiscences of the ancient prophecy, of 
the Gospel narrative and also a general picture of the Easter service, 
with its 'pagan merry-making.' The capering and leaping of the biblical 
King David before the ark, do they not give expression to a mood of 
the same order as the mood of the idol-worshiper's dance? Surely the 
Russian Orthodox obichod is instrumental dance music of the church, 
is it not? And do not the waving beards of the priests and sextons clad 
in w^hite vestments and surplices, and intoning 'Beautiful Easter' in 
the tempo of Allegro vivo, etc., transport the imagination to pagan 
times? And all these Easter loaves and twists and the glowing tapers. 
. . . How far a cry from the philosophic and socialistic teaching of 
Christ! This legendary and heathen side of the holiday, this transi- 
tion from the gloomy and mysterious evening of Passion Saturday to 
the unbridled pagan-religious merrymaking on the morn of Easter 
Sunday is w^hat I was eager to reproduce in my overture. Accordingly 
I requested Count Golyenishcheff-Kootoozoff to write a program in 
verse — which he did for me. But I w^as not satisfied with his poem. 



House of Famous Labels 
Suits Gowns Coats Blouses 

HATTIE BARBOUR HATS 

290 WESTMINSTER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



CURREA'T BOOKS 

by some of the authors who have been at THE BOOK SHOP : 

ANGELL'S LANE, George L. Miner, $5.00 

THIS IS PROVIDENCE, photographs by Beth Murray, $1.00 

REMEMBRANCE ROCK, by Carl Sandburg, $5.00 

THE HALF-PINT JINNI AND OTHER STORIES, by 

Maurice Dolbier, $2.50 
A GHOST TOWN ON THE YELLOWSTONE by EUiot 
Pciul, ?3.50 

^ , ^^ WHILE BENEFIT STREET WAS YOUNG, by Margaret 

Book Shop B. Stillwell. $1.25 

5^si;.;,orSafe^ ^^ne for y^jr library shelves 

In'OVidetiCe Ot^J. (Watch for an additional list of books and authors in 

the next program) 

THE BOOK SHOP 5 GROSVENOR building 

PROVIDENCE 3. R. I. 




[>>] 




THE WORLD'S GREATS 



Hear In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs 
through the ^Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor 
Crestwood"! Hear your treasured recordings brilliantly repro- 
duced! De luxe automatic record changer with ^Silent Sapphire" 
permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short-wave radio. AC. Victrola 
8V151. V.ctrola"-T. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off 




HAVE YOU HEAEl 



r 12 1 




M^ l^iiMfMif^^ 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you a wealth of his 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor— Beethoven. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor; with Frances Yeend; Eunice Alberts; 

David Lloyd; James Pease; and the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus under 
the direction of Robert Shaw. DM-1190, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor ^Red Seal' 
De Luxe Records), $17. 

• Francesco da Rimini, Op. 32— Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. Album DM-1179, $4.75. 

• Symphony No. 5, in B-Flot — Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra^ 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-1215, $4.75. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclusive of local taxes. 
("DM" and "DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



ARTISTS ARE 



&Hy 



VlCOKfimk 



.^b 



HE NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERtJOONS OVER NBC 



'3 



and wrote in prose my own program, which same is appended to the 
published score. Of course, in that program I did not explain my 
views and my conception of the 'Bright Holiday,' leaving it to tones 
to speak for me. Evidently these tones do, within certain limits, speak 
of my feelings and thoughts, for my overture raises doubts in the 
minds of some hearers, despite the considerable clarity of the music. 
In any event, in order to appreciate my overture, even ever so slightly, 
it is necessary that the hearer should have attended Easter morning 
service at least once, and, at that, not in a domestic chapel, but in a 
cathedral thronged with people from every walk of life, with several 
priests conducting the cathedral service — something that many intel- 
lectual Russian hearers, let alone hearers of other confessions, quite 
lack nowadays. As for myself, I had gained my impressions in my 
childhood passed near the Tikhvin monastery itself." 

[copyrighted] 





^^m/" 



IN CORPORA-TED 

ESTABLISHED 1840 



MAKERS OF EMAGRIN TABLETS FOR THE RELIEF OF PAIN, 
ESPECIALLY TO REDUCE DISCOMFORT OR FEVER RESULTING 
FROM SIMPLE HEADACHES, NEURALGIAS AND COMMON COLDS 

459 BOYLSTON STREET As BEACON STREET 4ir WESTMINSTER STREET 

BOSTON BOSTON PROVIDENCE 



A. W. FAIRCHILD & CO. INC. 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS & GIFTS 

ARCADE BUILDING 
PROVIDENCE 



[14] 



SUITE FROM "IBERIA" 
By IzAAc Albeniz 

Born at Camprodon in Catalonia, May 29, i860; died at Cambo-des-Bains in 

the Pyrenees, May 18, 1909 

Arranged for orchestra by Enrique Fernandez Arbos 

(Born at Madrid, December 25, 1863; died at San Sebastian, June 3, 1939) 



Albeniz composed four sets of three pieces each for piano solo under the title 
"Iberia." He composed them between the years 1906 and 1909. The first contained 
"Evocacion, "El Puerto," "Fete-Dieu a Seville"; the second, "Triana" "Abneria" 
"Rondena"; the third, "El Alhaicin" "El Polo" "Lavapies"; the fourth, "Malaga" 
"Jerez," Eritdna." E. Fernandez Arbos* made an orchestration of the first four 
of these, and also "El Albaicifi." They were performed for the first time under 
his direction by the Orquesta Sinfonica in Madrid, of which he was the conductor 
for a number of years. 

"La Fete-Dieu a Seville" and "Triana" were performed for the first time in Bgston 
when Mr. Arbos conducted the Boston Symphony Orchestra as guest on January 
18-19, 1929. 

Mr. Arbos requires the following instruments for these pieces: three flutes and 
piccolo, two oboes and English horn, two clarinets, E-fiat clarinet and bass clarinet, 
two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, four trumpets, three trombones and 
tuba, timpani, full percussion, two harps, and strings. 



* Enrique Fernandez Arbos studied violin at the Conservatory in Madrid and later in 
Brussels under Vieuxtemps and in Berlin under Joachim. For years he appeared in many 
parts of the world as a violin virtuoso, also serving as concert master for the Berlin Phil- 
harmonic Orchestra and for the Boston SjTnphony Orchestra in the season 1903—04. In that 
season he organized a quartet with members of this orchestra. Before his death he conducted 
as s:uest in a number of cities here and abroad. Conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra 
January 18-19, 1929, he presented music by Wagner, Halffter, Ravel, Albeniz, Turina and 
de Falla. 




100 
PROOF 



TO KENTUCKY HOSPITALITY 

ONE key turns In the door of a gracious 
Kentucky home. The other key unlocks to 
your enjoyment the favorite Bonded Bour- 
■ bon of Kentuckians... robust in flavor, with 
distinctive bouquet. Enjoy the genuine sour 
mash Bourbon Kentuckians prefer. Ask for 
01 FITZGERALD today. 

OLD FASHIONED.. -^4/.^^^^.^ 

OLD FITZGERALD 



[i5l 



ALBENiz composed his Suite "Iberia" in the last three years of his life, 
^ when he had made his home in Paris and was enjoying, after 
much wandering and considerable poverty, a growing fame in France. 
The following description of the original piano pieces is taken from the 
book "Music in Spain" by Gilbert Chase (1941): 

"EVOCACION" 

"Works of formidable technical difficulty, taxing the resources of 
the best-equipped virtuosi, those twelve 'impressions' — so they are 
called in the subtitle — constitute an imaginative synthesis of Spain 
(though in truth most of the pieces have Andalusia for their locale) 
as seen through the nostalgic evocations of the composer in his Parisian 
exile. 

"Each of these pieces utilizes Spanish rhythms in a freely artistic and 
idealized manner, the rhythms of the dance alternating with the vocal 
refrain or copla. 'Evocacion,' the opening number of 'Iberia,' is a 
fandanguillo (literally, 'little fandango') , with an intensely lyrical 
copla that appears first in the bass and later returns in the upper 
register marked tres douce et lointain (very soft and distant) . This 
melody, with its characteristic cadence on the dominant and its 
thoroughly guitaristic accompaniment, is typical of Albeniz in his 
most idyllic mood. Technically this is the least difficult of all the 
pieces in 'Iberia.' " 

[copyrighted] 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

CONCERT BY CONSERVATORY ORCHESTRA 

Malcolm H. Holmes, Conductor 

and 

CONSERVATORY CHORUS 

LoRNA Cooke deVaron, Conductor 

BRUCKNER MASS IN E minor 
Jordan Hall, Wednesday and Thursday evenings^ February 16 and 17 

at 8:15 p.m. 
Tickets for reserved floor seats free at Jordan Hall Box Office. 



^'^Mu t hui , 




HOLLIDGE 

■ ■ Boston and Wellesley 



Unmistakably identified with Quality . . • 

your store, our store, C. Crawford Hollidge. Here you 
find first fashions first . . . individualized coats, 
suits, dresses, and the accessories with 
which to complement them. 

May we have the pleasure of showing 
our newest collections to YOU? 



[16] 



FANTASIA PER MOVIMENTOS MIXTOS, for Violix 

AND Orchestra 

By Heitor Villa-Lobos 
Born in Rio de Janeiro, March 5, 1881 



Composed in Rio de Janeiro in 1921, this Fantasia had its first performance bv 
Oscar Borgerth at the Colon Theatre in Buenos Aires, November 1, 1940, the 
composer conducting. 

The score calls for two flutes and piccolo, tA\"o oboes and English horn, two 
clarinets, two bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, two trumpets, three trom- 
bones and tuba, timpani, tam-tam, harp, cymbals, and strings. 

ViLLA-LoBOS has named the three movements of this piece, ^vith 
French translations, as Alma Convulsa (Tourment) , Serenidade 
(Serenite) , Contentamente {Contentement) . The score is dedicated 
to Paulina d'Ambrosio, a violin teacher of the University of Brazil Tvho 
once taught Oscar Borgerth. . 

Visiting this country in the season of 1944-45 Villa-Lobos conducted 
his music at the Boston Symphony concerts of February 25-24: two 
movements from ''Bachianas Brasileiras" No. 7, Choros No. 12, and 
Rudetfoema. 

"Villa-Lobos," wTites Mr. Slonimsky, "is a 'programmatic' composer. 
Every piece of music he wTites has a story, and every title he places 



A. 


S. BUNN& CO. 




GROCERS 


273 


THAYER STREET 


S. S. 


PIERCE ASSOCIATE 


FINE WINES & LIQUORS | 


GA 1206 


WE DELIVER 



Custom Tailored Garments for Women 

Scotch Tweed Coats, Capes and Suits made 

for women who appreciate careful tailoring 

and lovely materials. 

Choice of many attractive styles, and 
500 of the very finest Scotch Tweeds. 

Prices are reasonable. 

Romanes & Paterson 

581 Boylston Street, Boston In Copley Square 



[•71 



over a finished work is a picture. Brazilian legendary epos particularly 
fascinates him. His music is more than individualistic; it is almost 
anarchistic in its disregard for the performer's limitations. When Villa- 
Lobos needs a certain sonority, he expects the player to produce it. 
He might have replied to the dismayed performer, as Schonberg did, 
when a violinist remarked that his Violin Concerto requires six fingers 
on the left hand: 'I can wait.' Yet Villa-Lobos' music is not unplay- 
able; it is merely difficult in an untraditional way. To the technical 
complexity is added the complexity of rhythm, and aural perception. 
Villa-Lobos can write in an exceedingly clear manner, as witness his 
numerous, and successful, choruses and piano pieces for children; but 
when he needs utmost expressive power, he resorts to the harshest type 
of dissonance, and employs instrumental effects that seem to do violence 
to the instruments, at least in the view of conventional performers." 
And his colleague Burle Marx has described him as "that rare 
phenomenon, a composer who works at his trade. With him it is not a 
question of time, mood, feeling, or inspiration, but rather of necessity. 
His music is a continuous, spontaneous, abundant pouring forth. He 
is perhaps the only modern composer who creates with complete 
abandon and unselfconsciousness. Not at all perturbed by rigid innova- 
tions, or by problems of style and form, he creates like a god — with- 
out question and with sure confidence. Each work has a form, a color, 
a style and vigor of its own. It is possible perhaps that such an amalga- 
mation of contending forces — indigenous, primitive, Portuguese, 
European and African — could spring only from a country like Brazil 
with its great unexplored forests, its mountains, its rivers and vast skies. 
Whatever the sources, the music is Villa-Lobos." 

[copyrighted] 



SYMPHONY NO. 4 IN E-FLAT, Op. 48 
By Alexander Constantinovitch Glazounov 

Born in St. Petersburg, August 10, 1865; died in Paris, March 21, 1936 



Glazounov composed his Fourth Symphony in 1893. It was first performed at 
St. Petersburg in 1894 under the direction of the composer. The first performance 
at the concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra was on October 23, 1903. The 
Symphony was repeated January 1, 1904, and March 2, 1923. 

The orchestration calls for three flutes and piccolo, two oboes and English horn, 
three clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones and tuba, 
timpani, and strings. The score is dedicated to Anton Rubinstein. 

»~pHE composer has dispensed with a slow movement in this sym- 
-*• phony, using in its stead an Andante introduction to his third 
movement. 

When Glazounov died in Paris in 1936, the world lost one of the last 

[18] 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYERS* Liability Auurane* Corponuiom Ltd. 
Th« EMPLOYEES' Fire Imtunuux Company 
AMERICAN EMPIjOYERS' liuuranem Compamy 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over ^0,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back £ind watch the flames when 
something can be done? ^ 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from' 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fi ret raps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 



7C/i 





Your local Employers' Group insursmce agent. 



THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



I 



[.^9] 



SYMPHONY HALL, BOSTON 

SUNDAY, MARCH 27 

IN TWO PARTS, BEGINNING AT 3 AND 8 

PENSION FUND 

CONCERT BY THE 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



BACH'S 

MASS IN B MINOR 



Assisted by the 

HARVARD GLEE CLUB 

AND 

RADCLIFFE CHORAL SOCIETY 

(G. WALLACE WOODWORTH, Conductor) 

SOLOISTS TO BE ANNOUNCED ' 



Tickets at box office: $2, $2.50, $3, $3.50, $4, $4.80 (Tax included) 



[20] 



remaining links with the early development of the Russian nationalist 
school. Glazounov was inacti\e as composer in his last years. He had 
left Russia in 1928, made Paris his home, and visited this country in 
1929, conducting the Boston Symphony Orchestra as guest, January 
17, 1930.* Long before he left Russia his creative career had ceased. 
The last kno"\vn work (excepting a small piece for 'cello) was his 
incidental music to The King of the Jews in 1914. In Russia's lean 
days after the first World AV^ar, the composer ^vas reduced by ill health; 
H. G. A Veils met him in Petrograd in the autumn of 1920 and re- 
ported (in Russia in the Shadows) , "He used to be a very florid 
man, but now he is pallid and very much fallen away, so that his 
clothes hang loosely on him." Glazounov had become director of the 
St. Petersburg Conservatory in 1905 and from that time had devoted 
most of his energies to teaching. 

Above any other composer, Glazounov stood, a living span betiveen 
two centuries. The young and aspiring musicians at the Leningi'ad 
Conservatory long looked up to him as the surviving spokesman 



* It was January 17, 1930 ; the program — Sixth Symphony, the Violin Concerto, and 
the symphonic poem "Stenka Razin." Glazounov also conducted the Detroit Symphony Or- 
chestra in Detroit (November 21, 1929) and at the Metropolitan Opera House in New York 
(December 3, 1929). 



METROPOLITAN THEATRE PROVIDENCE 

Season 1948—1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 

Five Tuesday Evening Concerts at 8:50 
Remaining concerts: March 1, March 29 



Remaining Single tickets for the March 1 concert will be 
on sale beginning AVednesday, February 23, at the Avery Piano 
Co., 256 Weybosset St., Providence. 



[21] 



of ci tradition which, deride it as they migiit, has something invaluable 
to those who have the discrimination to adapt old equipment to new 
styles. Glazounov's mastery of form, his uncanny skill in counterpoint 
and orchestration, his subtlety in thematic usage — these qualities have 
made him precious to a new order, trying to find its stride. 

His brilliant ease in composition smoothed his pathway through 
his long career. Musically speaking, Glazounov above all others was 
born with a silver spoon. His life had known no serious obstacles; 
he never had to undergo the sting of neglect, or to wait a decade 
or so for a sluggish world to attune itself to his musical message. His 
mother, a pianist, was also a musician of intelligence, and her just 
concern was to find teachers who could instill that invaluable quality 
in the young "Sascha." Her friend Mili Balakirev took the boy under 
his wing, and brought his attempts at composition to the attention of 
Rimsky-Korsakov. It was a propitious moment. The Russian national- 
ist group, having laboriously cemented their foundations, were on the 
lookout for young blood to carry on their work. Here indeed was a 
lad of promise, a "little Glinka." 

He advanced rapidly during the period of a year and a half in 
which he studied with Rimsky-Korsakov, and in 1881 was able to show 
his teacher a completed first symphony, which was duly performed by 
Balakirev, at a Free School concert in St. Petersburg. Rimsky-Korsakov 
describes the astonishment of the audience when a youth, in the "gym- 
nasium" uniform the students wore, stepped shyly out to acknowledge 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLETS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



Jones Warehouses, Inc. 

For more than 50 years rendering an exceptionally fine 
service in Furniture Storage, and in Dependable Moving, 
both local and long distance. 

59 CENTRAL ST., PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

"Rhode Island's Largest Household Storage Firm'* 



[22 1 



their applause. A further intense e apprenticeship, including member- 
ship in the orchestra of the University and first-hand experience -^vith 
^\'Ood wind and brass instruments, and Glazounov Tvas composing pro- 
fusely. Such influential musicians as Anton Rubinstein smiled upon 
his works, and they did not lack performance. Neither did they lack 
a publisher, for Belaiev was conveniently at hand. Glazounov tra\ eled 
westward in 1884, met Liszt at AV^eimar, and thanks to his helpful 
ministrations the first symphony (which was several times revised) was 
heard there. 

In 1886 he completed his Second Symphony, dedicated to and duly 
brought out by Liszt. The composer conducted this Symphony, to- 
gether with the symphonic poem, "Stenka Razin/' at the Paris Exposi- 
tion, 1889, then receiving an expression of warm appreciation from 
Tchaikovsky. In such ^vays his music attained a considerable reputa- 
tion through Europe. Tone poems, symphonies, chamber music, ballet 
music, songs, and piano pieces came with profusion from his pen. The 
Third Symphony is dated 1890; the Fourth, 1894; the Fifth, 1896; the 
Sixth, 1897; the Seventh was published in 1902. The Eighth, which 
was the last he wrote, is dated 1906. 

Succeeding Rimsky-Korsakov as director of the St. Petersburg Con- 
servatory in 1909, he held the office till 1912, and was appointed direc- 
tor for a second time in 1922. He shortly relinquished this post to 
Maximilian Steinberg. 

[copyrighted] 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGLXG 

Symphony Chambers 
246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of sinerine: by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
raise en scene bj- Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6191 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 
25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

[=3] 



PROVIDENCE MUSIC TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



ARTHUR EINSTEIN 

PIANIST 

Former Professor of Piano at the Odessa Conservatory (Russia) 

Studios: i6 Conrad Bldg., 349 Morris Avenue 

Phone: GA 1144 




CONCERT PIANIST 

State Accredited 

Graduate and Teacher of Dr. Hoch's 

Conservatory, Frankfort, Germany 

Individual Lessons 

Two Pianoforte Ensemble 

i6o IRVING AVE. DE 5667 



FRANK E. STREETER 

PIANO and ENSEMBLE 

Studio, 26 CONRAD BUILDING 3 

Residence, 120 Williams Ave., East Providence, R. I. 14 



ALBERT WATERMAN 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 
170 MED WAY STREET Plantations 0226 



MONDAY MORNING MUSICAL CLUB STUDIOS 

SEASON 1948-1949 



LYDIA BELL MORRIS, piano, Monday and 
Tuesday afternoons. 

BERTHA WOODWARD, piano, voice, 
Monday, Friday, and Saturday afternoons. 

IRENE MULICK, piano, Monday. Tuesday, 
and Saturday nnornings. 



ELSIE LOVELL HANKINS, voice. Tuesday 
and Wednesday all day. 

BEATRICE WARDEN ROBERTS, piano, 
voice, Wednesday and Saturday all day. 

BEATRICE BALL BATTEY, violin. Thursday 
afternoon. 



AGNES COUTANCHE BURKE, voice, Friday afternoon 

Mason & Hamlin and Steinway Grand Pianos 

Studios available for small recitals and 2-piano practice 

Apply to Studio secretary for information between 11 and i 

63 WASHINGTON ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



MA 2318 



[«4l 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra '^''*^^„!^,?'^f.fl"^''^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3. 4, 5. 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Xos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis ; 

Overture to "Egmont" 

Berlioz Symphony. •Harold In Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "naniiiation of Fnust," Overture. "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 8. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico." "Appalachian Spring." "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pellcas et Melisande." Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The T>ast Spring" 

Handel Larghetto ; Air from "Semele" (Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 8 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto (Soloist: William Kapell) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) : E-flat (184) : C major 

(388) : Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges." Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
tne Wolf" ; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite ; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Tsle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe." Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pavane. Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" : Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 : "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5; "Pohjola's Daughter"; 

"Tapiola" : "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever." "Semper Fidelia" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring." "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio ( Sanrom^ ) : Song of the Volga Bargemen 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4. 5. 6: Waltz (from String 

Serenade): Overture. "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 



by richness of tone, 
efortless action ^ 
responsiveness. 




ISaliwin 



THE CHOrCE OF GREAT CONDUCTOR 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

Serge Koussevitzky — Boston Symphony — 
Baldwin . . . what a trio in the musical cul- 
ture of America! His preference for Baldwin 
is praise indeed: "A great work of musical art 
... a truly orchestral tone, round, full and of 
magnificent resonance and color! . . . For the 
orchestra, as well as tor my own use, the 
Baldwin is PERFECTION." 

We have set aside a Baldwin for you to try. 
Come in and hear it! 



BALDWIN ALSO BUILDS ACROSONIC, HAMILTON AND HOWARD PIANOS 

THE BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY 
In Providence: AXELROD-MUSiC CO., 45 Snow Street 

Eastern Headquarters: — 20 EAST 54TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY 





BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIG 





SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948 -1949 

Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 
PERSONNEL 
ViouNS Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 



Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 
Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 
Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 
Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph I.eibovici 
Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitcb 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 

Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 

Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 

Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



Jean Cauhap^ 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 
Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 



Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Filler 

Horns 
Willem Valkeniei 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel La fosse 
Harry Herforth 
Ren^ Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansott^ 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 

Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



.cMTY-F/c-. 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fourth Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, March 1 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



[1 J 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 

rClllrlU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



THE KOUSSEVITZKY BASS 
RECORDS 

Among the many reviews of the new 
album of double bass recordings by 
Serge Koussevitzky, the following are 
quoted: 

Claudia Gassidy (in the Chicago 
Tribune) : 

"Collectors in search of Serge Kous- 
sevitzky's double bass recordings are 
being rescued by a series of . circum- 
stances. Perhaps you remember that 
when Boston asked its renowned con- 
ductor what he wanted in token of ad- 
miration and affection in the 25th and 
farewell season, he said he wanted "a 
big gift" for his orchestra. That gift 
was a backlog of financial security, and 
the fast growing Serge Koussevitzky 
Anniversary fund is the result. To 
augment it, a limited edition of 1,000 
albums of Koussevitzky recordings has 
.been made available by the Boston or- 
chestra in cooperation with RCA Victor. 
Each is autographed, holds the portrait 
of the player with his instrument now 
hanging in Koussevitzky's Tanglewood 
home, and features three 12-inch, ruby 
vinylite records of the slow movement 
from Koussevitzky's double bass con- 
certo, his Chanson Triste and Valse 
Miniature, and his arrangement of a 
largo by Eccles, plus a lullaby by Laska. 
The recordings were made in 1929, and 
you have to hear what they can do with 
the double bass to believe it. Pierre 
Luboshutz is the accompanist. The price 
is $10, including mailing costs. Address 
the Boston Symphony Orchestra, Sym- 
phony Hall, Boston 15." 

Jay C. Rosenfeld (in the Berkshire 

Eagle) : 

"Immediately discernible are the at- 
tributes which make orchestral music 
under his direction so absorbing; a 
magnificent conception of line, a con- 
tinuously glowing tone and the peerless 
faculty of maintaining and re-instilling 
vigorous urgency in the music. Except 
for a propensity to make his shifts and 



[2] 



slides very noticeable, the mechanics 
of the playing are formidable. His in- 
tonation has the character associated 
with Casals and Heifetz, the tone has 
a vivid warmth and the bowing the un- 
canny amplitude of those masters who 
know the secret of preserving intensity 
without expending all their resources. 
■ It used to be the custom at times to 
use a smaller instrument for solo play- 
ing than the dinosaurian monster or- 
dinarily used today in orchestral play- 
ing. There is no reason to warrant any 
such assumption in this case. The 
smaller body, however, permitted the 
achievement of a 'cello-like tone while 
the employment of a longer neck re- 
tained the problems peculiar to the 
unwieldy viol. This album exhibits an- 
other and less known fact of Kousse- 
vitzky's art and proves, if proof were 
necessary, that the talents which have 
made him superlative as a conductor 
served him equally well as a performer. 



BACH'S MASS 

The performance of Bach's Mass in 
B minor by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra on March 27 will mark the last 
of many Pension Fund concerts in which 
the Orchestra has combined with the 
choruses of Harvard and Radcliffe under 
Dr. Koussevitzky's direction. The asso- 
ciation between conductor and choruses 
extends back to November, 1925, when 
he had been in this country only a year. 
It was in 1931, the fiftieth anniversary 
of the Orchestra, that Dr. Koussevitzky 
revived, in a Bach Festival, this great 
choral work of Bach, which had not 
been heard in Boston for many years. 

The chorus is being prepared by its 
conductor, G. Wallace Woodworth. A 
quartet of soloists will be announced 
shortly. On account of the length of 
the Mass, which is uncut, it will be given 
in two parts, the first at three in the 
afternoon and the second at eight in the 
evening. 



C 



WMM. 





lothes 

for 

the 

lady 

of 

discriminating 

tastes . . . 

created 

by 

famous 

designers 

for 

women 

who 

know 

and 

appreciate 

fine 

things • . • 




Boston 

Providence 

Wellesley 



[Si 




Tybi&iiL ^vsAA, Jinow 



— There is no substitute for the best. . . . For that 
reason we have selected the finest, the leading names 
in pianos, radios, and organs. When you make a pur- 
chase from our carefully chosen stock of musical mer- 
chandise you are protected by our guarantee as well as 
the manufacturer's guarantee. We feature . . . 



THE 

KIMBALL 



Stidrnvat^ 



SOHMER 
CABLE-NELSON 



PIANO 
EVEREn 



CapsdiahL--7ybDiqjnavox^ 



TELEVISION 
RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 



THE 



(x)ju/dii^£/L 



ORGAN 



% 



AVERY PIANO CO. 

Sole Steinway Representative in Rhode Island, 

Eastern Conn., and Fall River Territory 

256 WEYBOSSET ST. 212 THAMES ST., NEWPORT 



[4] 



W'U ^erge Eou^siebit^fej) ^nnibersiarp Jf unti 



of the 



Boston Symphony Orchestra, Inc. 



MARCH 1, 1949 



Following the Intermission there will be a brief ceremony 

in honor of 

(Arranged by the Providence Friends of the Boston Symphony Orchestra) 



Address The Honorable John Nicholas Brown 

Assistant Secretary of the Navy for Air 

Presentation of Citation from Brown University Henry Merritt Wriston 

President, Brown University 



RHODE ISLAND CONTRIBUTORS TO 

THE SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY ANNIVERSARY FUND 

OF THE BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, INC. 



Mrs. George Abrich 

Mr. and Mrs. Walter Adler 

Mr. John G. Aldrich 

Mr. Putnam C. Aldrich 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur M. Allen 

Mr. and Mrs. John A. Anderson 

Mr. Philip T. Andrews 

Mr. Vincent Andrews 

Mrs. R. Edwards Annin, Jr. 

Mrs. George C. Arnold 

Mr. Fred B. Avakian 

M. E. B. 

Mr. Donald S. Babcock 

Miss Margaret L. Babcock 

Mr. George A. Baker, Jr. 

Mrs. Harvey A. Baker 

Dr. and Mrs. Reuben C. Bates 

Beethoven Club of Providence 

Dr. and Mrs. 

Emanuel W. Benjamin 

Mrs. Emilie Berger 
Blackstone Valley Music 

Teachers' Society 
Misses Ada and Janet Blinkhorn 
Miss Muriel F. Bliss 
Miss Mildred A. Blumenthal 
Dr. and Mrs. Ralph W. Braids 
Mr. and Mrs. Charles Brier 
Mr. and Mrs. Curtis B. Brooks 

Mr. and Mrs. 

John Nicholas Brown 

Mrs. Robert P. Brown 

Mrs. Charles W. Bubier, Sr. 

Miss R. Ethel Bugbee 

Dr. and Mrs. Alex M. Burgess 

Mrs. Duncan Buttrick 

Mrs. Samuel Hyde Cabot 

Mr. John Hutchins Cady 

Miss Maria L. Camardo 

Mrs. Wallace Campbell 

Miss Edith M. L. Carlborg 

Miss Sigfrid H. Carlson 

Miss Mary E. Carpenter 

Mrs. Gilbert Congdon Carpenter 

Miss Anne Carter 

Dr. and Mrs. Francis Chafee 

Chaminade Club 

Mme. Avis Bliven Charbonnel 

Chopin Club of Providence 

Mr. and Mrs. Roger T. Clapp 



Miss Sydney Clarke 

Mrs. Sidney Clifford 

Mr. James C. Collins 

Mrs. G. Maurice Congdon 

Mr. and Mrs. Wallace F. Creasy 

Mrs. Gammell Cross 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Harry Parsons Cross 
Miss Mary C. Crowell 
Mrs. Joseph H. Cull 
Mrs. Charles C. Cushman 

Miss Mary Daboll 
Miss Emma H. Dahlgren 
Mrs. Murray S. Danforth 
Mr. W. W. Dempster 
Mrs. Paul C. DeWolf 
Miss Myrtle T. Dexter 
Miss Edith A. Dresser 
Mrs. Robert B. Dresser 
Mr. George Dubois 
Mrs. George Dubois 
Miss Grace Isabel Dubois 
Mr. Charles E. Duquette 
Miss Flora E. Dutton 
Miss Margaretta L. Dwight 

Mrs. Charles R. Easton 
Mrs. Edward R. Eberle 
Miss Edith W. Edwards 
Mr. and Mrs. Gurney Edwards 
Mr. and Mrs. 

William H. Edwards 
Mr. and Mrs. Lowell Emerson 
Mrs. Robert S. Emerson 
Mrs. Edward A. Emery 
Miss Gertrude J. Emery 
Mr. Irving N. Espo 
Mr. and Mrs. Edward S. Esty 
Miss Anna L. Evans 
Mrs. Walter G. Everett 

W. P. H. F. 

Mr. Howard L. Fales 

Mrs. Edwin A. Farnell 

Mr. Edward M. Fay 

Mr. and Mrs. Arthur H. Feiner 

Miss Louise M. Fish 

Misses Grace and Joan Fletcher 

Mrs. Clarke F. Freeman 

Mr. and Mrs. Hovey T. Freeman 

Miss Margaret A. Fuller 



Miss Frances M. Gardner 

Mr. and Mrs. Edward J. Gately 

Mrs. Leo Gershman 

Mrs. R. H. I. Goddard, Jr. 

Mr. and Mrs. Harry Hale Goss 

Mr. Keith H. Goudey 

Mrs. Harry L. Grant 

Miss Charlotte M. Greene 

Miss Iris Greene 

Miss Bertha C. Greenough 

Miss Helen M. Greenough 

Mrs. William Bates Greenough 

Mr. and Mrs. George E. Gregory 

Miss Louise Harris 
Mrs. Henry C. Hart 
Mrs. Joseph C. Hartwell 
Mrs. Jonathan H. Harwood 
Miss Dorothy M. Hazard 
Mr. and Mrs. 

Clifford D. Heathcote 
Miss Bessie Hepstonstall 
Mrs. Ross V. Hersey 
Mrs. Daniel C. Hey, Jr. 
Mr. Paul Heymann 
Mr. Robert L. Hilliard 
Mrs. Frank L. Hinckley 
Mrs. Paul H. Hodge 
Mrs. Bernard J. Hogue 
Mrs. C. H. Horner 
Miss Priscilla P. Horr 
Mrs. E. H. Howard 
Mrs. Karl Humphrey 
Miss Alice Arnold Hunt 
Mr. Carlos F. Hunt 
Miss Charlotte A. Hunt 

Mrs. Arthur Ingraham 
Mr. and Mrs. 

Earle Nye Ingraham 

Mrs. F. Ellis Jackson 

Mr. and Mrs. Robert E. Jacobson 

Mrs. Edward P. Jastram 

Mr. Philip S. Jastram 

Mr. Maxim Karolik 
Mr. Frederick L. Kateon 

Mr. and Mrs. 

A. Livingston Kelley 
Mr. and Mrs. Howard A. Kelley 
Mrs. Frederick B. Kent 
Mrs. Eugene A. Kingman 
Miss Ellen Kirk 
Mr. David P. Kopeck 



I 



Ml. Paul R. Ladd 

Miss E. Gertrude Law son 

Miss Priscilla H. Leonard 

Mrs. Austin T. Levy 

^Villoughby Little Foundation 

Dr. Henry D. Lloyd 

Mr. Ronald S. Longley 

Miss Helen D. Loring 

Mr. and Mrs. 

George V. Loveridge 

Mrs. Ralph G. Lumb 



Mr. Hugh F. MacColl 

MacDowell Club 

Miss Janet S. MacLeod 

Mrs. Kenneth B. MacLeod 

Mrs. Norman D. MacLeod 

Commodore and Mrs. 
Gary Magruder 

Mr. Allen Markoff 

Mrs. Samuel F. Markoff 

Mr. and Mrs. Leo A. Marks 

Mrs. Albert E. Marshall 

Miss Margaret Marshall 

Miss Christina K. Martin 

Mr. C. E. Mason, Jr. 

Mr. Stanley H. Mason 

Mr. Hazen Y. Mathewson 

Mrs. Frank W. Matteson 

Miss Elaine A. Mauger 

Mrs. Irving J. McCoid 

Mr. J. Thomas McQuaid 

Mr. Paul A. Merriam 

Mrs. Charles H. Merriman 

Mrs. E. Bruce Merriman 

Mr. and Mrs. G. Pierce Metcalf 

Mrs. Houghton P. Metcalf 

Mrs. Jesse H. Metcalf 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan J. Miller 

Mr. Alex Miller 

Miss Eva A. Mooar 

Mrs. David P. Moulton 

Mr. and Mrs. E. C. Mowry 

Miss Irene L. Mulick 

Miss A. Andrea Munster 



Mrs. J. K. H. Nightingale 
Mrs. J. K. H. Nightingale, Jr. 

Miss Marian O'Brien 

Miss Esther Pauline Parsons 

Dr. and Mrs. Harold J. Pearce 

Mrs. Frederick S. Peck 

Mr. and Mrs. Frank W. Peters 

Mrs. Clarence H. Philbrick 

Mr. George F. Phillips 

Mr. and Mrs. Albert R. Plant 

Mrs. Emery M. Porter 

Mrs. T. I. Hare Powel 

Miss Rose Presel 

Mrs Albert E. Rand 

Mr. and Mrs. Alan M. Ravenal 

Miss Jeanne E. Raymond 

Mrs. Frederic B. Read 

Mrs. Ludwig Regensteiner 

Miss Dorothy L. Rice 

Mr. Martin L. Riesman 

Mr. and Mrs. Aaron H. Roitman 

Mrs. Carl Schraysshuen 
Mr. Arthur A. Schwarz 
Mr. Harry A. Schwartz 
Mr. and Mrs. Lester F. Shaal 
Dr. and Mrs. Ezra A. Sharp 
Miss Ellen D. Sharpe 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Henrys Dexter Sharpe 
Mr. Edwin F. Sherman 
Mr. Ben Sinel 
Miss Alice E, Smith 
Miss Hope Smith 
Mr. and Mrs. Kirk Smith 
Mrs. W. M. Stobbs 
Mrs. Arthur P. Sumner 
Mrs. "W'alter L Sundlun 
Miss Helen T. Sutherland 
Miss Jean Swift 
Miss Helen Sylvester 



Miss Eliza F. W. Taft 
Mr. Paul Tamarkin 
Miss Ruth F. Thomson 
Miss Margaret E. Todd 
Mrs. R. H. Trott 
Mr. Robert C. Turnbull 

Miss Anne T. \'ernon 

Miss Hazel M. Walker 
Mrs. Helen W. Walker 
Mr. and Mrs. Ashbel T. Wall 
Mrs. Frederic A. Wallace 
Miss M. Beatrice Ward 
Mrs. George B. Waterhouse 
Mr. Phillips R. Weatherbee 
In Memorv of 

Mrs. George H. \Vebb 
Dr. and Mrs. Joseph B. Webber 
Mrs. Arthur P. Weeden 
Miss Elisabeth G. "Weeks 
Mr. and Mrs. Mark \Veisberg 
Mr. and Mrs. John H. Wells 
Mrs. A. R. Wheeler 
The Mary C. W^heeler School 
Miss Ruth A. W^hipple 
Mrs. Gustave J. S. White 
Mrs. Robert H. Whitmarsh 
Miss Helen L. Whiton 
Mr. Herbert W. Widmann 
Mrs. Anna U. Wilcox 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Louis P. Willemin, Jr. 

Mrs. Grace E. W'illiams 

Dr. and Mrs. H. W. Williams 

Mr. and Mrs. 

Charles P. Williamson 

Mr. Claude M. Wood 

Miss Mabel Woolsey 

Mr. Ellis L. Yatman 



February 28, 1949 



Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 

Three hundredth Concert in Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FOURTH CONCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, March i, at 8:30 o'clock 



CoRELLi Sarabande, Gigue and Badinerie 

(arranged for String Orchestra by Ettore Pinelli) 

Debussy "La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques 

I. De I'aube a midi sur la mer 
II. Jeux de vagues 
ni. Dialogue du vent et de la mer 

INTERMISSION 

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68 

I. Un poco sostenuto; Allegro 

II. Andante sostenuto 

III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso 

IV. Adagio; Allegro non troppo, ma con brio 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

In conformance with City Regulations ladies are 
respectfully requested to remove their hats 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are given 
each Monday (WJAR) , on the National Broadcasting Company Net- 
work. 



[5] 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYERS' Liabiliiy AMMUranee Corporaliom Ltd. 
The EMPLOYERS' Fin /luurance Company 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS' liuurane* Company 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask wh y ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are fire traps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . .and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 

Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[6] 



SUITE {SARABANDE - GIGUE - BADINERIE) 

By Arcangelo Corelli 

Born at Fusignano, near Imola, Italy, February 17 (?) , 1653; died at Rome, 

January 8, 1713 

(Arranged for String Orchestra by Ettore Pinelli) 



Corelli wrote five sets of sonatas, each containing twelve numbers, and as a sixth 
opus a set of concerti grossi. His Opus 5, consisting of twelve sonatas for violin, 
with basso continuo ("Suonate a Violono e Violone o Cembalo") was published at 
Rome in 1700. Corelli's famous violin piece, "La Folia," in itself an arrangement 
of a traditional air, is in the last sonata of this series. Ettore Pinelli (1843-1915) 
has chosen three movements from these sonatas for the present suite. 

CORELLI was a personage' of widespread fame in his day. The partic- 
ulars of his career are largely fabulous, and little is known of his 
early life. Various anecdotes about him have been handed down, each 
always quoted with an appendage of doubt as to its authenticity. 
Certain it is that he was the prime spirit in the development of 
music by bowed instruments when instrumental music found its first 
full flowering in seventeenth-century Italy. If his was not a profoundly 
original talent, he gave a great impetus to the art of violin playing 



For Better Luggage -^^^P'^ 

To suit the taste v^nllLll^ri 

of the most discriminating — tliji 11 luw 

And Leather Goods ^oviaC^ 

From a carefully chosen selection 

VISIT 

U. Oy. <J^ounA Co., Xil 

52 Washington Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 







Chez Llise 






ECONOMICAL EXCLUSIVEN ESS 


Suits 




Coats Dresses 




246 


THAYER STREET, PROVIDENCE 



[7] 



by his example as virtuoso, to solo and concerted music by his com- 
positions, published and widely circulated in his time. 

Of his earlier years little is known, save that he studied violin with 
Giovanni Benvenuti at Bologna, composition with Matteo Simonelli 
at Rome. He became a player in the Capranica Theatre Orchestra in 
Rome as a youth of eighteen. It is said that in the ensuing years he 
exhibited his skill before the Elector of Bavaria at Munich, the Elec- 
tor George at Hanover; the tale is told that when he visited Paris the 
jealous Lulli stirred up so much talk against him that he was obliged 
to leave (this was denied by Fetis) . In 1682 he settled at Rome, and 
as first musician to the Cardinal Ottoboni became forthwith the shin- 
ing light of musical culture in that capital. A celebrity who held a 
similar position at the court of Naples w^s the elder Scarlatti. Dr. 
Burney relates an anecdote which he learned from "a very particular 
and intelligent friend," who had it from Geminiani, who many years 
before had been Corelli's pupil. Burney's roundabout information is 
to the effect that Corelli, visiting the Neapolitan court, made a glar- 
ing error in performance in which Alessandro Scarlatti had to set 
him straight. That, in the midst of a performance of one of his last 
adagios, "the king, being tired, quitted the room to the great morti- 
fication of Corelli." Returning to Rome, he found his fame somewhat 
supplanted by an upstart musician by the name of Valentini, and 




xeiro 



d-fTlu 



SIC 



Established 1910 

45 Snow Street— Providence 3, R. I. GA 4833 

Publishers — Importers — Dealers 

Headquarters for the Music Profession 

CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARTISTS DO 

COME IN AND BROWSE :— Band and orchestral instruments 
and music — Popular music, new and old — Music teachers' and 
Music School supplies — Records, all makes. Classic, Popular and 
Jazz — Repair department. 

38 Years of Continuous Service to the Music Profession ■■■ 




METAL CRAFTS SHOP 

The specialty shop for things in metal 
Antique and modern copper, brass and pewter. 

Jewelry and small pieces of silver. 
Excellent metal polish, — repairing, — restoring. 

10 THOMAS STREET, PROVIDENCE, R.L 




[8] 



was thrown into "such a state of melancholy and chagrin as was 
thought," said Geminiani, "to have hastened his death." Dying a 
wealthy man, Corelli made the grand gesture of bequeathing his en- 
tire fortune, which has been variously named as the equivalent of 
thirty thousand dollars and three hundred thousand dollars, together 
with a fine collection of paintings, to his patron. The Cardinal saw 
his Christian duty, and handed the "saint-seducing gold" to Corelli's 
poor relatives. The pictures his conscience permitted him to retain. 
Corelli has been described as "modest, amiable, simple in his ways 
of life, almost shabbily dressed, always going on foot instead of taking 
a carriage." But there is no lack of extravagant praise from his con- 
temporaries. One of his countrymen called him "// virtuosissimo di 
violino e vero Orfeo di nostri tempi," and George Mattheson, in Ger- 
many, named him "the prince of all musicians." His pupil, 
Geminiani, issued a more considered judgment. "His merit was not 
depth of learning like that of Alessandro Scarlatti, nor great fancy or 
rich invention in melody or harmony, but a nice ear and most delicate 
taste which led him to select the most pleasing harmonies and melodies, 
and to construct the parts so as to produce the most delightful effect 

upon the ear." 

[copyrighted] 




Oii\ OnCf 



THIRT6€n SOUTH flnG€LL STR€€T 
PROVID€nC€ • RHOD6 ISLflRD 




Sportswear 

Dresses 

Blouses 

Suits 

modeiCLtely 
priced 



Telephone MAnnlng 0506 



(i )aftel£.B>ti(JatCi 

•HAIRDRCSSeRS 

Male Experts 
Hair Styling and Permanent Waves 
286 THAYER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



"THE SEA" (Three Orchestral Sketches) 
By Claude Debussy 

Born at Saint-Germain (Seine-et-Oise) , France, August 22, 1862; 
died at Paris, March 25, 1918 



It was in the years 1903-05 that Debussy composed "La Mer." It was first per- 
formed at the Concerts Lamoureux in Paris, October 15, 1905. The first per- 
formance at the Boston Symphony concerts was on March 2, 1907, Dr. Karl Muck 
conductor (this was also the first performance in the United States) . 

"La Mer*' is scored for piccolo, two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, 
three bassoons, double bassoon, four horns, three trumpets, two cornets-d-pistons, 
three trombones, tuba, cymbals, triangle, tam-tam, glockenspiel (or celesta) , 
timpani, bass drum, two harps, and strings. 

Debussy made a considerable revision of the score, which was published in 1909. 

WHEN Debussy composed "La Mer: Trois Esquisses Symphoni- 
ques," he was secure in his fame, the most argued composer in 
France, and, to his annoyance, the most imitated. "L'Apres-midi d'un 
Faune" of 1894 and the Nocturnes of 1898 were almost classics, and 
the first performance of "Pelleas et Melisande" was a recent event 
(1902). Piano, chamber works, songs were to follow "La Mer" with 
some regularity; of larger works the three orchestral "Images" were to 
occupy him for the next six years. "Lc Martyr de St. Sebastien" was 
written in 1911; "Jeux" in 1912. 




OF PAR IB 

HAIR STYLIST 

Permanent Wave and Hair Cutting Specialist 
Put Your Head in EMILE'S Hands 

121 MEDWAY STREET 
off Wayland Avenue 

PROVIDENCE, R. I. 
For Appointment Call Dexter 8914 



Smart Clothes . . . 






334 Westminster Street •> " * Providence 

[10] 



In a preliminary draft* of "La Mer" Debussy labeled the first 
movement "Mer Belle anx lies Sanguinaires'*; he was attracted prob- 
ably by the sound of the words, for he was not familiar with Corsican 
scenery. The title "Jeux de Vagues'* he kept; the finale was originally 
headed "Le Vent fait danser la mer." 

There could be no denying Debussy's passion for the sea: he fre- 
quently visited the coast resorts, spoke and wrote with constant en- 
thusiasm about "my old friend the sea, always innumerable and beauti- 
ful." He often recalled his impressions of the Mediterranean at Cannes, 
where he spent boyhood days. It is worth noting, however, that 
Debussy did not seek the seashore while at work upon his "La Mer." 
His score was with him at Dieppe, in 1904, but most of it was written 
in Paris, a milieu which he chose, if the report of a chance remark 
is trustworthy, "because the sight of the sea itself fascinated him to 
such a degree that it paralyzed his creative faculties." When he went 
to the country in the summer of 1903, two years before the completion 
of "La Mer," it was not the shore, but the hills of Burgundy, whence 
he wrote to his friend Andre Messager (September 12) : "You may 
not know that I was destined for a sailor's life and that it was only 
quite by chance that fate led me in another direction. But I have al- 



* This draft, dated "Sunday, March 5 at six o'clock in the evening," is in present posses- 
sion of the Eastman School of Music at Rochester. 



ROSE ROBIIVSOX 

House of Famous Labels 
Suits Gowns Coats Blouses 

HATTIE BARBOUR HATS 

290 WESTMINSTER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



CURRENT BOOKS 

by some of the authors who have been at THE BOOK SHOP : 

ANGELL'S LANE, George L. Miner, $5.00 

THIS IS PROVIDENCE, photographs by Beth Murray, $1.00 

REMEMBRANCE ROCK, by Carl Sandburg, $5.00 

THE HALF-PINT JINNI AND OTHER STORIES, by 

Maurice Dolbier, $2.50 
A GHOST TOWN ON THE YELLOWSTONE by Elliot 
Paul, $3.50 

_ ^ ,^^ WHILE BENEFIT STREET WAS YOUNG, by Margaret 

Book Shoo ^' Stillwell. $L25 

5Qfo,venorm/din^ ^'ne for^your library shelves 

VrOVidehCQ O %*<.!. (Watch for an additional list of books and authors in 

the next program) 

TUE BOOK SBOP S GROSVENOR BUILDING 

PROVIDENCE 3. R. I. 




TAe 



[»»] 






THE WORLD'S GREA1 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs 
through the ''Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor 
"Crestwood" ! Hear your treasured recordings brilliantly repro- 
duced! De luxe automatic record changer with "Silent Sapphire" 
permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short-wave radio. AC. Victrola 
8V151. "Victrola"—!. M. Reg. U. S. Pat. Off. 




HAVE YOU HEA^f 



r 12 1 




MUMmitM 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you a wealth of his 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor — Beethoven. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor; with Frances Yeend; Eunice Alberts; 

• David Lloyd; James Pease; and the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus under 
the direction of Robert Shaw. DM-1190, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor 'Red Seal' 
De Luxe Records), $17. 

• Francesco do Rimini, Op. 32— Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge. Koussevitzky, Cond. Album DM-llZ?, $4.75. 

• Symphony No. 5, in B-Flot- Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-1215, $4.75. 

All prices ore suggested list, subject to chonge without notice, exclusive of locol taxes. 
( 'DM" and "DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



RTISTS ARE 



Onj 



VbOK^imk 



•^ 



f NEW RCA VICTOR SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



•3 



ways retained a passionate love for her [the sea]. You will say that 
the Ocean does not exactly wash the Burgundian hillsides — and my 
seascapes might be studio landscapes; but I have an endless store of 
memories, and to my mind they are worth more than the reality, 
whose beauty often deadens thought." 

Debussy's deliberate remoteness from reality, consistent with his 
cultivation of a set and conscious style, may have drawn him from 
salty actuality to the curling lines, the rich detail and balanced 
symmetry of Hokusai's "The Wave." In any case, he had the famous 
print reproduced upon the cover of his score. His love for Japanese 
art tempted him to purchases which in his modest student days were 
a strain upon his purse. His piano piece, "Poissons d'or," of 1907, was 
named from a piece of lacquer in his possession. 

What other writers deplored in Debussy's new score when it was 
new, M. D. Calvocoressi, who was then among the Parisian critics, 
welcomed as "a new phase in M. Debussy's evolution; the inspiration 
is more robust, the colors are stronger, the lines more definite." Louis 
Laloy, who was always Debussy's prime rhapsodist, wrote in the same 
vein. Until that time his music had been "an art made up of sugges- 
tions, nuances, allusions, an evocative art which awoke in the hearer's 





W^^ 



INCORPORATED 

ESTABLISHED 1840 



MAKERS OF EMAGRIN TABLETS FOR THE RELIEF OF PAIN, 
ESPECIALLY TO REDUCE DISCOMFORT OR FEVER RESULTING 
FROM SIMPLE HEADACHES, NEURALGIAS AND COMMON COLDS 

459 BOYLSTON STREET As BEACON STREET 41 f WESTMINSTER STREET 

BOSTON BOSTON PROVIDENCE 



A. W. FAIRCHILD & CO. INC. 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS & GIFTS 

ARCADE BUILDING 
PROVIDENCE 



[H] 



soul echoes of thoughts that were not merely vague, but intentionally 
incomplete; an art capable of creating delightful impressionistic pic- 
tures out of atmospheric vibrations and effects of light, almost without 
any visible lines or substance. Without in any way abandoning this 
delicate sensitiveness, which is perhaps unequalled in the world of art, 
his style has today become concise, decided, positive, complete; in a 

word, classical." 

It would be hard to think of a score more elusive than "La Mer" 

to minute analysis. The cyclic unity of the suite is cemented by the 

recurrence in the last movement of the theme in the first, heard after 

the introductory measures from the muted trumpet and English horn. 

A theme for brass, also in the opening sketch, becomes an integral 

part of the final peroration. Music to set the imagination aflame, it 

induced from the pen of Lawrence Gilman one of his most evocative 

word pictures: 

"Debussy had what Sir Thomas Browne would have called 'a solitary 

and retired imagination.' So, when he essays to depict in his music 

such things as dawn and noon at sea, sport of the waves, gales and 

surges and far horizons, he is less the poet and painter than the 

spiritual mystic. It is not chiefly of those aspects of winds and waters 

that he is telling us, but of the changing phases of a sea of dreams, 

a chimerical sea, a thing of strange visions and stranger voices, of 




100 
PROOF 



TO KENTUCKY HOSPITALITY 

ONE key turns in the door of a gracious 
Kentucky home. The other key unlocks to 
your enjoyment the favorite Bonded Bour- 
bon of Kentuckians... robust in flavor, with 
distinctive bouquet. Enjoy the genuine sour 
mash Bourbon Kentuckians prefer. Ask for 
010 FITZGERALD today. 

OLD FASHIONED.. -^^.^^^^.^ 

OlDFITZGERALD 



[15 1 



fantastic colors and incalculable winds — a phantasmagoria of the 
spirit, rife with evanescent shapes and presences that are at times 
sunlit and dazzling. It is a spectacle perceived as in a trance, vaguely 
yet rhapsodically. There is a sea which has its shifting and lucent sur- 
faces, which even shimmers and traditionally mocks. But it is a sea 
that is shut away from too curious an inspection, to whose murmurs 
or imperious command not many have wished or needed to pay heed. 
"Yet, beneath these elusive and mysterious overtones, the reality of 
the living sea persists: the immemorial fascination lures and enthralls 
and terrifies; so that we are almost tempted to fancy that the two are, 
after all, identical — the ocean that seems an actuality of wet winds 
and tossing spray and inexorable depths and reaches, and that un- 
charted and haunted and incredible sea which opens before the magic 
casements of the dreaming mind." 

I copyrighted] 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 

Refresher courses in music education and theoretical subjects; courses in 

counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 

individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-September 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 



^ OLLIDGE 

Boston and Wellesley 




Unmistakably identified with Quality • . 

your store, our store, C. Crawford Hollidge. Here you 
find first fashions first . . . individualized coats, 
suits, dresses, and the accessories with 
which to complement them. 

May we have the pleasure of showing 
our newest collections to YOU? 



[ '6] 



SYMPHONY IN C MINOR, NO. i, Op. 68 
By Johannes Brahms 
Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, 1897 



The First Symphony of Brahms had its initial performance November 4, 1876. 
at Carlsruhe, Otto Dessoff conducting. 

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
contra-bassoon, four horns, tw^o trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings. 
The trombones are used only in the finale. 

THE known fact that Brahms made his first sketches for the sym- 
phony under the powerful impression of Beethoven's Ninth, which 
he had heard in Cologne for the first time in 1854, may have led his 
contemporaries to preconceive comparisons between the two. Walter 
Niemann, not without justice, finds a kinship between the First Sym- 
phony and Beethoven's Fifth through their common tonality of C 
minor, which, says Niemann, meant to Brahms "hard, pitiless struggle, 
daemonic, supernatural shapes, sinister defiance, steely energy, drama- 
tic intensity of passion, darkly fantastic, grisly humor." He calls it 
"Brahms' Pathetic Symphony." 

The dark and sinister side of the C minor Symphony seems to have 
taken an unwarranted hold on the general consciousness when it was 



A. 


S. BUNN& CO. 




GR CERS 


273 


THAYER STREET 


s. s. 


PIERCE ASSOCIATE 


FINE WINES & LIQUORS | 


GA 1206 


WE DELIVER 



Custom Tailored Garments for Women 

Scotch Tweed Coats, Capes and Suits made 

for women who appreciate careful tailoring 

and lovely materials. 

Choice of many attractive styles, and 
500 of the very finest Scotch Tweeds. 

Pricea are reasonable. 

Romanes & Paterson 

581 Boylston Street, Boston In Copley Square 



[»7] 



new. For a long while controversy about its essential character waxed 
hot after every performance. W. F. Apthorp bespoke one faction when 
he wrote in 1878 of the First Symphony that it "sounds for the most 
part morbid, strained and unnatural; most of it even ugly." Philip 
Hale, following this school of opinion, some years later indulged in a 
symbolic word picture, likening the symphony to a "dark forest" where 
"it seems that obscene, winged things listen and mock the lost." But 
Philip Hale perforce greatly modified his dislike of the music of 
Brahms as with the passage of years its oppressive aspects were somehow 
found no longer to exist. 

Instead of these not always helpful fantasies of earlier writers or a 
technical analysis of so familiar a subject, let us turn to the characteris- 
tic description by Lawrence Gilman, the musician who, when he 

touched upon the finer things in his art, could always be counted upon 
to impart his enthusiasm with apt imagery and quotation: 

The momentous opening of the Symphony (the beginning of an 
introduction of thirty-seven measures, Un poco sostenuto, 6-8) is one 
of the great exordiums of music — a majestic upward sweep of the 
strings against a phrase in contrary motion for the wind, with the 
basses and timpani reiterating a somberly persistent C. The following 
Allegro is among the most powerful of Brahms' symphonic move- 
ments. 

In the deeply probing slow movement we get the Brahms who is 
perhaps most to be treasured: the musical poet of long vistas and 
grave meditations. How richly individual in feeling and expression 
is the whole of this Andante sostenutol No one but Brahms could 
have extracted the precise quality of emotion which issues from the 
simple and heartfelt theme for the strings, horns, and bassoon in the 
opening pages; and the lovely complement for the oboe is inimitable 
— a melodic invention of such enamouring beauty that it has lured 
an unchallengeably sober commentator into conferring upon it the 
attribute of "sublimity." Though perhaps "sublimity" — a shy bird, 
even on Olympus — is to be found not here, but elsewhere in this 
symphony. 

The third movement (the Poco allegretto e grazioso which takes the 
place of the customary Scherzo) is beguiling in its own special loveli- 
ness; but the chief glory of the symphony is the Finale. 

Here — if need be — is an appropriate resting-place for that diffi- 
dent eagle among epithets, sublimity. Here there are space and air 
and light to tempt its wings. The wonderful C major song of the 
horn in the slow introduction of this movement {Piii Andante, 4-4), 
heard through a vaporous tremolo of the muted strings above softly 
held trombone chords, persuaded William Foster Apthorp that the 
episode was suggested to Brahms by "the tones of the Alpine horn, 
as it awakens the echoes from mountain after mountain on some of 
the high passes in the Bernese Oberland." This passage is interrupted 

[18] 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evenino^ July i6\ „ 

^ c) J J I Extra concerts 

Sunday afternoon July 17 f (Bach-Mozart- 
Saturday evening July 23/ "s^hubert) 

Sunday afternoon ]u\y 24 1 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28] 

Saturday evening ]\x\y 30/ SERIES A 

Sunday afternoon July 31) 

Thursday evening August 4 j 

Saturday evening '. August 6 . SERIES B 

Sunday afternoon August 7 \ 

Thursday evening August 11] 

Saturday evening August 13V SERIES C 

Sunday afternoon August 14' 



For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, apply at the sub- 
scription office in Symphony Hall. 



L^9] 



SYMPHONY HALL, BOSTON 

SUNDAY, MARCH 27 

IN TWO PARTS, BEGINNING AT 3 AND 8 

PENSION FUND 

CONCERT BY THE 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



BACH'S 

MASS IN B MINOR 



Assisted by the 

HARVARD GLEE CLUB 

AND 

RADCLIFFE CHORAL SOCIETY 

(G. WALLACE WOODWORTH, Conductor) 
SOLOISTS TO BE ANNOUNCED 



Tickets at box office: $2, $2.50, $3, $3.50, $4, I4.80 (Tax included) 



[20] 



by a foreshadowing of the majestic chorale-like phrase for the trom- 
bones and bassoons which later, when it returns at the climax of the 
movement, takes the breath with its startling grandeur. And then 
comes the chief theme of the Allegro — that spacious and heartening 
melody which sweeps us onward to the culminating moment in the 
Finale: the apocalyptic vision of the chorale in the coda, which may 
recall to some the exalted prophecy of Jean Paul: "There will come 
a time when it shall be light; and when man shall awaken from 
his lofty dreams, and find his dreams still there, and that nothing has 
gone save his sleep." 



Not until he was forty-three did Brahms present his First Sym- 
phony to the world. His friends had long looked to him expectantly to 
carry on this particular glorious German tradition. As early as 1854 
Schumann, who had staked his strongest prophecies on Brahms' future, 
wrote to Joachim: "But where is Johannes? Is he flying high, or only 
under the flowers? Is he not yet ready to let drums and trumpets 
sound? He should always keep in mind the beginning of the Beethoven 
symphonies: he should try to make something like them. The begin- 
ning is the main thing; if only one makes a beginning, then the end 
comes of itself." Schumann, that shrewd observer, knew that the brief 



METROPOLITAN THEATRE PROVIDENCE 

Season 1948—1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 

Five Tuesday Evening Concerts at 8:30 

Remaining concert March 29 
LEONARD BERNSTEIN Conducting 

Remaining Single Tickets for the March 29 concert will be on sale 
beginning Wednesday, March 23, at the Avery Piano Co., 
256 Weybosset St., Providence 



[«i] 



beginnings of Brahms were apt to germinate, to expand, to lead him 
to great ends. Also, that Beethoven, symphonically speaking, would 
be his point of departure. 

To write a symphony after Beethoven was "no laughing matter," 
Brahms once wrote, and after sketching a first movement he admitted 
to Hermann Levi — "I shall never compose a symphony I You have no 
conception of how the likes of us feel when we hear the tramp of a 
giant like him behind us." 

To study Brahms is to know that this hesitancy was not prompted 
by any craven fear of the hostile pens which were surely lying in wait 
for such an event as a symphony from the newly vaunted apostle of 
classicism. Brahms approached the symphony (and the concerto too) 
slowly and soberly; no composer was ever more scrupulous in the com- 
mitment of his musical thoughts to paper. He proceeded with elaborate 
examination of his technical equipment — with spiritual self-question- 
ing — and with unbounded ambition. The result — a period of fourteen 
years between the first sketch and the completed manuscript; and a 
score which, in proud and imposing independence, in advance upon all 
precedent — has absolutely no rival among the first-born symphonies, 
before or since. 

His first attempt ai a symphony, made at the age of twenty, was 
diverted in its aim, the first two movements eventually becoming the 
basis of his piano concerto No. i, in D minor. He sketched another 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



Jones Warehouses, Inc. 

For more than 50 years rendering an exceptionally fine 
service in Furniture Storage, and in Dependable Moving, 
both local and long distance. 

59 CENTRAL ST., PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

"Rhode Island's Largest Household Storage Firm" 



[22] 



first movement at about the same time (1854), but it lay in his desk for 
years before he feh ready to take the momentous plunge. "For about 
fourteen years before the work appeared," writes D. Millar Craig,* 
"it was an open secret among Brahms' best friends that his first sym- 
phony was practically complete. Professor Lipsius of Leipzig Univer- 
sity, who knew Brahms well and had often entertained him, told me 
that from 1862 onwards, Brahms almost literally carried the manu- 
script score about with him in his pocket, hesitating to have it made 
public Joachim and Frau Schumann, among others, knew that the 
symphony was finished, or at all events practically finished, and lu-ged 
Brahms over and over again to let it be heard. But not until 1876 could 
his diffidence about it be overcome." 

It would be interesting to follow the progress of the sketches. We 
know from Madame Schumann that she found the opening, as origi- 
nally submitted to her, a little bold and harsh, and that Brahms ac- 
cordingly put in some softening touches. "It was at Munster am Stein," 
.(1862) says Albert Dietrich, "that Brahms showed me the first move- 
ment of his symphony in C minor, which, however, only appeared 
much later, and with considerable alterations." 



• British Broadcasting Corporation Orchestra programme notes. 

r copyrighted] 



WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 
24(3 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

IStudio : Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maldfu 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Miisic 

25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 



PROVIDENCE MUSIC TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 



ARTHUR EINSTEIN 

PIANIST 

Former Professor of Piano at the Odessa Conservatory (Russia) 

Studios: i6 Conrad Bldg., 349 Morris Avenue 

Phone: GA 11 44 




CONCERT PIANIST 

State Accredited 

Graduate and Teacher of Dr. Hoch's 

Conservatory, Frankfort, Germany 

Individual Lessons 

Two Pianoforte Ensemble 

160 IRVING AVE. DE 5667 



FRANK E. STREETER 

PIANO and ENSEMBLE 

Studio, 26 CONRAD BUILDING 3 

Residence, 120 Williams Ave., East Providence, R. I. 14 



ALBERT WATERMAN 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 
170 MED WAY STREET Plantations 0226 

MONDAY MORNING MUSICAL CLUB STUDIOS 

SEASON 1948-1949 



LYDIA BELL MORRIS, piano. Monday and 

Tuasday afternoons. 

BERTHA WOODWARD, piano, voice, 
Monday, Friday, and Saturday afternoons. 

IRENE MULICK, piano. Monday. Tuesday, 
and Saturday mornings. 



ELSIE LOVELL HANKINS. voice. Tuesday 
and Wednesday all day. 

BEATRICE WARDEN ROBERTS, piano, 
voice, Wednesday and Saturday all day. 

BEATRICE BALL BATTEY, violin, Thursday 
afternoon. 



AGNES COUTANCHE BURKE, voice. Friday afternoon 

Mason & Hamlin and Steinway Grand Pianos 

Studios available for small recitals and 2-piano practice 

Apply to Studio secretary for information between 11 and i 

63 WASHINGTON ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. MA 2318 



t«4] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^^^\f2'if^Zi:'^'^^'^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5, 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

BeethoTen Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis ; 

Overture to "Egmont" 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La ^ler," Sarabande 

Faur6 "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto ; Air from "Semele" (Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 3 

Harris Symphony No. 3 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto ( Soloist ; William Kapell > 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite; "Love for 
Three Oranges." Scherzo and March ; "Peter and 
tne Wolf" ; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite ; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

RachmaninoflF "Isle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) : 

Pavane, Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-Korsakov .... "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Satie Gymnopedie No. 1 

Shostakovitch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5; "Pohjola's D;iughter": 

"Tapiola" ; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fldelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (SanromS ) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5, 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade); Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 




'm'!^ 



(h> 



by richness oftone^ 
effortless action^ 
responsiveness. 



ISalittin 



THE CHOICE OF GREAT CONDUCTOR 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

Serge Koussevitzky — Boston Symphony— 
Baldwin . . . what a trio in the musical cul- 
ture of America! His preference for Baldwin 
is praise indeed: "A great work of musical art 
... a truly orchestral tone, round, full and of 
magnificent resonance and color! . . . For the 
orchestra, as well as tor my own use, the 
Baldwin is PERFECTION." 

We have set aside a Baldwin for you to try. 
Come in and hear it! 



BALDWIN ALSO BUILDS ACROSONIC, HAMILTON AND HOWARD PIANOS 

THE BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY 

In Providence: AXELROD-MUSiC CO., 45 Snow Street 

Eastern Headquarters: — 20 EAST 54TH STREET, NEW YORK CITY 







5iL 






% 



\ 



BOSTON 



SYMPHONY 
ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



^ 



7 






"^^^^ 



i>Ts-^ 



^ 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948 -1949 

Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



ViOUNS 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 

Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 

Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir Resnikoff 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
D'lniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos Pinfield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 
Minot Beale 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 

Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 

Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 
Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 

Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 

Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhap^ 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 

Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 
Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 

Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 

John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 
Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 

Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 
Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Stembuig 
Charles Smith 



Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 






SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin of the 
Fifth Concert 

TUESDAY EVENING, March 29 

with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 

The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Roger I. Lee 

Alvan T. Fuller Lewis Perry 

Jerome D. Greene Henry B. Sawyer 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver Wolcott 

George E. Judd, Manager 



[1] 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1.50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1.25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1.00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 

■ CKlllU/ Incorporated 
CHICAGO 26 



•DOCTOR OF HUMANITIES " 

When an honorary degree was con- 
ferred upon Serge Koussevitzky by Rol- 
lins College at Winter Park, Florida, 
last February, the following "oration" 
was delivered by Nathan Comfort Starr: 

Those who are familiar with per- 
formances of the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra can never forget those electrify- 
ing moments when, with the orchestra 
playing fortissimi, at a time when other 
conductors would be demanding the eyes 
of the audience by dramatically outflung 
gestures, Serge Koussevitzky drops his 
hands for some measures and carries the 
performance forward by the quick glance 
and the lift of the head. Here is a symbol 
both of the confident command of the 
conductor and his respect for the artist 
which have given Koussevitzky a place 
virtually unique in modern music. That 
anomaly among imaginative creators, a 
perfectionist who has seen his perfection 
achieved, he has made the Boston Sym- 
phony Orchestra during the twent>'-five 
years of conductorship an unbelievably 
unified^ flexible and beautiful instrument. 
He has brought to the West the im- 
peccable musicianship of Europe. And 
he has brought something else which is 
close to the American heart, something 
that he may have learned in his younger 
days when he carried a symphony or- 
chestra by river steamer to remote parts 
of Russia: a deep faith in the creative 
musical capacity of a great people. It is 
safe to say that no one man has done 
more than Koussevitzky to befriend and 
develop the modern American composer: 
Aaron Copland, Roy Harris, Walter 
Piston and a host of others; no one 
man has built a more enduring musical 
institution in America than the Berk- 
shire Festival and School of Music. 

Mr. President, I have the honor to 
present Serge Koussqj^^itzky for the de- 
gree of Doctor of Humanities. 
President Holt: 

Serge Koussevitzky, surpassing musi- 
cian, not only as one of the greatest 
masters in musical history of that diflB- 



[2] 



cult instrument, the double bass, but 
also as the presiding genius over an in- 
comparable orchestra, you have won the 
right to America's enduring gratitude. 
For your consummate artistry as a con- 
ductor, for the fruitful vigor of your en- 
couragement to young American com- 
posers and for the vision which led you 
to create at "Tanglewood" a great cen- 
ter for the enrichment of the most uni- 
versal of the seven arts, Rollins College 
is proud to confer on you the Honorary 
Degree of Doctor of Humanities, and 
admit you to all its rights and privileges. 



BRITTEN'S NEW SYMPHONY 

The following paragraph appeared in 
the "New York Times": — 

Representatives of the Holland Festi- 
val announced some time ago they would 
be presenting the world premiere of 
Benjamin Britten's ''Spring Symphony." 
But Mr. Britten himself, it seems, has 
promised the first performance to Serge 
Koussevitzky. We have received a copy 
of a letter the composer wrote the con- 
ductor in November. Calling it "my 
latest child, your 'Spring Symphony'," 
he wrote: 

"I am hopeful that it will be done 
in time for you to play the work in 
April. I will let you have bulletins from 
time to time so that you can make your 
programs accordingly. I am sorry to be 
so diflficult and so unwilling to commit 
myself but the work is one of the big- 
gest and most serious that I have ever 
undertaken and I do not want it to come 
out to you unless I am entirely satisfied 
with every semiquaver." 

The new symphony will not be re- 
ceived in time for performance in April, 
but will be introduced by Dr. Koussevit- 
zky at the Berkshire Festival in August. 



C 




lothes 

for 

the 

lady 

of 

discriminating 

tastes > • • 

created 

by 

famous 

designers 

for 

women 

who 

know 

and 

appreciate 

fine 

things • • . 




Boston 

Providence 

Wellesley 



rsi 



m 


A 




\ 




1 








— There is no substitute for the best. . . . For that 
reason we have selected the finest, the leading names 
in pianos, radios, and organs. When you make a pur- 
chase from our carefully chosen stock of musical mer- 
chandise you are protected by our guarantee as well as 
the manufacturer's guarantee. We feature . . . 






THE Siidj'UVjCUl^ P.ANO 






KIMBALL SOHMER EVEREH 
CABLE-NELSON 






QapshwdL — T/iaqncuDDX, 

TELEVISION 






RADIO - PHONOGRAPHS 






m lOwdil^BfL. o.o.~ 






■^ 






= 


AVERY PIAVO CO. 

Sole Steinway Representative in Rhode Island, 

Eastern Conn., and Fall River Territory 

256 WEYBOSSET ST. 212 THAMES ST., NEWPORT 

















[41 



Metropolitan Theatre, Providence 

Three hundred and first Concert in Providence 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



FIFTH COiNCERT 

TUESDAY EVENING, March 29, at 8:30 o'clock 



LEONARD BERNSTEIN Conducting 
Schumann Overture to Byron's Manfred, Op. 115 

Beethoven Piano Concerto No. 1, in C major, Op. 15 

I. Allegro con brio 
II. Largo 
III. Rondo: Allegro 

INTERMISSION 

Debussy "Prelude a I'Apres-midi d'un Faune" 

^ (Eclogue by Stephane Mallarme) 

Stravinsky Suite from the Ballet, "L'Oiseau de Feu" 

Introduction: Kastchei's Enchanted Garden and Dance of the Fire-Bird 

Dance of the Princess 

Infernal Dance of all the Subjects of Kastchei 

Berceuse 

Finale 



SOLOIST 

LEONARD BERNSTEIN 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 

In conformance with City Kegulations ladies are 
respectfully requested to remove their hats 

Rehearsal Broadcasts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra are given 
each Monday (WJAR) , on the National Broadcasting Company Net- 
work. 



[5] 




The Treasurer's Report 
that Nobody Wanted to Hear 

It was bad news. Production was up. Sales were up. But 
profits took a nose dive. One item did it ... a hidden 
bombshell ... an embezzlement of several thousand dollars 
by a "faithful" employee with the company for twenty years. 

This goes on all the time. Your company might be next. 
Let The Employers' Group Man with the Plan show you 
how easy and mexpensive it is to prevent such losses with 
our Dishonesty Protection Plan. 

THE EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

110 Milk St., Boston 7, Mass. 
The Employers' Group Man is The Man with the Plan 




[6] 



LEONARD BERNSTEIN 

BORN in Lawrence, Massachusetts, August 25, 1918, Leonard Bern- 
stein attended the Boston Latin School and then Harvard College, 
graduating in 1939. He studied piano with Helen Coates, and later 
Heinrich Gebhard. He was at the Curtis Institute of Music in Phila- 
delphia for two years, w^here he studied conducting with Fritz Reiner, 
orchestration with Randall Thompson, and piano with Isabella 
Vengerova. At the first two sessions of the Berkshire Music Center 
at Tanglewood, he was accepted by Serge Koussevitzky in his conduct- 
ing class. Mr. Bernstein returned as his assistant in conducting in the 
third year of the School, 1942, and has been on the faculty in the 
same capacity since 1946. 

In the season 1943-44, he was assistant conductor of the New York 
Philharmonic Symphony Society. He has appeared with many orches- 
tras as guest conductor, having first conducted the Boston Symphony 
Orchestra, January 28, 1944. From 1945-1948 he was director of the 
New York City Symphony. He has conducted European orchestras as 
guest during the last three summers. 

He has wTitten a symphony Jeremiah, and the ballets Fancy Free 
and Facsimile, and the Broadway musical On the Town. Music in the 
smaller forms includes a Clarinet Sonata, the song cycles Five Kid 
Songs: I hate music, and La Bonne Cuisine. He is at w^ork upon an 
orchestral composition, wath piano solo, based on W. H. Auden's 
Age of Anxiety. 



U LUGOAGE \ 



For Better Luggage 
To suit the taste 
of. the most discriminating — 

And Leather Goods 

From a carefully chosen selection 

VISIT 

^ n^/ ^ound± Co., Jltd. 

52 Washington Street 
PROVIDENCE, R. I. 



Chez Elise 

ECONOMICAL EXCLUSIVEN ESS 

Suits Coats Dresses 

246 THAYER STREET, PROVIDENCE 



[7] 



OVERTURE TO BYRON'S "MANFRED," Op. 115 

By Robert Schumann 
Born at Zwickau, June 8, 1810; died at Endenich, July 29, 1856 



Schumann composed his music for Byron's "Manfred" in the latter part of 1848. 
The Overture, completed on November 4 at Dresden, had its first concert per- 
formance at the Gewandhaus in Leipzig, March 14, 1852, as part of a "Schumann 
evening," when Robert conducted from the manuscript. The first performance of 
the complete music — a stage production — was given at Weimar under the direc- 
tion of Franz Liszt, June 13, 1852. The first concert performance was at Leipzig, 
March 14, 1859, when Schumann conducted. The Overture was first played in 
New York at a Philharmonic concert November 21, 1857. The complete "Manfred" 
music was performed by the same orchestra May 8, 1869, when Edwin Booth im- 
personated Manfred. The Overture was first performed in Boston at a Harvard 
Musical Association concert November 17, 1869. The complete music was first heard 
in Boston when the Cecilia Society performed it April 24, 1880. Howard Malcolm 
Ticknor was the reader. The Overture was first performed at the Boston Symphony 
concerts February 24, 1882, and was last heard in the series April 17, 1931. There 
was a performance at a Tuesday afternoon concert December 18, 1934. The complete 
"Manfred" music was first performed by this orchestra March 21, 1884, and again 
in 1886, 1892 and 1899. Three orchestral excerpts were performed under M. 
Monteux's direction April 14, 1922. 

The Overture calls for the following orchestra: two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, 
two bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones, timpani and strings. 




xeir 



od-fTlu 



SIC 



Established 1910 

45 Snow Street— Providence 3, R. I. GA 4833 

Publishers — Importers — Dealers 

Headquarters for the Music Profession 

CHOOSE YOUR PIANO AS THE ARTISTS DO 

COME IN AND BROWSE :— Band and orchestral instruments 
and music — Popular music, new and old — Music teachers' and 
Music School supplies — Records, all makes. Classic. Popular and 
Jazz — Repair department. 

38 Years of Continuous Service to the Music Profession ^^m 




METAL CRAFTS SHOP 

The specialty shop for things in metal 

Antique and modern copper, brass and pewter. 

Jewelry and small pieces of silver. 
Excellent metal polish, — repairing, — restoring. 

10 THOMAS STREET, PROVIDENCE, R.L 




[8] 



DOES anybody read 'Manfred' or for that matter 'Childe Harold' 
today?" wrote Philip Hale as long ago as 1899 (Boston Journal, 
April 9) . "Is not the hero at rest and buried with the Giaour, Lara, 
Childe Harold, and the other scowling, mysterious, gloomy, melo- 
dramatic puppets contrived and dressed by the noble Lord, whose 
favorite tipple was gin and water?" 

We shall refrain from inquiring how many people read "Manfred" 
these many years later, or, doing so, respond to the dark despair of 
the Byronic figure as, oppressed by a past guilt, he stands upon the 
Jungfrau and rejects nature with its beauties as well as mankind 
with its frailties, commands all wisdom, Faust-wise, except the riddle 
which even the supernatural spirits he summons cannot answer for 
him. That riddle is the riddle of Hamlet: Will death bring the re- 
lease of oblivion? Byron, like Goethe, like Shakespeare, had a tre- 
mendous hold upon the imaginations of composers in the mid- 
century. Schumann's belief in "Manfred," as expressed in music, can 
still move us a hundred years later, even though the pulse of the 
poem itself may have weakened for some. Yet there is cosmic ex- 
panse in "Manfred," Alpine altitude, as when, standing "alone upon 
the cliffs," he sees an eagle passing: 




&ii\ OnQ 



THIRT€€n SOUTH flnG€LL STR€€T 
PROVIDenC6 • RHOD€ ISLflnO 




Sportswear 

Dresses 

Blouses 

Suits 

moderately 
priced 



Telephone MAnmng 0506 



41AIRDR6SSCRS 

Male Experts 
Hair Styling and Permanent Waves 
286 THAYER STREET PROVIDENCE, R. I. 

r9] 



"Ay. 
Thou winged and cloud-cleaving minister, 
Whose happy flight is highest into heaven. 
Well may'st thou swoop so near me — I should be 
Thy prey, and gorge thine eaglets; thou art gone 
Where the eye cannot follow thee; but thine 
Yet pierces downward, onward, or above. 
With a pervading vision. — Beautiful! 
How beautiful is all this visible world! 
How glorious in its action and itself; 
But we, who name ourselves its sovereigns, we. 
Half dust, half deity, alike unfit 
To sink or soar, with our mix'd essence make 
A conflict of its elements, and breathe 
The breath of degradation and of pride. 
Contending with low wants and lofty will 
Till our mortality predominates. 
And all men are — what they name not to themselves 
And trust not to each other." 

The apt imagery of Byron and his adroit euphony could have 
meant little to Schumann*; no more than it could have meant to 



• Schumann necessarily abridged some parts of the poem which he set to music. Most of 
the splendid soliloquy from which the above quotation is taken is omitted in concert per- 
formance. 




OF PARIS 

HAIR STYLIST 

Permanent Wave and Hair Cutting Specialist 
Put Your Head in EMILE'S Hands 

121 MEDWAY STREET 
ofF Wayland Avenue 

PROVIDENCE. R. I. 
For Appointment Call Dexter 8914 



Smart Clothes . . . 



i»j!i4UHi:Kiasi4 



334 Westminster Street - - - Providence 

[lO] 



Tchaikovsky, writing his "Manfred" Symphony, or Berhoz, writing 
his "Harold in Italy." Indeed it is doubtful whether the three com- 
posers together could have . mustered enough English to savor two 
consecutive lines in the original. But the sense of contemplation with- 
drawn from the world, the luxury of pessimism and extravagance of 
fervor, the fascination of the supernatural, some of the praise of nature, 
evidently came through in the translations into many languages. It 
must have been so, for Byron was often more admired and praised 
on the continent of Europe than in his own country. 

r copyrighted! 



<^^^^ 



ROSE ROBIXSON 



Suits 



House of Famous Labels 

Gowns Coats Blouses 



HATTIE BARBOUR HATS 



290 WESTMINSTER STREET 



PROVTOENCE, R. I. 



CURRENT ROOK.S 

by some of the authors who have been at THE BOCK SHOP: 

ANGELL'S LANE, George L. Miner, $5.00 

THIS IS PROVIDENCE, photographs by Beth Murray, $1.00 

REMEMBRANCE ROCK, by Carl Sandburg, $5.00 

THE HALF-PINT JINNI AND OTHER STORIES, by 

Maurice Dolbier, $2.50 
A GHOST TOWN ON THE YELLOWSTONE by EUiot 

Paul, ?3.50 
WHILE BENEFIT STREET WAS YOUNG, by Margaret 

B. Stillwell, $1.25 

FINE FOR YOUR LIBRARY SHELVES 

EXCELLENT GIFTS 

(Watch for an additional list of books and authors in 

the next program) 

5 GROSVENOR BUILDING 




Book Shop 

5 Qrosvenor'BuudinA 
"Providence 3,9^J. 



THE ROOK SHOP 



PROVIDENCE 3, R. I. 



[11] 




THE WORLD'S GREATER 



Hear "In Person" performance of your favorite radio programs 
through the ''Golden Throat" of this magnificent new RCA Victor 
''Crestwood"! Hear your treasured recordings brilliantly repro- 
duced! De luxe automatic record changer with ''Silent Sapphire" 
permanent-point pickup. AM, FM, short-wave radio. AC. Victroia 
8V151. "Victroia"— T. M. Reg. U. S. Pot. Off. 



[12] 




HAVE YOU HEAP3 




UMw^ 



m ^K Hh 



Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you a wealth of his 
greatest performances for encore after encore! Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor— Beethoven. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Conductor; with Frances Yeend; Eunice Alberts; 

David Lloyd; James Pease; and the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus under 
the direction of Robert Shaw. DM-n90, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor ^Red Seal' 
De Luxe Records), $17. 

• Francesco da Rimini, Op. 32— Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. Album DM-1179, $4.75. 

• Symphony No. 5, in B-Flat-Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra, 
Serge Koussevitzky, Cond. DM-1215, $4.75. 

All prices are suggested list, subject to change without notice, exclusive of local taxes. 
("DM" and "DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 



'ISTS ARE 



dfK) 



WJbK%mk 



,^ 



^'tW RCA VICTO R SHOW? 



SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NBC 



'.S 



PIANO CONCERTO NO. i in C major, Op. 15 

By LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 

Born at Bonn, December 16 (?) , 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827 



Composed in 1797, this Concerto had its first performance in Prague in 1798. 
It was published in 1801 and dedicated to the Princess Odescalcchi, nee Keglevics. 

The accompaniment is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
two trumpets, timpani, and strings. The performances December 10-11 were the 
first in the Friday and Saturday series. (This concerto was performed at a Cam- 
bridge concert of this orchestra December 12, 1895 — Marie Geselschap, soloist: at 
a Monday Evening concert February 15, 1932 — Robert Goldsand, soloist: and in 
Cambridge March 8, 1934 — Shirley Bagley, soloist.) 

THE Concerto in C major is the second in order of composition, 
the one in B-flat major having been composed in 1794.* Nothing 
Beethoven wrote is closer to Mozart than these two concertos. What 
Mozart had done in matching the two mediums must have held the 
destined successor in a sort of reverential awe.f But it was not the awe 
of constraint. The concertos tell, rather, of whole-hearted acceptance, 
warm idealization. In the two concertos Mozart's custom of a long 



* The Second Concerto has never been performed by this orchestra in Boston. 
t Beethoven was at an Augarten concert with John Cramer, the pianist-composer, when 
Mozart's Concerto in C minor (K. 491) was being performed. A fresh theme in the rondo 
brought from Beethoven the exclamation : "Cramer, Cramer ! We shall never be able to do 
anything like that." "As the theme was repeated and wrought to a climax," says Thayer 
who had the anecdote from Cramer's widow, "Beethoven, swaying his body to and fro, 
marked the time and in every possible manner manifested a delight rising to enthusiasm." 
This happened in 1799, while Beethoven's C major Concerto still lay in manuscript. 





P^?^2^ 



INCORPORAXeO 

ESTABLISHED 184.0 



MAKERS OF EMAGRIN TABLETS FOR THE RELIEF OF PAIN, 
ESPECIALLY TO REDUCE DISCOMFORT OR FEVER RESULTING 
FROM SIMPLE HEADACHES, NEURALGIAS AND COMMON COLDS 



459 BOYLSTON STREET 
BOSTON 



As BEACON STREET 
BOSTON 



41 r WESTMINSTER STREET 
PROVIDENCE 



A. W. FAIRCHILD & CO. INC. 

KITCHEN FURNISHINGS & GIFTS 

ARCADE BUILDING 
PROVIDENCE 



[14] 



orchestral exposition is closely imitated. The delayed entrance of the 
soloist is similarly effective as a free, pliable, individual voice — a 
device as dramatic as the first entrance of the principal actor in a 
play after dialogue to whip up suspense. Listening to this orchestra 
exposition, one can almost build up an illusion that it is Mozart 
indeed. Yet there are signs, and as the movement progresses the signs 
multiply: characteristic rising scales, twists of modulation. But there 
is another change — more pervasive, and more intimate. Beethoven's 
instruments begin to sing as Mozart's had; but in the very act of 
imitation the degree of incandescence is raised, the line broadened. 
This is particularly true of the C major Concerto, which reaches a 
greater point of glow than the one in B-flat. The orchestra is freer, 
as in the Largo, where the second strain (given to the orchestra and 
designed for it) finds an impassioned pulse. The horns are used al- 
ready with a special sense in this Concerto, and in the slow movement 
the clarinet stands out as it had not before. The orchestra is not 
yet liberated, but it is perceptibly finding itself. The Concerto is for- 
ward- as well as backward-looking, tapping at the door of happy dis- 
coveries to come and bringing to pass even through the fulfillment 
of formal expectations the spell of the poet Beethoven. 

The rondo is built upon a theme in delightful irregularity of phrase, 
first set forth in a light staccato by the piano. A second theme, in the 




100 
PROOF 



TO KENTUCKY HOSPITALITY 

ONE key turns in the door of a gracious 
Kentucky home. The other key unlocks to 
your enjoyment the favorite Bonded Bour- 
bon of Kentucklans... robust In flavor, with 
distinctive bouquet. Enjoy the genuine sour 
mash Bourbon Kentucklans prefer. Ask for 
01 FITZGERALD today. 

OLD FASHIONED...^^.^^;^.^.,^ 

OlD FITZGERALD 



\ '5l 



dominant key, given out by the strings, has been identified with the 
Austrian folksong "In Mantua in Banden der treue Hofer sass/' But 
the first theme holds the rudder, rondo fashion. Theme and episodes 
are carried out in the usual give and take of solo and tutti. 

In 1801, when Beethoven was looked upon by conservative musicians 
as an obstreperous young man, a Leipzig critic disapproved of his 
two-piano concertos, then just published, and drew a sharp complaint 
from the composer, directed at the publisher Hofmeister in that town: 
"As regards the Leipzig O — [oxen?], let them talk; they will cer- 
tainly never make anybody immortal by their twaddle, nor will they 
rob of their immortality those whom Apollo has favored." He also 
wrote to the firm of Breitkopf 8c Hartel in the following spring; 
"You should recommend to the Messrs. your critics greater care and 
wisdom." Their "howls" had given him a moment of humiliation, 
but he "could not get angry," realizing that "they did not understand 
their business." As a matter of fact, Beethoven himself was not satisfied 
with these two concertos, but his reason was the very opposite of the 
critic's objections — his orchestral thoughts were expanding as he 
then worked upon his Third Concerto in C minor. "They did not 
understand their business," if their business was to understand a 
Beethoven destined to do as wild and incredible things within the 
concerto as within the other musical forms. 

I COPYRIGHTEDl 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director Malcolm H. Holmes, Dean 

SUMMER SCHOOL, JULY 5 TO AUGUST 13 

Refresher courses in music education and theoretical subjects; courses in 

counterpoint, harmony and fundamentals of music. Students accepted for 

individual instruction in all fields of applied music and music subjects during 

the whole or any part of the period June 20-September 3. 

Details of enrollment, registration, and tuition on request. 



%%/ijojJ&ui ^ 




yOLLIDGE 

■ 1 Boston and Wellesley 



Unmistakably identified with Quality • . . 

your store, our store, C. Crawford Hollidge. Here you 
find first fashions first . . . individualized coats, 
suits, dresses, and the accessories with 
which to complement them. 

May we have the pleasure of showing 
our newest collections to YOU? 



[16] 



PRELUDE TO "THE AFTERNOON OF A FAUN" (After the 
Eclogue of Stephane Mallarme) 

By Claude Debussy 

Born at St. Germain (Seine and Oise), August 22, 1862; died at Paris, 

March 26, 1918 



Debussy completed his Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun in the summer of 
1894. The Prelude was performed at the concerts of the Soci6t6 Nationale, December 
22, 1894, Gustave Doret conducting. It was published in 1895. 

The orchestration is as follows: three flutes, two oboes and English horn, two 
clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two harps, antique cymbals, and strings. 

The first performance in the United States was by the Boston Orchestral Club. 
Georges Longy, conductor, April 1, 1902. The first performance by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra was December 30, 1904. The Prelude did not find its way 
into the concerts of the Paris Conservatoire until the end of 1913. 

IT would require a poet of great skill and still greater assurance to at- 
tempt a translation of Mallarme's rh)TQed couplets, his complex 
of suggestions, his "labyrinth," as he himself called it, "ornamented 
by flowers." Arthur Symons (in his The Symbolist Movement in 
Modern Literature) wrote: "The verse could not, I think, be trans- 
lated," and this plain dictum may be considered to stand. We shall 



A. 


S. BUNN & CO. 




GR OCERS 


273 


THAYER STREET 


S. S. 


PIERCE ASSOCIATE 


FINE WINES & LIQUORS | 


GA 1206 


WE DELIVER 



Custom Tailored Garments for Women 

Scotch Tweed Coats, Capes and Suits made 

for women who appreciate careful tailoring 

and lovely materials. 

Choice of many attractive styles, and 
500 of the very finest Scotch Tweeds. 

Prices are reasonable. 

Romanes & Paterson 

581 Boylston Street, Boston In Copley Square 



[17] 



therefore quote the faithful synopsis (quite unsuperseded) which 
Edmund Gosse made in his "Questions at Issue": 

"It appears in the florilege which he has just published, and I 
have now read it again, as I have often read it before. To say that 
I understand it bit by bit, phrase by phrase, would be excessive. 
But, if I am asked whether this famous miracle of unintelligibility 
gives me pleasure, I answer, cordially. Yes. I even fancy that I ob- 
tain from it as definite and as solid an impression as M. Mallarme 
desires to produce. This is what I read in it. A faun — a simple, 
sensuous, passionate being — wakens in the forest at daybreak and 
tries to recall his experience of the previous afternoon. Was he the 
fortunate recipient of an actual visit from nymphs, white and golden 
goddesses, divinely tender and indulgent? Or is the memory he 
seems to retain nothing but the shadow of a vision, no more sub- 
stantial than the 'arid rain' of notes from his own flute? He cannot 
tell. Yet surely there was, surely there is, an animal whiteness 
among the brown reeds of the lake that shines out yonder. Were 
they, are they, swans? No! But Naiads plunging? PerhapsI Vaguer 
and vaguer grows that impression of this delicious experience. He 
would resign his woodland godship to retain it. A garden of lilies, 
golden-headed, white-stalked, behind the trellis of red roses? Ah! the 
effort is too great for his poor brain. Perhaps if he selects one lily 
from the garth of lilies, one benign and beneficent yielder of her 
cup to thirsty lips, the memory, the ever-receding memory may be 
forced back. So when he has glutted upon a bunch of grapes, he 
is wont to toss the empty skins in the air and blow them out in a 
visionary greediness. But no, the delicious hour grows vaguer; ex- 
perience or dream, he will never know which it was. The sun is 
warm, the grasses yielding; and he curls himself up again, after 
worshipping the efficacious star of wine, that he may pursue the 
dubious ecstasy into the more hopeful boskages of sleep. 

"This, then, is what I read in the so excessively obscure and un- 
intelligible L'Apres-Midi d'un Faune; and, accompanied as it is 
with a perfect suavity of language and melody of rhythm, I know 
not what more a poem of eight pages could be expected to give. It 
supplies a simple and direct impression of physical beauty, of har- 
mony, of color; it is exceedingly mellifluous, when once the ear un- 
derstands that the poet, instead of being the slave of the Alexandrine, 
weaves his variations round it, like a musical composer." 

According to a line attributed to Debussy, the Prelude evokes "the 

successive scenes of the Faun's desires and dreams on that hot 

afternoon." 

[copyw^-hted] 



[18] 



1949 BERKSHIRE FESTIVAL 
At TANGLEWOOD 



Between LENOX and STOCKBRIDGE, MASSACHUSETTS 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



IN THE THEATRE-CONCERT HALL 

Saturday evening July 16' 

Sunday afternoon July 17 

Saturday evening July 23 

Sunday afternoon ]\x\y 24 

IN THE MUSIC SHED 

Thursday evening July 28 

Saturday evening July 30 

Sunday afternoon ]^^y 3' 

Thursday evening August 4 

Saturday evening August 6 

Sunday afternoon August 7 

Thursday evening August 1 1 

Saturday evening August 13' 

Sunday afternoon August 14' 



Extra concerts 
(Bach-Mozart- 
Hay dn- 
Schubert) 



SERIES A 



SERIES B 



SERIES C 



For further information about the Berkshire Festival or the 
Berkshire Music Center at Tanglewood, address Symphony 
Hall, Boston 15, Mass. 



[19] 



LIST OF WORKS 

Performed in the Providence Series 
DURING THE SEASON 1948-1949 



Albeniz Evocation from "Iberia," Suite 

(Orchestrated by E. Fernandez Arbos) 

III February i 

Beethoven Symphony No. 7 in A major, Op. 92 

I October 19 
Piano Concerto No. 1 in C major, Op. 15 

(Soloist: llEONARD BERNSTEIN) V March 29 

Brahms. Symphony No. 1 in C minor. Op. 68 

IV March 1 

Symphony No. 3 in F major. Op. 90 

II November 16 

Variations on a Theme by Haydn, Op. 56A 

I October 19 

Bruckner Adagio from the String Quintet 

II November 16 

, CoRELLi Sarabande, Gigue and Badinerie 

(arranged for String Orchestra by Ettore PinelH) 

IV March 1 
Debussy "La Mer," Trois Esquisses Symphoniques 

IV March 1 
"Prelude a I'Apres-midi d'un Faune'* 

(Eclogue by S. Mallarme) 

V March 29 
Glazounoff Symphony No. 4 in E-flat, Op. 48 

III February 1 
HoNEGGER Symphony for Strings I October 19 

RiMSKY-KoRSAKov Suite from the Opera, "The Fairy Tale 

of Tsar Saltan" (After Pushkin) 
II November 16 
"The Russian Easter, Overture on Themes of the Obichod," Op. 36 

III February 1 
Schumann Overture to Byron's Manfred, Op. 115 

V March 29 
Stravinsky Suite from the Ballet, "L'Oiseau de Feu" 

V March 29 
ViLLA-LoBOS. "Fantasia de movimentos mixtos," 

for Violin and Orchestra 
(Soloist: OSCAR BORGERTH) HI February 1 

(First performance in the United States) 

Vivaldi Concerto in D minor for Orchestra 

(Edited by A. Siloti) I October 19 

Weber Overture to "Euryanthe" 

II November 16 



Richard Burgin conducted on November 16, Eleazar de CARVALHo^on 
February 1, and Leonard Bernstein on March 29. 



[20] 



The 
Boston Symphony Orchestra 

CHARLES MUNCH, Conductor 

Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 

^J~innou}ices 
FOR ITS 

69th SEASON, 1949-1950 

<L^ Series of Five Concerts 

IN PROVIDENCE 

to be given on the following Tuesday Evenings: 

November 1 5 
January 3 
January 31 
March 7 
April 4 

Renewal cards will be mailed to all subscribers 
Address Inquiries to Symphony Hall, Boston, Mass. 
GEO. E. JUDD, Manager 



[2. ] 



SUITE FROM THE DANCED STORY, "THE FIRE-BIRD" 

By Igor Fedorovitch Stravinsky 

Born at Oranienbaum, near St. Petersburg, on June 17, 1882 



In the summer of 1909 Diaghilev asked Stravinsky to write a ballet founded on 
the old Russian legend of the Fire-Bird. The score was ready in May, 1910. The 
scenario was the work of Fokine. 

The first performance of the "Oiseau de Feu" a "Conte danse" in two scenes, 
was at the Paris Opera on June 25, 1910. The Fire-Bird, Tamara Karsavina; The 
Beautiful Tsarevna, Mme. Fokina; Ivan Tsarevitch, Fokine; Kastchei, Boulgakov. 
Gabriel Pierne conducted. The stage settings were by Golovine and Bakst. 

The first performance of the suite by the Boston Symphony Orchestra was on 
October 31, 1919: 

The composer revised the suite in a more modest orchestration in 1919. It was 
this form of the suite which Stravinsky, as guest conductor, included upon his 
program here, March 15, 1935. This orchestration was used by Andre Kostelanetz 
as guest conductor, March 24, 1944. It is used in the present performances. The 
orchestration calls for two flutes, two oboes, English horn, two clarinets, two 
bassoons, four horns, two trumpets, three trombones and tuba, timpani, bass drum, 
cymbals, triangle, xylophone, piano, harp, and strings. 

Fokine's scenario may thus be described. After a short prelude, the 
curtain rises and the grounds of an old castle are seen. Ivan 
Tsarevitch, the hero of many tales, in the course of hunting at night, 
comes to the enchanted garden and sees a beautiful bird with flaming 
golden plumage. She attempts to pluck fruit of gold from a silver tree. 
He captures her, but, heeding her entreaties, frees her. In gratitude, 
she gives him one of her feathers which has magic properties. The 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLINS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 
Opposite Symphony Hall KEnmore 6-9285 



Jones Warehouses, Inc. 

For more than 50 years rendering an exceptionally fine 
service in Furniture Storage, and in Dependable Moving, 
both local and long distance. 

59 CENTRAL ST., PROVIDENCE, R.I. 

"Rhode Island's Largest Household Storage Firm" 



[22] 



dawn breaks. Thirteen enchanted princesses appear, coming from the 
castle. Ivan, hidden, watches them playing with golden apples, and 
dancing. Fascinated by them, he finally discloses himself. They tell 
him that the castle belongs to the terrible Kastchei", who turns de- 
coyed travelers into stone. The princesses warn Ivan of his fate, but 
he resolves to enter the castle. Opening the gate, he sees Kastchei with 
his train of grotesque and deformed subjects marching towards him in 
pompous procession. Kastchei attempts to ^\'OTk his spell on Ivan, who 
is protected by the feather. Ivan summons the Fire-Bird, who causes 
Kastchei and his retinue to dance until they drop exhausted. The 
secret of Kastchei's immortality is disclosed to Ivan: the sorcerer keeps 
an egg in a casket; if this egg should be broken or even injured, he 
would die. Ivan swings the egg backwards and forwards. Kastchei and 
his crew sway with it. At last the egg is dashed to the ground; Kastchei 
dies; his palace vanishes; the petrified knights come to life; and Ivan 
receives, amid great rejoicing, the hand of the beautiful princess. 

rCOPYRir.HTFOl 

KOUSSEVITZKY MUNCH 

BERNSTEIN CARVALHO 

Vividly presented in action sketches and comment 
in a beautiful new book to be published soon — 

"AN EYE FOR MUSIC" 

Pictures and Text by 
MARTHA BURNHAM HUMPHREY 

Address inquiries to 

H. M. TEICH & CO., The Algonquin Press 

712 Beacon Street, Boston 15, Mass. 



WADSWORTH PRO VAN DIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 
246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio: Kenmore 6-9495 Residence: Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 

25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

r=3l 



PROVIDENCE MUSIC TEACHERS' DIRECTORY 

ARTHUR EINSTEIN 

PIANIST 

Former Professor of Piano at the Odessa Conservatory (Russia) 

Studios: i6 Conrad Bldg., 349 Morris Avenue 

Phone: GA 11 44 




CONCERT PIANIST 
State Accredited 

Graduate and Teacher of Dr. Hoch's 
Conservatory, Frankfort, Germany 

Individual Lessons 
Two Pianoforte Ensemble 

160 IRVING AVE. 



DE 5667 



FRANK E. STREETER 

PIANO and ENSEMBLE 

Studio, 26 CONRAD BUILDING 3 

Residence, i 20 Williams Ave., East Providence, R. I. 14 



ALBERT WATERMAN 

PIANOFORTE INSTRUCTION 

170 MED WAY STREET 



Plantations 0226 



MONDAY MORNING MUSICAL CLUB STUDIOS 

SEASON 1948-1949 



LYDIA BELL MORRIS, piano, Monday and 
Tuesday afternoons. 

BERTHA WOODWARD, piano, voice. 
Monday, Friday, and Saturday afternoons. 

IRENE MULICK. piano. Monday, Tuesday, 
and Saturday mornings. 



ELSIE LOVELL HANKINS. voice, Tuesday 
and Wednesday all day. 

BEATRICE WARDEN ROBERTS, piano, 
voice. Wednesday and Saturday all day. 

BEATRICE BALL BATTEY, violin. Thursday 
afternoon. 



AGNES COUTANCHE BURKE, voice, Friday afternoon 

Mason & Hamlin and Steinway Grand Pianos 

Studios available for small recitals and 2-piano practice 

Apply to Studio secretary for information between 11 and i 

63 WASHINGTON ST., PROVIDENCE, R. I. MA 2318 



rt4] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^^^^\^°^of^7.F^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos No. 2, 3, 4, 5. 6 

Suites No. 2 and 3. Prelude in E major 

Beethoven Symphonies Nos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis ; 

Overture to "Egmont" 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture, "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Nos. 3, 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz), Academic Festival Overture 

Copland "El Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring," "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" ( Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "La Mer," Sarahande 

Faur6 "Pelleas et Melisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last S]jring" 

Handel Larghetto ; Air from "Semele" (Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony No. 8 

Harris Symphony No. 8 

Haydn Symphonies No. 94 "Surprise" (new recording) ; 102 

(B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto ( Soloist : William Kapell ) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony No. 4, "Italian" (new recording) 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) ; E-flat (184) ; C major 

(338) ; Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofleff Classical Symphony (new recording) ; Violin Concerto 

No. 2 (Heifetz) ; "Lieutenant Kij6," Suite ; "Love for 
Three Oranges," Scherzo and March; "Peter and 
the Wolf"; "Romeo and Juliet," Suite; Symphony 
No. 5, Dance from "Chout" 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite No. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pa vane, Rapsodie Espagnole, Bolero 

Rimsky-KorsakOY "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinnshka 

Satie Gymnop4die No. 1 

Shostakovltch Symphony No. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) Symphony 

No. 5 ; "Rosamunde," Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony No. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Nos. 2 and 5 ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola"; "Maiden with Roses" 

Sousa "The Stars and Stripes Forever," "Semper Fidelis" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Strauss, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio ( SanromS ) : Song of the Volga Bargemen 

Tchaikovsky Symphonies Nos. 4, 5. 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade) ; Overture, "Romeo and Juliet"; Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thompson "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Grosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 



. ) 



'%-^^J 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



.Q> 



,\' 



'iHlll 



miinuiu 



^ — 



vvVV^ 



H 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 
I 948- 1 949 

Alumnae Hall, Wcllesley College, Wellesley 



J 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



SCHEDULE OF CONCERTS, Season 1948-1949 



OCTOBER 

5 

8-9 

12 

15-16 

19 
22-23 

24 

26 

29-30 



Wellesley 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Providence 

Boston 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 



NOVEMBER 

2 Boston 

5-6 Boston 

9 New Haven 

10 New York 

1 1 Hunter College 

12 Brooklyn 

13 New York 
16 Providence 

19-20 Boston 

21 Boston 

23 Boston 

26-27 Boston 

30 Pittsburgh 



DECEMBER 



1 
2 

3 
5 
6 

7 

8 

10-11 

14 
17-18 

21 

22-23 
28 



Cleveland 

Cincinnati 

Chicago 

Milwaukee 

Ann Arbor 

Detroit 

Rochester 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 



31 -Jan. 1 Boston 



JANUARY 
2 

4 
7-8 
11 
12 
13 
14 
15 



Boston 
Boston 
Boston 
Springfield 
New York 
Washington 
Brooklyn 
Ne^v York 



(Fri.-Sat. I) 
(Tues, A) 
(Fri.-Sat. II) 

(0 

(Fri.-Sat. Ill) 
(Sun. a) 

(0 

(Fri.-Sat. IV) 



(Tues. B) 
(Fri.-Sat. V) 

(Wed. 1) 

(1) 
(Sat. 1) 

(2) 

(Fri.-Sat. VI) 
(Sun. b) 
(Tues. C) 
(Fri.-Sat. VII) 



(Fri.-Sat. VIII) 

(2) 

(Fri.-Sat. IX) 
(Tues. D) 
(Fri.-Sat. X) 
(Pension Fund) 
(Fri.-Sat. XI) 



(Sun. c) 
(Tues. E) 
(Fri.-Sat. XII) 



(Wed. 2) 

(2) 
(Sat. 2) 



21-22 
23 
25 

28-29 



Cambridge 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 



FEBRUARY 



1 

4-5 

8 

11-12 

16 

17 

18 

19 

22 

25-26 

27 

MARCH 

1 

4-5 
8 

11-12 
14 
15 
16 

17 
18 

19 
22 
25-26 
27 
29 

APRIL 

1-2 

5 
8-9 

12 
13 
14 
15 
16 

19 
22-23 

24 

26 

29-30 



Providence 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

New York 

Newark 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 



Providence 

Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Hartford 

New Haven 

New York 

Newark 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Providence 



Boston 

Cambridge 

Boston 

Philadelphia 

New York 

New Brunsw ick 

Brooklyn 

New York 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 

Boston 



(3) 

^Fri.-Sat. XIII) 

fSun. d) 

(Tues. F) 

(Fri.-Sat. XIV) 



(3) 

(Fri.-Sat. XV) 

(4) 

(Fri.-Sat. XVI) 

(Wed. 3) 

(0 

(3) 

(Sat. 3) 
(Tues. G) 
(Fri.-Sat. XVII) 
(Sun. e) 



(4) 

(Fri.-Sat. XVIII) 

(5) 

(Fri.-Sat. XIX) 

(2) 
(Wed. 4) 

(2) 
(4) 

(Sat. 4) 
(Tues. H) 
(Fri.-Sat. XX) 
(Pension Fund) 

(5) 



(Fri.-Sat. XXI) 

(6) 

(Fri.-Sat. XXII) 

(Wed. 5) 

(.5) 

(Sat. 5) 
(Tues. I) 
(Fri.-Sat.XXIII) 
(Sun. f) 
(Spec, concert) 
(Fri.-Sat. XXIV) 



( 









SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Bt^rgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin 

TUESDAY EVENING, October 5 

with historical and descriptive notes by 

John N. Burk 



The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Henry B. Sawyer . Vice-President 

Richard C. Paine . Treasurer 

Philip R. Allen M. A. De Wolfe Howe 

John Nicholas Brown Jacob J. Kaplan 

Alvan T. Fuller Roger I. Lee 

Jerome D. Greene Lewis Perry 

N. Penrose Hallowell Raymond S. Wilkins 

Francis W. Hatch Oliver W^olcott 



George E. Judd, Manager 



['] 



^EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EMPLOYERS' Liability Auurance Corporation Ltd. 
The EMPLOYERS' Fire Insurance Company 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS' Inturance Company 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flames when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are firetraps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . .and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes and jobs. 

Sincerely, 

Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 
THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



« 



[2] 



Alumnae Hall, Wellesley College^ Welleslcy 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



TUESDAY EVENING, October 5, at 8:00 o'clock 



Program 

Brahms Academic Festival Overture, Op. 80 



Debussy 'Trelude a I'apres-midi d'un Faune" 

(Eclogue by Stephane Mallarme) 



Ravel "Daphnis et Chloe," Ballet (Second Suite) 

Lever du jour — Pantomime — Danse generale 

I N T E R ^r I S S I O X 

Beethoven Symphony No. 3 in E-flat major, 

"Eroica," Op. 55 
I. Allegro con brio 
II. Marcia funebre: Adagio assai 

III. Scherzo: Allegro vivace; Trio 

IV. Finale: Allegro molto 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 



[31 



live 
again 
these 
moments . . . 

realistically reproduced 
with the 




AT YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 
FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fideiitone Master 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 



PERMO 



Incorpindfed 

Chicago 26 



VALEDICTORY 

» » An ancient and distinguished 
orchestra has taken on new lustre 
and fame under the leadership of 
Dr. Serge Koussevitzky. For almost 
25 years he has given, in the words 
of Harry Cabot, speaking for the 
trustees, ''the most brilliant lead- 
ership and the most devoted serv- 
ice which the orchestra has ever 
enjoyed from anybody." 

We knew that Dr. Koussevit- 
zky's resignation would come some 
time, but we have put off think- 
ing of it as a thirig that might be 
wished away in the same- fashion 
we have begrudged the ending of 
a particularly luminous concert. 
More than anybody else in the 
list of distinguished conductors, 
he has fulfilled Colonel Higgin- 
son's specification of a "permanent 
orchestra under a permanent con- 
ductor." 

In the past quarter of a century, 
he has guided an orchestra which 
had emerged from a series of crises 
to new and golden heights of dis- 
tinction and beauty, recasting, 
reshaping, retraining until the 
merger of leader and men into a 
unified whole has made the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra rare and 
unique — a possession of incom- 
putable value — in the world. 

— From an editorial in the Providence 
Journal, April 11, 1948 



[4] 



ACADEMIC FESTIVAL OVERTURE, Op. 80 
By Johannes Brahms 

Born at Hamburg, May 7, 1833; died at Vienna, April 3, 1897 



The overture was composed in 1880; first performed January 4, 1881, at the 
University of Breslau. 

The orchestration: two flutes and piccolo, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons 
and contra-bassoon, four horns, three trumpets, three trombones, tuba, bass drum, 
timpani, cymbals, triangle and strings. 

Brahms' two overtures, the Akademische Fest-Ouvertilre and the 
Tragische Ouvertilre were composed in one summer — in 1880 
at Bad Ischl. It was his first summer in this particular resort, and al- 
though he was somewhat discouraged by an abundance of rainy 
w^eather, its charms drew him again in later years (1889-96) . "I must 
give high praise to Ischl," he wrote to Billroth in June, 1880, "and 
although I am threatened only with one thing — the fact that half 
Vienna is here — I can be quiet here —and on the whole I do not 
dislike it." Which is to say that Ischl had already become the gather- 
ing point of a constant round of cronies from Vienna. Brahms' friends 
of course would scrupulously respect the solitudes of the master's 
mornings — the creative hours spent, partly in country walks, partly 
in his study. Later in the day he would w^elcome the relaxation of 
companionship — of conversation to an accompaniment of black cigars 
and coffee, of mountaineering (Brahms w^as a sturdy walker) , or of 
music-making together. 

When the University at Breslau conferred upon Brahms, in the 
spring of 1879, the degree of Doctor of Philosophy, the composer re- 
sponded in kind, and made the institution the handsome present of 
an overture on student airs. Presents of this sort are not to be unduly 
hastened when artistic good faith and the heritage of the musical 
world are considered. Brahms composed and destroyed another 
"Academic" overture before this one, if Heuberger is not mistaken. 
The performance came the following January, when Brahms con- 
ducted it at Breslau, while the Herr Rektor and members of the 
philosophical faculty sat in serried ranks, persumably gowned, in 
the front rows. 

It goes without saying that both Brahms and his overture were 
quite innocent of such "academic" formality. It is about a tavern 
table, the faculty forgotten, that music enters spontaneously into 
German college life. Although Brahms never attended a university he 
has tasted something of this life at Gottingen when, as a younger man, 
he visited with Joachim, who w^as studying at the University. Brahms 
did not forget the melodv that filled the Kneipe, inspired by good 



company and good beer. Student songs, with their Volkslied flavor, 
inevitably interested him. He found use for four of them. Wir hatten 
gebauet ein stdttliches Hans is first given out by the trumpets. Der 
Landesvater (Hort, ich siiig' das Lied der Lieder) is used rhyth- 
mically, delightfully developed. The Fuchslied or Freshman's Song 
(Was kommt dort von der Hdli') is the choice of the unbuttoned 
Brahms, and leaves all educational solemnities behind. The air is in- 
troduced by two bassoons. When Brahms wrote Kalbeck that he had 
composed "a very jolly potpourri on students' songs a la Suppe," Kal- 
beck inquired jokingly whether he had used 'the "Fox song." "Oh, 
yes," said Brahms complacently. Kalbeck, taken aback, protested that 
he could not imagine any such tune used in homage to the "leathery 
Herr Rektor," and Brahms answered: "That is wholly unnecessary." 
Brahmsian horseplay does not get quite out of hand, and the dignities 
are saved beyond doubt when the full orchestra finally intones the 
hearty college hymn, Gaudeamiis Igitur. 

[copyrighted] 



PRELUDE TO "THE AFTERNOON OF A FAUN" (After the 
Eclogue of Stephane Mallarme) 

By Claude Debussy 

Born at St. Germain (Seine and Oise), August 22, 1862; died at Paris, 

March 26, 1918 



Del3ussy completed his Prelude to the Afternoon of a Faun in the' summer of 
1894. The Prelude was performed at the concerts of the Soci6t6 Nationale, December 
22, 1894, Gustave Doret conducting. It was published in 1895. 

The orchestration is as follows: three flutes, two oboes and English horn, two 
clarinets, two bassoons, four horns, two harps, antique cymbals, and strings. 

The first performance in the United States was by the Boston Orchestral Club. 
Georges Longy, conductor, April 1, 1902. The first performance by the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra was December 30, 1904. The Prelude did not find its way 
into the concerts of the Paris Conservatoire until the end of 1913. 

IT would require a poet of great skill and still greater assurance to at- 
tempt a translation of Mallarme's rhymed couplets, his complex 
of suggestions, his "labyrinth," as he himself called it, "ornamented 



NEW ENGLAND CONSERVATORY OF MUSIC 

Harrison Keller, Director , Malcolm H. Holmes, 3ean 

MUSIC RESEARCH LABORATORY by NICOLAS SLONIMSKY 

A weekly seminar for two hours Monday afternoons at 4 p.m. The purpose 
is to quicken music appreciation and to recognize and label various musical 
phenomena; also to examine musical problems of today, modern composi- 
tion, musical lexicography, and national music in all countries. 
For further information, apply to the Dean. 
290 Huntington Avenue, Boston, Mass. 

[6] 



by flowers." Arthur Symons (in his Tlie Symbolist Movement in 
Modern Literature) wrote: "The verse could not, I think, be trans- 
lated," and this plain dictum may be considered to stand. We shall 
therefore quote the faithful synopsis (quite unsuperseded) which 
Edmund Gosse made in his "Questions at Issue": 

"It appears in the florilege which he has just published, and I 
have now read it again, as I have often read it before. To say that 
I understand it bit by bit, phrase by phrase, would be excessive. 
But, if I am asked whether this famous miracle of unintelligibility 
gives me pleasure, I answer, cordially. Yes. I even fancy that I ob- 
tain from it as definite and as solid an impression as M. Mallarme 
desires to produce. This is w^hat I read in it. A faun — a simple, 
sensuous, passionate being — wakens in the forest at daybreak and 
tries to recall his experience of the previous afternoon. Was he the 
fortunate recipient of an actual visit from nymphs, -^vhite and golden 
goddesses, divinely tender and indulgent? Or is the memory he 
seems to retain nothing but the shadow of a vision, no more sub- 
stantial than the 'arid rain' of notes from his own flute? He cannot 
tell. Yet surely there was, surely there is, an animal whiteness 
among the brown reeds of the lake that shines out yonder. Were 
they, are they, swans? No! But Naiads plunging? Perhaps! Vaguer 
and vaguer grows that impression of this delicious experience. He 
would resign his woodland godship to retain it. A garden of lilies, 
golden-headed, white-stalked, behind the trellis of red roses? Ah! the 
effort is too great for his poor brain. Perhaps if he selects one lily 
from the garth of lilies, one benign and beneficent yielder of her 
cup to thirsty lips, the memory, the ever-receding memory may be 
forced back. So when he has glutted upon a bunch of grapes, he 
is wont to toss the empty skins in the air and blow them out in a 
visionary greediness. But no, the delicious hour grows vaguer; ex- 
perience or dream, he will never know which it was. The sun is 
warm, the grasses yielding; and he curls himself up again, after 
worshipping the efficacious star of wine, that he may pursue the 
dubious ecstasy into the more hopeful boskages of sleep. 

"This, then, is what I read in the so excessively obscure and un- 
intelligible L'Apres-Midi d'un Faiine; and, accompanied as it is 
with a perfect suavity of language and melody of rhythm, I know 
not what more a poem of eight pages could be expected to give. It 
supplies a simple and direct impression of physical beauty, of har- 
mony, of color; it is exceedingly mellifluous, when once the ear un- 
derstands that the poet, instead of being the slave of the Alexandrine, 
weaves his variations round it, like a musical composer." 

According to a line attributed to Debussy, the Prelude evokes "the 
successive scenes of the Faun's desires and dreams on that hot 
afternoon." 

[copyrighted] 



[7] 




Recording exclusively for RCA Victor, he brings you 

c wealth of his greatest performances for encore after encore! 

Among them: 

• Symphony No. 9, in D Minor — Beethoven. With Frances Yeend, soprano, 
Eunice Alberts, contralto; David Lloyd, tenor; James Pease, bass; 

the Berkshire Music Festival Chorus, Robert Shaw directing, and the 
Boston Symphony Orchestra. Album DM-n90, $11; DV-12 (RCA Victor 
'Red Seal' De Luxe Records), $17. 

• Francesco do Rimini, Op. 32 — Tchaikovsky. The Boston Symphony 

Orchestra. Album DM-1179, $4.75. 

• Symphony No. 5, in B-Flat — Schubert. The Boston Symphony Orchestra. 
Album DM-1215, $4.75. 

Prices include Federal excise tax end are subject to change without notice. 
("'DM" and '"DV" albums also available in manual sequence, $1 extra.) 




The newest Crestwood is everything you've wanted in a 
radio-phonograph! Record changer and radio in one roll-out 
unit. Rich tone of the ''Golden Throat." AM, short wave, 
FM radio. Plays up to 12 records automatically. 
"Silent Sapphire" permanent pick-up. AC. Victroic 61fiV4. 
("Victrola"— T.M. Reg. U.S. Pat. OFF.) 



THE WORLD'S GREATEST ARTISTS ARE 



A>^ 



[«] 





^^ 



HAVE YOU HEARD THE RCAVICTOI $HOwr 
SUNDAY AFTERNOONS OVER NIC 



r9i 



DAPHNIS ET CHLOE - Ballet in One Act - Orchestral 

Fragments 
Second Series: "Daybreak," "Pantomime," "General Dance" 

By Maurice Ravel 
Born at Ciboure, Basses-Pyr^n^es, March 7, 1875; died in Paris, December 28, 1937 



The ballet Daphnis et Chloe was completed in 1912*, and first produced June 8, 
1912 by Diaghileff's Ballet Russe, at the Chdtelet in Paris, Pierre Monteux conduct- 
ing. Of the two orchestral suites drawn from the ballet, the second had its first 
performance at the concerts of the Boston Symphony Orchestra, December 14, 1917 
(Dr. Karl Muck conducting). 

The Second Suite is scored for two flutes, bass flute and piccolo, two oboes 
and English horn, two clarinets in B-flat, clarinet in E-flat and bass clarinet, three 
bassoons and contra-bassoon, four horns, four trumpets, three trombones and tuba, 
timpani, bass drum, two side drums, cymbals, triangle, tambourine, castanets, 
celesta, glockenspiel, two harps and strings. A wordless mixed chorus is written 
in the score, but is optional and can be replaced by instruments. 

IN HIS autobiographical sketch of 1928, Ravel described his Daphnis 
et Chloe as "a choreographic symphony in three parts, commis- 
sioned from me by the director of the company of the Ballet Russe: 
M. Serge de Diaghileff. The plot was by Michel Fokine, at that time 
choreographer of the celebrated troupe. My intention in writing it was 
to compose a vast musical fresco, less scrupulous as to archaism than 
faithful to the Greece of my dreams, which inclined readily enough 
to what French artists of the late eighteenth century have imagined 
and depicted. 

"The work is constructed symphonically according to a strict tonal 
plan by the method of a few motifs, the development of which achieves 
a symphonic homogeneity of style. 

"Sketched in 1907, Daphnis was several times subjected to revision 
—notably the finale." 

The story comes from a document of ancient Greece, and is at- 
tributed to a sophist, Longus, who lived in the second or third cen- 
tury A.D. It is the oldest of countless tales of the love, tribulation and 
final union of a shepherd and shepherdess. The first version of 
Daphnis and Chloe to appear in print was a French translation by 
Amyot, which was printed in 1559. The first English translation was 
made by Angell Dave, printed in 1587. A translation by George Thorn- 
ley (1657) is in current print. Thornley in a preface "to the criticall 
reader," commends the author as "a most sweet and pleasant writer," 
and calls the tale "a Perpetual Oblation to Love; An Everlasting Ana- 
thema, Sacred to Pan, and the Nymphs; and, A Delightful Possession 
even for all." 



• This according to Serge Lifar, who was a dancer in the Ballet Russe at that time and 
who states that Daphnis et Chloe was not put on in 1911, "because Ravel was not yet 
ready. At last, in 1912 he sent the orchestral score to Diaghileff." — "La Revue Mustcale, 
December. 1938. 

[copyrighted] 

[,o] 



SYMPHONY NO. 3 in E-FLAT, "EROICA," Op. 55 

By LuDwiG VAN Beethoven 

Born at Bonn, December i6(?), 1770; died at Vienna, March 26, 1827 



Composed in the years 1802-1804, the Third Symphony was first performed at 
a private concert in the house of Prince von Lobkowitz in Vienna, December, 1804, 
the composer conducting. The first public performance was at the Theater an der 
Wien, April 7, iSo^. The parts were published in 1806, and dedicated to Prince 
von Lobkowitz. The score was published in 1820. 

The symphony is scored for two flutes, two oboes, two clarinets, two bassoons, 
three horns, two trumpets, timpani and strings. 

THOSE who have listened to the Eroica Symphony have been re- 
minded, perhaps too often, that the composer once destroyed in 
anger a dedication to Napoleon Bonaparte. The music, as one returns 
to it in the course of succeeding years, seems to look beyond Napoleon, 
as if it really never had anything to do with the man who once fell 
short of receiving a dedication. Sir George Grove once wrote: "Though 
the Eroica was a portrait of Bonaparte, it is as much a portrait of 
Beethoven himself — but that is the case with everything he wrote." 
Sir George's second remark was prophetic of the present point of view. 
His first statement represented an assumption generally held a half 
century ago, but now more seldom encountered. 

The concept of heroism which plainly shaped this symphony, and 
which sounds through so much of Beethoven's music, would give no 
place to a self-styled "Emperor" who was ambitious to bring all 
Europe into vassalage, and ready to crush out countless lives in order 
to satisfy his ambition. If the "Eroica" had ever come to Napoleon's 
attention, which it probably did not, its inward nature would have 
been quite above his comprehension — not to speak, of course, of 
musical comprehension. Its suggestion is of selfless heroes, those who 

WADSWORTH PROVANDIE 

TEACHER OF SINGING 

Symphony Chambers 

246 Huntington Avenue Boston, Massachusetts 

Accredited in the art of singing by Jean de Reszke, Paris, and in 
mise en scene by Roberto Villani, Milan 

Studio : Kenmore 6-9495 Residence : Maiden 2-6190 



JULES WOLFFERS 

PIANIST - TEACHER 

Boston University College of Music 

25 Blagden Street, Boston, Massachusetts 

[11] 



give their lives to overthrow tyrants and liberate oppressed peoples. 
Egmont was such a hero, and so was Leonore. The motive that gave 
musical birth to those two characters also animated most of Beethoven's 
music, varying in intensity, but never in kind. It grew from the 
thoughts and ideals that had nurtured the French Revolution. 

Beethoven was never more completely, more eruptively revolution- 
ary than in his Eroica Symphony. Its first movement came from all 
that was defiant in his nature. He now tasted to the full the intoxica- 
tion of artistic freedom. This hunger for freedom was one of his 
deepest impulses, and it was piqued by his sense of servitude to titles. 
Just or not, the resentment was real to him, and it increased his kin- 
ship with the commoner, and his ardent republicanism. The Eroica, 
of course, is no political document, except in the degree that it was 
the deep and inclusive expression of the composer's point of view at 
the time. And there was much on his heart. This was the first out- 
spoken declaration of independence by an artist who had outgrown 
the mincing restrictions of a salon culture in the century just ended. 
But, more than that, it was a reassertion of will power. The artist, 
first confronted with the downright threat of total deafness, answered 
by an unprecedented outpouring of his creative faculties. There, es- 
pecially, lie the struggle, the domination, the suffering, and the triumph 
of the Eroica Symphony. The heroism that possesses the first movement 
is intrepidity where faith and strength become one, a strength which 
exalts and purifies. The funeral march, filled with hushed mystery, has 
no odor of mortality; death had no place in Beethoven's thoughts as 
artist. The spirit which gathers and rises in the middle portion sweeps 
inaction aside and becomes a life assertion. The shouting triumph 
of the variation Finale has no tramp of heavy, crushing feet; it is a 
jubilant exhortation to all mankind, a foreshadowing of the Finales 



For Discriminating Theatre Goers 

^Boston Tributary Theatres 

Repertory Productions 

(A Friday and Saturday Evening Series) 

Oct. 8-9, "The Shoemaker's Holiday"; Oct. 15-16, ''Ghosts"; Oct. 22-23, 

"Anna Christie" ; Oct. 29-30, "The Playboy of the Western World." 

Productions staged and lighted by ELIOT DUVEY 
Settings designed by MATT HORNER 

The Children's Theatre SERIES — Saturday Afternoons at 2:30 

Adele Thane, Director 

Oct. 2 — "Robin Hood"; Oct. 16 — "The Emperor's New Clothes" 
Also Coming: "Tom Sawyer," "The Little Princess," "A Christmas Carol." 

Ticket Prices: 60c, 90c, $1.20, $1.80 (Tax Incl.) Tel. Res. — COpley 7-0377 

Season Subscription Books: $4, $6, $8, $12 

All Performances at New England Mutual Hall 

[12] 



of the Fifth and Ninth Symphonies. It is entirely incongruous as ap- 
plied to the vain and preening Corsican and his bloody exploits. 
Beethoven may once have had some misty idea of a noble liberator; he 
was to have an increasingly bitter experience of the misery which spread 
in Napoleon's wake. 

The Third Symphony is set down by Paul Henry Lang, in his 
Music in Western Civilization, as "one of the incomprehensible 
deeds in arts and letters, the greatest single step made by an individual 
composer in the history of the symphony and the history of music in 
general." The statement is well considered; it looms in a summation 
which is broad, scholarly, and musically penetrating. Indeed, wonder- 
ment at that mighty project of the imagination and will is not lessened 
by the passing years. Contemplating the harmless docilities of the 
First and Second Symphonies, one looks in vain for a "new road"* 
taken so readily with so sure and great a stride. M^agner's Ring fol- 
lowing Lohengrin, Brahms' First Symphony — these triumphant as- 
sertions of will power were achieved only after years of germination 
and accumulated force. With Beethoven, spiritual transformations 



* "I am not satisfied," said Beethoven to Ej-umpholz in 1802, "with my works up to the 
present time. From today I mean to take a new road." (This on the authority of Czerny — 
"Recollection of Beethoven.") 



1948 WELLESLEY CONCERT SERIES 1949 

Da\^d Barnett, Manager 

ALUMNAE HALL, WELLESLEY COLLEGE 

OCT. 5 — BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, 

DR. SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor 

NOV. 17 — ERNST VON DOHNANYI, Pianist 

MAR. 2 — BURL IVES, Ballad Singer 

APR. 28 — WILLIAM PRIMROSE, Violist 



Subscriptions: $6.00, $8.40, $9.60. Concert Office, Billings 
Hall, Wellesley College, open Monday through Friday, 
10 :30-12 :30, 1 :30-3 :30. Tel. WE 5-0320. 



[^3] 



often came swiftly and without warning. Having completed his Second 
Symphony in the summer of 1802 at Heiligenstadt, he forthwith 
turned his back upon the polite patterns of Haydn and Mozart. 

The moment was the most critical in his life. The realization came 
upon him in that summer that deafness must be accepted, an ironic 
blotting out of the precious faculty of his calling, shutting him from 
converse with the world of tone and the world of men. He contem- 
plated suicide, but seized upon the thought that living to compose 
was his one great duty and resource. To Dr. Wegeler, one of the two 
friends whom he could bring himself to tell of his deafness, he wrote 
in a letter of resurgent determination, "I will take Fate by the throat." 
The "Eroica" was his direct act of taking "Fate by the throat," for 
the first sketches are attributed by Nottebohm to October, 1802, the 
very month of the Heiligenstadt Will. In this sense, the idealized 
heroism of the Symphony can be nothing else than autobiographical. 
It is not explicitly so, for Beethoven would not reveal his secret 
tragedy; not even consciously so, for the deeper motivations of Bee- 
thoven were quite instinctive. 

As his notebooks show, he forged his heroic score with a steady on- 
slaught, expanding the inherited form almost beyond recognition, yet 
preserving its balance and symmetry. The plans for each movement 
but the scherzo were laid in the first fever of creation. But Beethoven 
seems to have been in no great hurry to complete his task. The work- 
manship in detail is largely attributed to his summer sojourns of 1803 
at Baden and at Ober-Dobling. Ries remembered seeing the fair copy 
in its finished state upon the composer's table in the early spring 
of 1804. 

Musicians have never ceased to wonder at the welded and significant 
organism of the exposition in the first movement, the outpouring in- 
vention and wealth of episodes in the working out, the magnificence 
and freshness of the coda. The unity of purpose, the clarity amid pro- 
fusion, which the Symphony's early critics failed to perceive, extends 
no less to the Funeral march, the scherzo, the variation finale — forms 
then all quite apart from symphonic practice. One whose creative 
forces ran in this wise could well ignore precedent, and extend his 
score to the unheard-of length of three quarters of an hour. * 

The immense step from the Second Symphony to the Third is 
primarily an act of the imagination. The composer did not base his 



• Beethoven is said to have retorted to those who vigorously protested the length of the 
Eroica : "If I write a symphony an hour long, it will be found short enough !" And so he 
did, with his Ninth. He must have realized, however, the incapacity of contemporary audi- 
ences, when he affixed to the published parts (and later to the score) of the "Eroica": 
"Since this symphony is longer than an ordinary symphony, it should be performed at the 
beginning rather than at the end of a concert, either after an overture or an aria, or after a 
concerto. If it be performed too late, there is the danger that it will not produce on the 
audience, whose attention will be already wearied by preceding pieces, the effect which the 
composer purposed in his own mind to attain." 

[14I 



new power on any new scheme; he kept the form of the salon sym- 
phony* whicli, as it stood, could have been quite incongruous to his 
every thouglit, and began furiously to expand and transform. The 
exposition is a mighty projection of 155 bars, music of concentrated 
force, wide in dynamic and emotional range, conceived apparently in 
one great sketch, w^here the pencil could hardly keep pace with the 
outpouring thoughts. There are no periodic tunes here, but fragments 
of massive chords, and sinuous rhythms, subtly articulated but inex- 
tricable, meaningless as such except in their context. Every bar bears 
the heroic stamp. There is no melody in the conventional sense, but 
in its o^vn sense the music is melody unbroken, in long ebb and flow, 
vital in every part. Even before the development is reached the com- 
poser has taken us through mountains and valleys, shown us the range, 
the universality of his subject. The development is still more incredible, 
as it extends the classical idea of a brief thematic interplay into a sec- 
tion of 250 bars. It discloses vaster scenery, in Tvhich the foregoing 
elements are newly revealed, in their turn generating others. The re- 
capitulation (beginning wdth the famous passage where the horns 
mysteriously sound the returning tonic E-flat against a lingering 
dominant chord) restates the themes in the increased strength and 
beauty of fully developed acquaintance. 

But still the story is not told. In an unprecedented coda of 140 bars, 
the much exploited theme and its satellites reappear in fresh guise, 
as if the artist's faculty of imaginative growth could never expend 
itself. This first of the long codas is one of the most astonishing parts 
of the Symphony. A coda until then had been little more than a bril- 
liant close, an underlined cadence. With Beethoven it ^vas a resolution 
in a deeper sense. The repetition of the subject matter in the reprise 
could not be for him the final word. The movement had been a narra- 
tive of restless action — forcefulness gathering, striding to its peak and 
breaking, followed by a gentler lyricism which in turn gre^v in tension 
until the cycle was repeated. The movement required at last an es- 
tablished point of repose. The coda sings the theme softly, in confident 
reverie under a new^ and delicate violin figure. As the coda takes its 
quiet course, the theme and its retinue of episodes are transfigured 
into tone poetry whence conflict is banished. The main theme, ringing 
and joyous, heard as never before, brings the end. 

The second movement, like the first, is one of conflicting impulses, 
but here assuaging melody contends, not -^vith overriding energy, but 



* He first projected the movements conventionally, as the sketchbooks show. The opening 
chords of the first movement, stark and arresting, were originally sketched as a merely stiff 
dominant-tonic cadence. The third movement first went upon paper as a minuet. Variations 
were then popular, and so were funeral m.arches, although they were not used in symphonies. 



CONSTANTIN HOUNTASIS 

VIOLIXS 

MAKER AND REPAIRER. OUTFITS AND ACCESSORIES 

240 HUNTINGTON AVENUE 

Opposite Symphony Hall . KEnmore 6-9285 



[li 



with the broken accents of heavy sorrow. The legato second strain in 
the major eases the muffled minor and the clipped notes of the open- 
ing "march" theme, to which the oboe has lent a special somber shad- 
ing. The middle section, in C major, begins with a calmer, elegiac 
melody, over animating staccato triplets from the strings. The triplets 
become more insistent, ceasing only momentarily for broad fateful 
chords, and at last permeating the scene with their determined rhythm, 
as if the composer were setting his indomitable strength against tragedy 
itself. The opening section returns as the subdued theme of grief gives 
its dark answer to the display of defiance. But it does not long continue. 
A new melody is heard in a fugato of the strings, an episode of quiet, 
steady assertion, characteristic of the resolution Beethoven found in 
counterpoint. The whole orchestra joins to drive the point home. But 
a tragic decrescendo and a reminiscence of the funeral first theme is 
again the answer. Now Beethoven thunders his protest in mighty 
chords over a stormy accompaniment. There is a long subsidence — a 
magnificent yielding this time — and a return of the first theme again, 
now set forth in full voice. As in the first movement, (there is still lack- 
ing the final answer, and that answer comes in another pianissimo coda, 
measures where peacefulness is found and sorrow accepted, as the 
theme, broken into incoherent fragments, comes to its last concord. 

The conquering life resurgence comes, not shatteringly, but in a 
breath-taking pianissimo, in the swiftest, most wondrous Scherzo Bee- 
thoven had composed. No contrast more complete could be imagined. 
The Scherzo is another exhibition of strength, but this time it is 
strength finely controlled, unyielding and undisputed. In the Trio, the 
horns, maintaining the heroic key of E-flat, deliver the principal phrases 
alone, in three-part harmony. The Scherzo returns with changes, such 
as the repetition of the famous descending passage of rhythmic dis- 
placement in unexpected duple time instead of syncopation. If this 
passage is "humorous," humor must be defined as the adroit and fanci- 
ful play of power. 

And now in the Finale, the tumults of exultant strength are released. 
A dazzling flourish, and the bass of the theme is set forward simply 
by the plucked strings. It is repeated, its bareness somewhat adorned 
before the theme proper appears over it, by way of the wood winds.* 
The variations disclose a fugato, and later a new theme, a sort of 
"second subject" in conventional martial rhythm but an inspiriting 
stroke of genius in itself. The fugato returns in more elaboration, in 
which the bass is inverted. The music takes a graver, more lyric pace 
for the last variation, a long poco andante. The theme at this tempo 
has a very different expressive beauty. There grows from it a new 
alternate theme (first given to the oboe and violin) . The principal 
theme now strides majestically across the scene over triplets of increas- 
ing excitement which recall the slow movement. There is a gradual 
dying away in which the splendor of the theme, itself unheard, still 
lingers. A presto brings a gleaming close. 



* The varied theme had already appeared under Beethoven's name as the finale of 
"Prometheus," as a contra-dance, and as a set of piano variations. Was this fourth use of 
it the persistent exploitation of a particularly workable tune, or the orchestral realization 
for which the earlier uses were as sketches ? The truth may lie between. 

[copyrighted] 

[16] 



VICTOR RED SEAL RECORDS 

Boston Symphony Orchestra ^'^^^\^2'if^7o}'^'^^^ 

Bach, C. P. E Concerto for Orchestra in D major 

Bach, J. S Brandenburg Concertos Xos. 2, 3, 4, and 5 

Suite Xos. 2 and 3 

Beethoven Symphonies Xos. 2, 3, 8, and 9 ; Missa Solemnis 

Berlioz Symphony, "Harold in Italy" (Primrose) 

Three Pieces, "Damnation of Faust," Overture. "The 
Roman Carnival" 

Brahms Symphonies Xos. 3. 4 

Violin Concerto (Heifetz) 

Copland "El Salon Mexico," "Appalachian Spring." "A Lin- 
coln Portrait" (Speaker: Melvyn Douglas) 

Debussy "The Afternoon of a Faun" 

"La Mer," Sarabande 

Faure "Pelleas et Molisande," Suite 

Foote Suite for Strings 

Grieg "The Last Spring" 

Handel Larghetto (Concerto X'^o. 12), Air from "Semele" 

(Dorothy Maynor) 

Hanson Symphony Xo. 3 

Harris Symphony Xo. 3 

Haydn Symphonies X^os. 94 ("Surprise") : 102 (B-flat) 

Khatchatourian Piano Concerto (Soloist : William Kapell) 

Liadov "The Enchanted Lake" 

Liszt Mephisto Waltz 

Mendelssohn Symphony Xo. 4 ("Italian") 

Moussorgsky "Pictures at an Exhibition" 

Prelude to "Khovanstchina" 

Mozart Symphonies in A major (201) : E-flat (184) : C major 

(388) : Air of Pamina, from "The Magic Flute" 
(Dorothy Maynor) 

Piston Prelude and Allegro for Organ and Strings (E. Power 

Biggs) 

Prokofieff Classical Symphony : Violin Concerto X'o. 2 (Heifetz) : 

"Lieutenant Kije." Suite : "Love for Three Oranges." 
Scherzo and ^larch : "Peter and the Wolf" ; "Romeo 
and Juliet." Suite : Symphony Xo. 5 

Rachmaninoff "Isle of the Dead" : "Vocalise" 

Ravel "Daphnis and Chloe," Suite Xo. 2 (new recording) ; 

Pa vane 

Rimsky-Korsakov "The Battle of Kerjenetz" ; Dubinushka 

Shostakovitch Sym])hony Xo. 9 

Schubert "Unfinished" Symphony (new recording) ; "Rosa- 

munde." Ballet Music 

Schumann Symphony X'o. 1 ("Spring") 

Sibelius Symphonies Xos. 2 and o ; "Pohjola's Daughter" ; 

"Tapiola" : "Maiden with Roses" 

Strauss, J Waltzes : "Voices of Spring," "Vienna Blood" 

Straus.s, R "Also Sprach Zarathustra" 

"Till Eulenspiegel's Merry Pranks" 

Stravinsky Capriccio (Sanroma) ; Song of the Volga Bargemen 

(arrangement) 

Tchaikovsky Symi)honies Xos. 4, 5. 6; Waltz (from String 

Serenade): Overture, "Romeo and Juliet": Fan- 
tasia, "Francesca da Rimini" 

Thomp.son "The Testament of Freedom" 

Vivaldi Concerto Crosso in D minor 

Wagner Prelude and Good Friday Spell from "Parsifal" 

Weber Overture to "Oberon" 



oci/r(^ 




^0(0^ 



d^ 



by richness of tone^ 
effortless action^ 
responsiveness. 



ISaliwin 



THE CHOICE OF GREAT CONDUCTOR 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY 

Serge Koussevitzky — Boston Symphony^ 
Baldwin . . . what a trio in the musical cul- 
ture of America! His preference for Baldwin 
is praise indeed: "A great work of musical art 
... a truly orchestral tone, round, full and of 
magnificent resonance and color! . . . For the 
orchestra, as well as tor my own use, the 
Baldwin is PERFECTION." 

We have set aside a Baldwin for you to try. 
Come in and hear it! 



BALDWIN ALSO BUILDS ACROSONIC, HAMILTON AND HOWARD PIANOS 

THE BALDWIN PIANO COMPANY 

160 BOYLSTON STREET BOSTON, MASSACHUSETTS 

Eastern Headquarters: — 20 EAST 54TH STREET. NEW YORK CITY 




WODLSSY HALL IIW HA?M 

Auspices Tal© Unirersity 
School of Muslo 

Tuesday IJreniri^, Hovsmbar 9» 
at 8O0 

BOSTOS" SIMPHOro OHCHSSTHA 
Serge Scmssevitzl^, Music Director 

PEDGHAHKS 

VlTaldi Concerto in B minor 

for Orchestra 
le Maestoso 

11^ Largo 

IIIo Allegro 

Brabma* Variations on a Them© 

by Haydn 

Strauss UTill Stiienspiegel^s Merry 

Pranks" 

Beethoven. Symphony Ho© 7 in A major 

Ic Poco aoetonuto; Yivaco 

II. Allegretto 

III. Presto; Aesai meno presto; Tempo prlmo 

IV^ Allegro con brio 







Ili^fEi^s-PRESIDI 



-1 



^\ 





V 



Concert ^ ^ 

5CRIPTIONi::Sll^lES 1P 

^t^ Sunder THf-^uspitEiS of j^he 

\^ 1^ ^ Apjl|ni^EDt>4^TlDN COA\MlfTEE ^D/ 

uTH[fr>^bXRD OF--HIGrtEi| ^^CATION ^^ T 





A R R A N GEM EN T S BY. D_R.__B E 



ARTISTS 

PARTICIPATING IN THE SUBSCRIPTION 
SERIES 1948-49 

i 1948: 

Saturday, October 30th 

ARTUR SCHNABEL 

and JOSEPH SZIGETI 

o 

Saturday, November 6th 

LILY PONS 

Thursday, November 11th 

BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA 
S. KOUSSEVITZKY, Conductor 

e 

Saturday, November 20th 
LUBOSHUTZ and NEMENOFF 

Saturday, December 11th 
EZIO PINZA 

1949: 
Saturday, January 8th 

MARIAN ANDERSON 

Saturday, January 29th 

NATHAN MILSTEIN 

Saturday, February 5th 

ARTUR SCHNABEL 

Saturday, February 1 9th 

ARTUR RUBINSTEIN 

Saturday, March 5th 

ERICA MORINI 

e 

Saturday, March 1 9th 
ALEXANDER BRAILOWSKY 

Saturday, April 9th 

iJASCHA HEIFETZ 



SIRIA MOSQPB 



PITTSBUHaH 



The Pittgl)\rrgh Orcheatra Aaeoclation 
pre sent 8 
BOSTON STMPHOSY ORCHESTBA 
Serg# Kouseevitzlgr, Music Director 

Tuesday t HoveiaTjer 30» at Qty) 

PROaHAMMB 

C.P^Et, Bach Concerto in D major for 

Stringed Xnstrusen'^s 
(Arrangod for Orchestra 'by M^Steinherg) 



Vaughan Williaas. ^.•^naphony Hoo 6 

I. Allegro 
II» Hoderato 
lU^. Scherzo; Allegro vivac© 
Vr^\, %ilogtLe 



(Played without pauee) 



IHTEPKISSIOH 



Beethoven Symphony Ho, 7 in A major 



4ii(i*l|i4r4t«*<t4i1ii»4rD>**4>^4i 






&U^ 



/'•■ -/ 



y) 



BOSTON 

SYMPHONY 

ORCHESTRA 



1^ 



%// 



FOUNDED IN I88I BY 
HENRY LEE HIGGINSON 



k 



7 



A, 



A^ 



"^Wi 



iiiiii/i 



M 



»/^' — 



V^VvJ 



H 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON 

1948- 1949 

Music Hall, Cleveland 
Wednesday Evening, December 1 

Under the Auspices of 
THE CLEVELAND ORCHESTRA 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

[Sixty-eighth Season, 1948-1949] 
SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 

RICHARD BURGIN, Associate Conductor 



Violins 

Richard Burgin, 
Concert-master 
Alfred Krips 

Gaston Elcus 
Rolland Tapley 

Norbert Lauga 
George Zazofsky 

Paul Cherkassky 
Harry Dubbs 

Vladimir ResnikofF 
Joseph Leibovici 

Einar Hansen 
Daniel Eisler 
Norman Carol 
Carlos P infield 
Paul Fedorovsky 
Harry Dickson 

Minot Beale 
Frank Zecchino 

Clarence Knudson 
Pierre Mayer 

Manuel Zung 
Samuel Diamond 
Victor Manusevitch 
James Nagy 
Leon Gorodetzky 
Raphael Del Sordo 

Melvin Bryant 
John Murray 
Lloyd Stonestreet 
Henri Erkelens 

Saverio Messina 
Herman Silberman 

Stanley Benson 
Sheldon Rotenberg 

Basses 

Georges Moleux 
Willis Page 

Ludwig Juht 
Irving Frankel 
Henry Greenberg 
Henry Portnoi 

Gaston Dufresne 
Henri Girard 

Henry Freeman 
John Barwicki 



PERSONNEL 

Violas 

Joseph de Pasquale 
Jean Cauhape 

Georges Fourel 
Eugen Lehner 

Albert Bernard 
Emil Kornsand 

George Humphrey 
Louis Arti^res 
Charles Van Wynbergen 
Hans Werner 

Jerome Lipson 
Siegfried Gerhardt 

Violoncellos 

Samuel Mayes 
Alfred Zighera 

Jacobus Langendoen 
Mischa Nieland 

Hippolyte Droeghmans 
Karl Zeise 
Josef Zimbler 
Bernard Parronchi 

Enrico Fabrizio 
Leon Marjollet 

Flutes 
Georges Laurent 
James Pappoutsakis 
Phillip Kaplan 

Piccolo 
George Madsen 

Oboes 
John Holmes 
Jean Devergie 
Joseph Lukatsky 

English Horn 
Louis Speyer 

Clarinets 

Manuel Valerio 
Attilio Poto 
Pasquale Cardillo 

E\) Clarinet 

Bass Clarinet 
Rosario Mazzeo 



Bassoons 

Raymond Allard 
Ernst Panenka 
Ralph Masters 

Contra-Bassoon 
Boaz Piller 

Horns 

Willem Valkenier 
James Stagliano 
Principals 

Harry Shapiro 
Harold Meek 
Paul Keaney 
Walter Macdonald 
Osbourne McConathy 

Trumpets 

Georges Mager 
Roger Voisin 
Principals 

Marcel Lafosse 
Harry Herforth 
Rene Voisin 

Trombones 
Jacob Raichman 
Lucien Hansotte 
John Coffey 
Josef Orosz 

Tuba 

Vinal Smith 

Harps 
Bernard Zighera 
Elford Caughey 

Timpani 
Roman Szulc 
Max Polster 

Percussion 
Simon Sternburg 
Charles Smith 
Emil Arcieri 

Piano 
Lukas Foss 

Librarian 
Leslie Rogers 



^^^f'y^ 



"MS^ 



^ 



i9^4\Vvi949 



SIXTY-EIGHTH SEASON, 1948-1949 

Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 
Richard Burgin, Associate Conductor 



Concert Bulletin 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, December 1 



with historical and descriptive notes by 
John N. Burk 



The trustees of the 
BOSTON SYMPHONY ORCHESTRA, Inc. 

Henry B. Cabot . President 

Jacob J. Kaplan . Vice-President 



Richard C. Paine 

Philip R. Allen 
John Nicholas Brown 
Alvan T. Fuller 
Jerome D. Greene 
N. Penrose Hallo well 
Francis W. Hatch 



Treasurer 

M. A. De Wolfe Howe 
Roger I. Lee 
Lewis Perry 
Henry B. Sawyer 
Raymond S. Wilkins 
Oliver Wolcott 



George E. Judd, Manager 



[1] 



EMPLOYERS' GROUP 

INSURANCE COMPANIES OF BOSTON 
-ONE LIBERTY SQUARE, BOSTON 7, MASSACHUSETTS 




The EHPU>YERS' UabUtty Attunutct Corpomtiem LuL 
The EMPLOYERS' Fira liuuranot Compatty 
AMERICAN EMPLOYERS' /wuraac* CompmMy 



Dear Friends: 

During the next twelve months over 10,000 lives and 
$690,000,000 in property will be wiped out by our common 
enemy . . . FIRE . 

I ask why ? Why do we sit back and watch the flzimes when 
something can be done? 

Just think of it . . . many, many persons die each year from 
smoking in bed. Why not fireproof bedding? 

Embers from fireplaces and smoldering cigarettes are every- 
day causes of fire. Why not fireproof rugs and upholstery? 

Statistics prove that fire kills more girls than boys. Why 
then, do we send our daughters to dances in dresses that 
are firetraps? 

Look at the new homes being built today "with every modern 
convenience." Why don't they have fire alarm systems ... as 
easily installed as a door bell? 

Why do some cities and towns consider an inferior fire 
department a relief to taxpayers when the cost of one bad 
fire would buy the most modern fire fighting equipment? 

Why, as a nation that can create an atom bomb, do we allow 
fire losses to grow steadily worse? 

My job is to sell insurance . . . and the more fires, the more 
people recognize the need for insurance. But I don't want to 
die in a fire. Nor do I want to see my or your family and 
home destroyed. That is why I urge every living American to 
start now and stop fires to save lives, homes' and jobs. 

Sincerely, 





7C/i 

Your local Employers' Group insurance agent. 

THE INSURANCE MAN SERVES AMERICA 



[«] 




The following will be added to the program after 
Honegger's Symphony for Strings: 



Satie 



Two "Gymnopedies" 
(Orchestrated by Debussy) 



» 



Music Hall, Cleveland 



Boston Symphony Orchestra 

SERGE KOUSSEVITZKY, Music Director 



WEDNESDAY EVENING, December i, at 8:30 o'clock 



Program 



HoNEGGER Symphony for Strings 

I. Molto moderato 
II. Adagio mesto 
III. Vivace, non troppo 

pROKOFiEFF Scythian Suite, "Ala and Lolli," Op. 20 

I. The Adoration of Veles and Ala 

II. The Enemy God and the Dance of the Black Spirits 

III. Night 

IV. The Glorious Departure of Lolli and the Procession of the Sun 

INTERMISSION 

Brahms Symphony No. 1 in C minor, Op. 68 

I. Un poco sostenuto; Allegro 

II. Andante sostenuto 

III. Un poco allegretto e grazioso 

IV. Adagio; Allegro non troppo, ma con brio 



BALDWIN PIANO VICTOR RECORDS 



[31 



live 
again 
these 
moments . . . 

realistically reproduced 
with the 




AT'YOUR DEALER'S— A FULL SELECTION OF 

FINE FIDELITONE NEEDLES 

Fidelitone Supreme $2.50 

Fidelitone Master 1 .50 

Nylon Fidelitone 1 .25 

Fidelitone Deluxe 1 .00 

Fidelitone Floating Point 50c 



PERMO Incorporated 



Chicago 76 



VALEDICTORY 

» » An ancient and distinguished 
orchestra has taken on new lustre 
and fame under the leadership of 
Dr. Serge Koussevitzky. For almost 
25 years he has given, in the words 
of Harry Cabot, speaking for the 
trustees, ''the most brilliant lead- 
ership and the most devoted serv- 
ice which the orchestra has ever 
enjoyed from anybody." 

We knew that Dr. Koussevit- 
zky's resignation would come some 
time, but we have put off think- 
ing of it as a thing that might be 
wished away in the same fashion 
we have begrudged the ending of 
a particularly luminous concert. 
More than anybody else in the 
list of distinguished conductors, 
he has fulfilled Colonel Higgin- 
son's specification of a ''permanent 
orchestra under a permanent con- 
ductor." 

In the past quarter of a century, 
he has guided an orchestra which 
had emerged from a series of crises 
to new and golden heights of dis- 
tinction and beauty, recasting, 
reshaping, retraining until the 
merger of leader and men into a 
unified whole has made the Boston 
Symphony Orchestra rare and 
unique — a possession of incom- 
putable value — in the world. 

— From an editorial in the Providence 
Journal, April 11, 1948 



[4] 



SYMPHONY FOR STRING ORCHESTRA 

By Arthur Honegger 

Born at Le Havre, March lo, 1892 



The Symphonie pour Orchestra a Cordes is dated 1941. It was published in 1942 
ivith a dedication to Paul Sacher* and has been performed by him in Basel and 
other Swiss cities. The first American performance was by the Boston Symphony Or- 
chestra, December 27, 1946, Charles Miinch conducting. Dr. Koussevitzky opened 
the 1947 Berkshire Festival with this Symphony on July 24, 1947, and conducted 
it in the Friday and Saturday series, October 31, November 1, 1947 and October 
8, 1948. 

AT the end of the printed score is written, "Paris, October, 1941." 
t\ Willi Reich, writing from Basel for the Christian Science Monitor, 
May 19, 1945, rem